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Brazil and the United States : convergence and divergence /
Joseph Smith.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2010.
description
243 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0820327700 (pbk.), 9780820327709 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2010.
isbn
0820327700 (pbk.)
9780820327709 (pbk.)
contents note
The South American empire -- From empire to republic -- The new era -- The republic under threat -- The global crisis -- The cold war -- The rise and fall of military government.
catalogue key
7293732
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-09-01:
Brazil is the largest and most important nation in South America. Despite this, few Americans know much about the great colossus, except perhaps that Brazil grows a lot of coffee and is a world soccer power. Many do not understand how vital Brazil is to US foreign relations. This slim volume attempts to rectify that ignorance. Smith (Univ. of Exeter, UK) has written a lucid overview of Brazilian-American relations that will be useful to scholars, policy makers, and casual readers for years to come. The author traces the ebb and flow of relations from their origin in 1822 to the present era, focusing on the 20th century. As trade in coffee and rubber grew toward the end of the 19th century, relations increased and improved. For most of the past century, Brazil supported US aspirations in the hemisphere and globe in return for US support of its goals. This close cooperation lasted for seven decades until the 1970s. Since then, relations have been amicable but also marked by diverging interests. The narrative is well written, and the author has an impressive grasp of the major works in the field. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers to researchers. W. M. Weis Illinois Wesleyan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A balanced, well-paced, lucidly written examination of the core issues at stake in the US–Brazilian relationship."- International Affairs
"A balanced, well-paced, lucidly written examination of the core issues at stake in the USBrazilian relationship."- International Affairs
"Joseph Smith's treatment of Brazil--United States relations is the best synthesis of the subject.t Smith's clear organization and presentation make this volume a required introduction for students and any other interested in the subject."--Sonny B. Davis, Hispanic American Historical Review
"Joseph Smith's treatment of Brazil-United States relations is the best synthesis of the subject.t Smith's clear organization and presentation make this volume a required introduction for students and any other interested in the subject."-Sonny B. Davis, Hispanic American Historical Review
"Smith has written a lucid overview of Brazilian-American relations that will be useful to scholars, policy makers, and casual readers for years to come."- Choice
"Succinctly covering two hundred years of relations between Brazil and the United States, Smith's fine volume is the most comprehensive and balanced survey available in English."-Marshall Eakin, Vanderbilt University
“Succinctly covering two hundred years of relations between Brazil and the United States, Smith’s fine volume is the most comprehensive and balanced survey available in English.”-Marshall Eakin, Vanderbilt University
"This pointed, concise volume, the last in the series, admirably upholds the standard of excellence so consistently maintained by the editor, Lester D. Langley. A job well done!"-Mark T. Gilderhus, Texas Christian University
“This pointed, concise volume, the last in the series, admirably upholds the standard of excellence so consistently maintained by the editor, Lester D. Langley. A job well done!”-Mark T. Gilderhus, Texas Christian University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Although Brazil and the United States have long regarded each other sympathetically, relations between the two countries have been adversely affected by geographical distance, language barriers, and cultural indifference. In this comprehensive overview, Joseph Smith examines the history of Brazil-U.S. relations from the early nineteenth century to the present day. With the exception of commerce, notably the coffee trade, there was relatively little contact between the countries during the nineteenth century. A convergence of national interests took place during the first decade of the twentieth century and was exemplified in Brazil's strategy of "approximating" its foreign policy to that pursued by the United States. In return, Brazil expected economic gains and diplomatic support for its ambition to be the leading power in South America. But U.S. leaders were cautious and self-serving. Brazil was treated as a special ally, according to Smith, but only at times of major crisis such as the two world wars. As the twentieth century progressed, friction developed over programs of U.S. financial assistance and efforts to deal with the threat of communism. Recently there have been disagreements over Brazil's determination to take its rightful place as a global economic player and regional leader. Nonetheless history reveals that these two giant nations of the Western Hemisphere share national interests that they realize are best served by maintaining a friendly, cooperative relationship.
Main Description
Although Brazil and the United States have long regarded each other sympathetically, relations between the two countries have been adversely affected by geographical distance, language barriers, and cultural indifference. In this comprehensive overview, Joseph Smith examines the history of Brazil-U.S. relations from the early nineteenth century to the present day. With the exception of commerce, notably the coffee trade, there was relatively little contact between the countries during the nineteenth century. A convergence of national interests took place during the first decade of the twentieth century and was exemplified in Brazil’s strategy of “approximating” its foreign policy to that pursued by the United States. In return, Brazil expected economic gains and diplomatic support for its ambition to be the leading power in South America. But U.S. leaders were cautious and self-serving. Brazil was treated as a special ally, according to Smith, but only at times of major crisis such as the two world wars. As the twentieth century progressed, friction developed over programs of U.S. financial assistance and efforts to deal with the threat of communism. Recently there have been disagreements over Brazil’s determination to take its rightful place as a global economic player and regional leader. Nonetheless history reveals that these two giant nations of the Western Hemisphere share national interests that they realize are best served by maintaining a friendly, cooperative relationship.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The South American Empire
From Empire to Republic
The New Era
The Republic under Threat
The Global Crisis
The Cold War
The Rise and Fall of Military Government
Epilogue
Notes
Bibliographical Essay
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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