Catalogue

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Women's bodies and medical science : an inquiry into cervical cancer /
Linda Bryder.
imprint
Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
vi, 250 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0230236030 (hbk.), 9780230236035 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230236030 (hbk.)
9780230236035 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7284371
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Linda Bryder is Professor in History at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, with a special research interest in the history of health and medicine.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This is an impressive book, tackling a grave and sensitive episode in the history of medicine, women and feminism. . . . Bryder reveals much about the public understanding (and misunderstanding) of science, the role of the media, and democratic practice in a world increasingly understood, managed and explained by cultures of expertise.'- Janet McCalman, Centre for Health & Society, University of Melbourne 'Professor Bryder has addressed a question that has remained inadequately investigated for over a quarter of a century. What was the 'generally accepted', 'conventional' treatment for abnormal cervical cytology which women in Auckland were allegedly denied in the late 1960s and 1970s? Her thorough review of international practice at that time makes clear that there was no generally accepted treatment, a fact that reflected the haphazard way in which screening for cancer of the cervix had been introduced and evaluated.'- Iain Chalmers, James Lind Library, Oxford
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is an analysis of a scandal involving a doctor accused of allowing a number of women to develop cervical cancer from carcinoma in situ as part of an experiment he had been conducting into conservative treatment of the disease, to explore dramatic changes in medical history in the second half of the 20th century.
Description for Bookstore
An exploration of relationships between women and gynaecologists in late twentieth century New Zealand
Long Description
In 1987 a scandal erupted in New Zealand, following allegations that a doctor at National Women's Hospital had allowed some women to develop cervical cancer while conducting research into the disease. An official inquiry concluded that doctors had failed their patients. This book revisits that important episode in New Zealand's social and medical history, examining the factors which led to the Inquiry and whether it was correct in its assessment that patient welfare had been compromised in the interest of science. In addressing that question crucial aspects within the history of medicine and public health are explored - the use and interpretation of medical technology, randomized controlled trials, population screening, public understandings of science, the status of doctors in the late twentieth century, and doctor-patient relationships. This history of the interface of medicine with society in the second half of the twentieth century has relevance well beyond New Zealand.
Main Description
An analysis of a scandal involving a doctor accused of allowing a number of women to develop cervical cancer from carcinoma in situ as part of an experiment he had been conducting since the 1960s into conservative treatment of the disease, to more broadly explore dramatic changes in medical history in the second half of the twentieth century.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Introduction: An Inquiry into Cervical Cancerp. 1
Carcinoma in Situ: Meanings and Medical Significancep. 7
Management of Patients with Carcinoma in Situp. 32
The Therapeutic Relationship and Patient Consentp. 57
A Profession Dividedp. 74
Popuplation-based Cervical Screeningp. 89
Four Women Take on the Might of the Medical Professionp. 108
The Cervical Cancer Inquiry and the 'full story'p. 125
Media Wars: The Report's Receptionp. 152
New World, Better World? Implementing Cartwrightp. 174
The Aftermath: Public Perceptions of Unethical Practicep. 191
Conclusion: An 'Unfortunate Experiment'?p. 197
Notesp. 202
Bibliographyp. 233
Indexp. 246
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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