Catalogue


The city of translation : poetry and ideology in nineteenth-century Colombia /
José María Rodríguez García.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xxix, 261 p.
ISBN
0230615333 (alk. paper), 9780230615335 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230615333 (alk. paper)
9780230615335 (alk. paper)
contents note
The Colombian lettered city: philology, ideology, translation -- The regime of translation in Caro's Colombia -- Hugo, Bello, Caro -- Regeneration without revolution: Caro contra Bolivar -- Conclusion: on lettered cities and the writing of lyric.
abstract
A study of the relationship between literary translation, authoritarian politics, linguistic ideologies, juristic philology, religion, and poetry in late nineteenth-century Colombia.
catalogue key
7298869
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Blackmore, J. 2012/09/20.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
PSP Prose Awards, USA, 2010 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-03-01:
This ambitious book integrates diverse academic disciplines to explore the relationship between literary translation, linguistic ideologies, juristic philology, authoritarian politics, religion, and poetry in late-19th-century Colombia. Rodriguez Garcia (Duke Univ.) offers rigorous research focusing on the figure of grammarian, poet, and statesman Miguel Antonio Caro and his influence from 1860 to 1900. The author argues that in direct opposition to a long-standing liberal tradition in governmental policies, Caro led a radical political and intellectual movement based on Catholic ideology looking to establish a centralized theological regime without subverting the democratic political process. According to Rodriguez Garcia, Caro carried out drastic conservative ideological constitutional amendments influencing politics through literature and vice versa. The author now and again resorts to critical narrative intended for scholarly specialists in Colombian intellectual and political history, content that takes attention away from the book's central theme. Although Rodriguez Garcia does not directly acknowledge it, the book deals with nation-state building ideas proposed by Benedict Anderson in the early 1980s. Including vast notes and an up-to-date bibliography, this is a valuable contribution to scholarship on late-19th-century Colombia's politics, ideas, literary culture, and, in particular, author/statesman Caro. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and researchers. J. S. Bottaro Medgar Evers College of The City University of New York
Reviews
Review Quotes
'...a valuable contribution to scholarship on late- 19th-century Colombia's politics, ideas, literary culture, and in particular, author/statesman Caro.' - Choice
"A book on Latin American modernity, nation building, and literary criticism that is theoretically engaged and historically groundeda rare combination. Most importantly, it examines a major Latin American nation, Colombia, whose long and complex lettered history is often bypassed by mainstream Latin Americanist discourse."Roman de la Campa, Edwin and Lenore Williams Professor, University of Pennsylvania " The City of Translation elucidates the complex strategies of the reactionary Colombian political elite to usher in new legislation under the guise of a homogenizing national project. The author's keen insights on the pivotal role of lyrical production, translation (in theory and practice), and the mediating agency of the translator/lyricist in political objectives constitute an outstanding contribution to Latin American intellectual history, one that will compel us to expand our understanding of the term 'foundational fictions.'"Carlos J. Alonso, Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University "Few books deserve to be described as necessary. This one does. RodriguezGarcia brings remarkable rigor and insight to his examination of the nineteenth-century debates that defined the first decades of the Colombian republic. Particularly significant are his penetrating reconstructions of conservative thought, a much neglected area since 'progressive' historians often seem more interested in finding antecedents for their own ideas rather than taking seriously the arguments of Catholic imbued anti-liberalism. He also brings remarkable insight to the ways that notions of proper grammatical usage and belle-lettriste literature were early marshaled to support conservative, hierarchical notions of society and government. In sum, this is an excellent book and a major contribution to nineteenth-century studies."Nicolas Shumway, Dean of Humanities, Rice University
"A book on Latin American modernity, nation building, and literary criticism that is theoretically engaged and historically grounded--a rare combination. Most importantly, it examines a major Latin American nation, Colombia, whose long and complex lettered history is often bypassed by mainstream Latin Americanist discourse."--Roman de la Campa, Edwin and Lenore Williams Professor, University of Pennsylvania "The City of Translationelucidates the complex strategies of the reactionary Colombian political elite to usher in new legislation under the guise of a homogenizing national project. The author's keen insights on the pivotal role of lyrical production, translation (in theory and practice), and the mediating agency of the translator/lyricist in political objectives constitute an outstanding contribution to Latin American intellectual history, one that will compel us to expand our understanding of the term ‘foundational fictions.'"--Carlos J. Alonso, Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University "Few books deserve to be described as necessary. This one does. RodriguezGarcia brings remarkable rigor and insight to his examination of the nineteenth-century debates that defined the first decades of the Colombian republic. Particularly significant are his penetrating reconstructions of conservative thought, a much neglected area since ‘progressive' historians often seem more interested in finding antecedents for their own ideas rather than taking seriously the arguments of Catholic imbued anti-liberalism. He also brings remarkable insight to the ways that notions of proper grammatical usage andbelle-lettristeliterature were early marshaled to support conservative, hierarchical notions of society and government. In sum, this is an excellent book and a major contribution to nineteenth-century studies."--Nicolas Shumway, Dean of Humanities, Rice University
