Catalogue


Antimercantilism in late medieval English literature /
Roger A. Ladd.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
218 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230620434, 9780230620438
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230620434
9780230620438
catalogue key
7297934
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [195]-212) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Roger A. Ladd is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Theatre at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. He has published articles on merchant and guild connections to literature in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Ladd has provided us with a clear and thorough overview of merchant attitudes found in literature in the Late Middle Ages. This is an important foundational reading that now allows us to set off with all sorts of interesting questions."-- The Medieval Review "Ladd's is the first fresh re-thinking of the roles merchants play in late medieval English writing in at least forty yearsif not the first ever to do so systematically and comprehensively. There are many dots to connect in the story he wants to tell, and his scholarly range abets him to link nearly all into a persuasive narrative drawn from the historical record and the literary canon. What he seeks in the authors he scrutinizessome great, like Chaucer, Gower, and Langland, some anonymous or only dimly known, like the writers of the York cycle of mystery playsis the presentation of the true 'mercantile voice,' unfiltered through established (and hence distorting) lenses. Ladd's readings are even-handed, original and, time and again, spot on. Few will pick up this book and put it down uninformed." RF Yeager, University of West Florida
"Ladd's is the first fresh re-thinking of the roles merchants play in late medieval English writing in at least forty yearsif not the first ever to do so systematically and comprehensively. There are many dots to connect in the story he wants to tell, and his scholarly range abets him to link nearly all into a persuasive narrative drawn from the historical record and the literary canon. What he seeks in the authors he scrutinizessome great, like Chaucer, Gower, and Langland, some anonymous or only dimly known, like the writers of the York cycle of mystery playsis the presentation of the true 'mercantile voice,' unfiltered through established (and hence distorting) lenses. Ladd's readings are even-handed, original and, time and again, spot on. Few will pick up this book and put it down uninformed." RF Yeager, University of West Florida
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Antimercantilism in Late Medieval English Literature explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity surrounding a single class/estate group and its characteristic sins in the context of literary texts influenced by estates satire.
Description for Bookstore
This study explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity in late medieval literature
Library of Congress Summary
"Antimercantilism in Late Medieval English Literature explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity surrounding a single class/estate group and its characteristic sins in the context of literary texts influenced by estates satire. This book focuses in depth on both large works by well-known authors and lesser-studied works, including The Canterbury Tales, Piers Plowman, Gower's Mirour de l'Omme, The Book of Margery Kempe, The York Plays, The Libelle of Englyshe Polycye, "The Childe of Bristowe," and the Pseudo-Chaucerian "Tale of Beryn." Its approach documents the trajectory of antimercantile ideology under the pressures of the major developments made in economic theory and practice in the later Middle Ages"--
Main Description
Antimercantilism in Late Medieval English Literature documents the trajectory of antimercantile ideology under the pressures of the major developments made in economic theory and practice in the later Middle Ages. Roger A. Ladd skillfully explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity surrounding a single class/estate group and its characteristic sins in the context of literary texts influenced by estates satire. This book focuses in depth on both large works by well-known authors and lesser-studied works, including The Canterbury Tales , Piers Plowman , Mirour de l'Omme , The Book of Margery Kempe , The York Plays , The Libelle of Englyshe Polycye , "The Childe of Bristowe," and the Pseudo-Chaucerian "Tale of Beryn."
Main Description
Antimercantilism in Late Medieval English Literaturedocuments the trajectory of antimercantile ideology under the pressures of the major developments made in economic theory and practice in the later Middle Ages. Roger A. Ladd skillfully explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity surrounding a single class/estate group and its characteristic sins in the context of literary texts influenced by estates satire. This book focuses in depth on both large works by well-known authors and lesser-studied works, includingThe Canterbury Tales,Piers Plowman,Mirour de l'Omme,The Book of Margery Kempe,The York Plays,The Libelle of Englyshe Polycye, "The Childe of Bristowe," and the Pseudo-Chaucerian "Tale of Beryn."
Main Description
This study explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity in late medieval literature, documenting the trajectory of antimercantile ideology against major developments in economic theory and practice in the later Middle Ages.
Main Description
This study explores the relationship between ideology and subjectivity in late medieval literature, documenting the trajectory of antimercantile ideology alongside major developments in economic theory and practice in the later Middle Ages.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
An Introduction to Late Medieval English Literary Merchantsp. 1
Langland's Merchants and the Material and Spiritual Economies of Piers Plowman Bp. 23
The Mirour de l'Omme and Gower's London Merchantsp. 49
The Deliberate Ambiguity of Chaucer's Anxious Merchantsp. 77
Mercantile Voices of the Early Fifteenth Centuryp. 101
The Mercers, Civic Power, and Charity in the York Cyclep. 133
Conclusion: From Finchale To York: Are Merchants Respectable by 1500?p. 157
Notesp. 161
Bibliographyp. 195
Indexp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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