Catalogue


The surprising election and confirmation of King David /
J. Randall Short.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard Divinity School : distributed by Harvard University Press, c2010.
description
xiii, 244 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0674053419 (alk. paper), 9780674053410 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard Divinity School : distributed by Harvard University Press, c2010.
isbn
0674053419 (alk. paper)
9780674053410 (alk. paper)
contents note
1 Samuel 16-2 Samuel 5 as "the history of David's rise"/"the apology of David" in modern scholarship -- The history of David's rise and the apology of Ḫattušili : a reappraisal -- A reconsideration of the history of David's rise as an answer to charges against David -- YHWH's initial and immediate act of finding, choosing, and providing himself a king in the person of David -- The surprising election and confirmation of David as YHWH's beloved son.
abstract
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of David's rise to kingship in First and Second Samuel. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible?. An answer that has become increasingly popular is that this narrative should be interpreted as the "apology of David," that is, the personal justification of King David against charges that he illegitimately usurped Saul's throne. Comparisons between "the History of David's Rise" and the Hittite "Apology of Hattušili," in particular, appear to support this view that the biblical account belongs to the genre of ancient Near Eastern royal apology. Having presented this approach, Randall Short argues that the biblical account has less in common with the Hittite apology than scholars have asserted, and he demonstrates how interpretive assumptions about the historical reality behind the text inform the meaning that these scholars discern in the text. His central contention is that this story should not be interpreted as the personal exoneration of David composed to win over suspicious readers. Rather, composed for faithful readers represented by David, the story depicts the dramatic confirmation of David's surprising election through his gradual emergence as the beloved son of Jesse, Saul, all Israel, and yhwh Himself.--From publisher's description.
catalogue key
7286366
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
J. Randall Short (Th.D., Harvard Divinity School) is Assistant Professor of Old Testament and Director of the Asian Christian Theological Studies program at Tokyo Christian University.
Reviews
Review Quotes
This provocative and well-reasoned interpretation of David's rise to kingship challenges the standard political reading of the narrative and impressively recovers its key theological dimensions. By refusing to assimilate the text to its putative ancient Near Eastern parallels, Randall Short enriches our understanding of an exceedingly subtle and complex narrative in a valuable way. This volume should command the attention of scholars, students, and clergy alike.Jon D. Levenson, Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies, Harvard Divinity School
It not frequent that a book comes along and proposes a bold new approach to a problem that was once thought to be solved. Short's bold and deftly argued thesis about the founding of the Davidic Kingdom is going to mark a new direction for the exegesis of I and II Samuel.Gary A. Anderson, Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame
It is not frequent that a book comes along and proposes a bold new approach to a problem that was once thought to be solved. Short's bold and deftly argued thesis about the founding of the Davidic Kingdom is going to mark a new direction for the exegesis of I and II Samuel.Gary A. Anderson, Department of Theology, University of Notre Dame
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of Davids rise to kingship in First and Second Samuel. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible? An answer that has become increasingly popular is that this narrative should be interpreted as the apology of David, that is, the personal justification of King David against charges that he illegitimately usurped Sauls throne. Comparisons between the History of Davids Rise and the Hittite Apology of Hattuaili, in particular, appear to support this view that the biblical account belongs to the genre of ancient Near Eastern royal apology. Having presented this approach, Randall Short argues that the biblical account has less in common with the Hittite apology than scholars have asserted, and he demonstrates how interpretive assumptions about the historical reality behind the text inform the meaning that these scholars discern in the text. His central contention is that this story should not be interpreted as the personal exoneration of David composed to win over suspicious readers. Rather, composed for faithful readers represented by David, the story depicts the dramatic confirmation of Davids surprising election through his gradual emergence as the beloved son of Jesse, Saul, all Israel, and yhwh Himself.
Main Description
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of David's rise to kingship in First and Second Samuel. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible?An answer that has become increasingly popular is that this narrative should be interpreted as the "apology of David," that is, the personal justification of King David against charges that he illegitimately usurped Saul's throne. Comparisons between "the History of David's Rise" and the Hittite "Apology of HattuÅ ili," in particular, appear to support this view that the biblical account belongs to the genre of ancient Near Eastern royal apology.Having presented this approach, Randall Short argues that the biblical account has less in common with the Hittite apology than scholars have asserted, and he demonstrates how interpretive assumptions about the historical reality behind the text inform the meaning that these scholars discern in the text. His central contention is that this story should not be interpreted as the personal exoneration of David composed to win over suspicious readers. Rather, composed for faithful readers represented by David, the story depicts the dramatic confirmation of David's surprising election through his gradual emergence as the beloved son of Jesse, Saul, all Israel, and yhwh Himself.
Main Description
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of David's rise to kingship in First and Second Samuel. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible? An answer that has become increasingly popular is that this narrative should be interpreted as the "apology of David," that is, the personal justification of King David against charges that he illegitimately usurped Saul's throne. Comparisons between "the History of David's Rise" and the Hittite "Apology of Hattušili," in particular, appear to support this view that the biblical account belongs to the genre of ancient Near Eastern royal apology. Having presented this approach, Randall Short argues that the biblical account has less in common with the Hittite apology than scholars have asserted, and he demonstrates how interpretive assumptions about the historical reality behind the text inform the meaning that these scholars discern in the text. His central contention is that this story should not be interpreted as the personal exoneration of David composed to win over suspicious readers. Rather, composed for faithful readers represented by David, the story depicts the dramatic confirmation of David's surprising election through his gradual emergence as the beloved son of Jesse, Saul, all Israel, and yhwh Himself.
Main Description
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of David's rise to kingship in First and Second Samuel. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible?