"This ambitious book integrates diverse academic disciplines to explore the relationship between literary translation, linguistic ideologies, juristic philogy, authoritarian politics, religion, and poetry in late-19th-century Colombia."-- Choice "A book on Latin American modernity, nation building, and literary criticism that is theoretically engaged and historically groundeda rare combination. Most importantly, it examines a major Latin American nation, Colombia, whose long and complex lettered history is often bypassed by mainstream Latin Americanist discourse."Roman de la Campa, Edwin and Lenore Williams Professor, University of Pennsylvania " The City of Translation elucidates the complex strategies of the reactionary Colombian political elite to usher in new legislation under the guise of a homogenizing national project. The author's keen insights on the pivotal role of lyrical production, translation (in theory and practice), and the mediating agency of the translator/lyricist in political objectives constitute an outstanding contribution to Latin American intellectual history, one that will compel us to expand our understanding of the term 'foundational fictions.'"Carlos J. Alonso, Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University "Few books deserve to be described as necessary. This one does. Rodriguez Garcia brings remarkable rigor and insight to his examination of the nineteenth-century debates that defined the first decades of the Colombian republic. Particularly significant are his penetrating reconstructions of conservative thought, a much neglected area since 'progressive' historians often seem more interested in finding antecedents for their own ideas rather than taking seriously the arguments of Catholic imbued anti-liberalism. He also brings remarkable insight to the ways that notions of proper grammatical usage and belle-lettriste literature were early marshaled to support conservative, hierarchical notions of society and government. In sum, this is an excellent book and a major contribution to nineteenth-century studies."Nicolas Shumway, Dean of Humanities, Rice University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
WINNER OF THE PROSE AWARD FOR LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND LINGUISTICS! The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation" - a variation on, and a correction to, Angel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of " translatio " the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.
Main Description
WINNER OF THE PROSE AWARD FOR LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND LINGUISTICS! The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation"--a variation on, and acorrection to, Angel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of " translatio " the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.
Description for Bookstore
A study of the relationship between literary translation, authoritarian politics, linguistic ideologies, juristic philology, religion, and poetry in late nineteenth-century Colombia
Description for Bookstore
A study of the relationship between literary translation, authoritarian politics, linguistic ideologies, juristic philology, religion, and poetry in late nineteenth-century Colombia
Library of Congress Summary
A study of the relationship between literary translation, authoritarian politics, linguistic ideologies, juristic philology, religion, and poetry in late nineteenth-century Colombia.
Main Description
WINNER OF THE PROSE AWARD FOR LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND LINGUISTICS! The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation"a variation on, and a correction to, Angel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of " translatio " the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.
Main Description
WINNER OF THE PROSE AWARD FOR LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND LINGUISTICS The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literatis rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation"-a variation on, and a correction to, Angel Ramas understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of "translatio" the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.
Main Description
The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation"a variation on, and a correction to, Angel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of " translatio " the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.
Main Description
The two principal questions thatThe City of Translationsets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation"--a variation on, and a correction to, Angel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project.The City of Translationmakes the tropes of "translatio" the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.
Main Description
The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, José María Rodríguez García investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation"'”a variation on, and a correction to, Ángel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of " translatio " the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.
Table of Contents
The Colombian Lettered City: Philology, Ideology, Translation
The Regime of Translation in Caro's Colombia
Hugo, Bello, Caro
Regeneration without Revolution: Caro contra Bolávar
Conclusion: On Lettered Cities, Political Theologies, and the Writing of Lyric
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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