Main Description
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of David’s rise to kingship in First and Second Samuel. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible? An answer that has become increasingly popular is that this narrative should be interpreted as the “apology of David,” that is, the personal justification of King David against charges that he illegitimately usurped Saul’s throne. Comparisons between “the History of David’s Rise” and the Hittite “Apology of Hattuaili,” in particular, appear to support this view that the biblical account belongs to the genre of ancient Near Eastern royal apology. Having presented this approach, Randall Short argues that the biblical account has less in common with the Hittite apology than scholars have asserted, and he demonstrates how interpretive assumptions about the historical reality behind the text inform the meaning that these scholars discern in the text. His central contention is that this story should not be interpreted as the personal exoneration of David composed to win over suspicious readers. Rather, composed for faithful readers represented by David, the story depicts the dramatic confirmation of David’s surprising election through his gradual emergence as the beloved son of Jesse, Saul, all Israel, and yhwh Himself.
Library of Congress Summary
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of David's rise to kingship in First and Second Samuel. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible'. An answer that has become increasingly popular is that this narrative should be interpreted as the "apology of David," that is, the personal justification of King David against charges that he illegitimately usurped Saul's throne. Comparisons between "the History of David's Rise" and the Hittite "Apology of Hattusili," in particular, appear to support this view that the biblical account belongs to the genre of ancient Near Eastern royal apology. Having presented this approach, Randall Short argues that the biblical account has less in common with the Hittite apology than scholars have asserted, and he demonstrates how interpretive assumptions about the historical reality behind the text inform the meaning that these scholars discern in the text. His central contention is that this story should not be interpreted as the personal exoneration of David composed to win over suspicious readers. Rather, composed for faithful readers represented by David, the story depicts the dramatic confirmation of David's surprising election through his gradual emergence as the beloved son of Jesse, Saul, all Israel, and yhwh Himself.--From publisher's description.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Some of the best-known biblical episodes are found in the story of David's rise to kingship. Why was this series of stories included in the Bible? An answer that has become popular is that this narrative should be interpreted as the 'apology of David', the personal justification of King David against charges that he wrongly usurped Saul's throne.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
My Approach to the Hebrew Biblical Textp. 6
1 Samuel 16-2 Samuel 5 as "The History of David's Rise"/"The Apology of David" in Modern Scholarshipp. 13
Overview of HDR in Modern Scholarshipp. 13
Approach and Aimsp. 17
Basic Assumptions and Rationale Underlying the Identification of HDRp. 20
Source Analysis and the Identification of 1 Samuel 16-2 Samuel's Earlier Editionsp. 25
Deuteronomistic Edition (Dtr1) of HDRp. 26
Prophetic Edition of HDRp. 31
Other Accretionsp. 34
Summaryp. 37
The History of David's Rise as the Apology of Davidp. 39
Thematic Comparison between HDR and the Hittite Apology of Hattu¿ilip. 39
The Rhetorical Posture of HDRp. 43
Conclusionp. 48
The History of David's Rise and the Apology of Hattu¿ili-A Reappraisalp. 51
Introductionp. 51
Hoffner's Analysis of the Apology of Hattu¿ili III and the Proclamation of Telipinup. 53
A Reappraisal of the Formal and Thematic Similarities and Dissimilarities between HDR and the Apology of Hattu¿ilip. 56
Introductionp. 57
Historical Survey of Noble Antecedentsp. 62
Historical Survey of the Unworthy Predecessorp. 66
The Coup d'étatp. 84
The Merciful Victorp. 88
The Edictp. 91
Independent First-Person Account vs. Embedded Third-Person Accountp. 94
Conclusionp. 96
A Reconsideration of the History of David's Rise as an Answer to Charges Against Davidp. 99
Speech-act Theoryp. 101
McCarter's Identification of Charges Against David-A Reconsideration of the Illocutionary Force of the Biblical Account of David's Rise to the Thronep. 103
David Sought to Advance Himself at Court at Saul's Expensep. 104
David Was a Deserterp. 111
David Was an Outlawp. 115
David Was a Philistine Mercenaryp. 118
David Was Implicated in Saul's, Abner's, and Ishbaal's Deathsp. 119
Conclusionp. 126
Yhwh's Initial and Immediate Act of Finding, Choosing, and Providing Himself a King in the Person of Davidp. 129
Yhwh's Immediate and Mediate Election of Davidp. 132
The Timing of Yhwh's Election of Davidp. 133
"I Have Seen Myself a King"p. 135
"I Have Found Myself a King"p. 136
"I Have Chosen Myself a King"p. 139
"I Have Provided Myself a King"p. 140
Conclusionp. 144
The Surprising Election and Confirmation of David as Yhwh's Beloved Sonp. 145
Yhwh's Confirmation of David as His Beloved Sonp. 145
David, Beloved Son of Jessep. 146
The Seer Looks for the Son of Jesse whom Yhwh has Seenp. 146
Yhwh's Surprising Choice of "the Least" of Jesse's Sonsp. 148
From "One Among Jesse's Sons" to "the Son of Jesse"p. 154
The Insignificance of David and His Father's Housep. 157
The Responses of Samuel and the Bethlehemite Eldersp. 158
David, Son of a Nobodyp. 163
Other Effacements of David and His Housep. 166
David, Beloved Son of Saulp. 169
Jonathan's Preference for David over Himselfp. 170
David, "Son of Saul"p. 173
David, Beloved Son of Yhwh and His People Israelp. 179
The Public Confirmation of David through His Anointingp. 180
David's Elevation over Saul in the Eyes of His Family and "All Israel"p. 186
David's Elevation over Saul in Saul's Own Eyesp. 191
Conclusionp. 191
Conclusionp. 193
Bibliographyp. 201
Index of Primary Sourcesp. 225
Index of Subjectsp. 235
Index of Modern Authorsp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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