Catalogue

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Dead woman pickney : a memoir of childhood in Jamaica /
Yvonne Shorter Brown.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2010.
description
viii, 198 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1554581893, 9781554581894
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2010.
isbn
1554581893
9781554581894
catalogue key
7284306
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-198).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Yvonne Shorter Brown is a retired public school teacher, university lecturer, researcher, writer, and social justice advocate.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text chronicles the life stories of the difficulties of growing up in Jamaica without a mother, containing both personal experience and history, told with stridency and humour.
Long Description
This book chronicles life stories of growing up in Jamaica from 1943 to 1965 and contains both personal experience and history, told with stridency and humour. The author's coming of age parallels the political stages of Jamaica's moving from the richest Crown colony of Great Britain to an independent nation within the British Commonwealth of Nations. Taking up the haunting memories of childhood, along with her astonishment at persistent racial marginalisation, both locally and globally, the author sets out to construct a narrative that at once explains her own origins in the former slave society of Jamaica and traces the outsider status of Africa and its people. The author's quest to understand the absence of her mother and her mother's people from her life is at the heart of this narrative. The title, "Dead Woman Pickney", is in Jamaican patois, and its meaning unfolds throughout the narrative. It begins with the author's childhood question of what a mother is, followed by the realisation of the vulnerability of a child without its mother's protection. The term 'pickney' was the name for slave children on sugar plantations, and post-emancipation the term was retained for the descendants of enslaved Africans and the children of black women fathered by slavers. The author struggles through her life to discover the identity of her mother in the face of silence from her father's brutal family. A wonderful resource for teachers of history, social studies, cultural studies, and literature, this work could be used as a starting point to discuss issues of diasporic identities, colonialism, racism, impact of slavery, and Western imperialism around the world. It is also an engaging read for those interested in memoir and life writing.
Main Description
Chronicles the life stories of the difficulties of growing up in Jamaica without a mother, containing both personal experience and history, told with stridency and humour.
Main Description
Dead Woman Pickneychronicles life stories of growing up in Jamaica from 1943 to 1965 and contains both personal experience and history, told with stridency and humour. The author's coming of age parallels the political stages of Jamaica's moving from the richest Crown colony of Great Britain to an independent nation within the British Commonwealth of Nations. Taking up the haunting memories of childhood, along with her astonishment at persistent racial marginalization, both locally and globally, the author sets out to construct a narrative that at once explains her own origins in the former slave society of Jamaica and traces the outsider status of Africa and its peoples. The author's quest to understand the absence of her mother and her mother's people from her life is at the heart of this narrative. The title, Dead Woman Pickney, is in Jamaican patois, and its meaning unfolds throughout the narrative. It begins with the author's childhood question of what a mother is, followed by the realization of the vulnerability of a child without its mother's protection. The term "pickney" was the name for slave children on sugar plantations, and post-emancipation the term was retained for the descendants of enslaved Africans and the children of black women fathered by slavers. The author struggles through her life to discover the identity of her mother in the face of silence from her father's brutal family. A wonderful resource for teachers of history, social studies, cultural studies, and literature, this work could be used as a starting point to discuss issues of diasporic identities, colonialism, racism, impact of slavery, and Western imperialism around the world. It is also an engaging read for those interested in memoir and life writing.
Main Description
Dead Woman Pickneychronicles life stories of growing up in Jamaica from 1943 to 1965 and contains both personal experience and history, told with stridency and humour. The authors coming of age parallels the political stages of Jamaicas moving from the richest Crown colony of Great Britain to an independent nation within the British Commonwealth of Nations.Taking up the haunting memories of childhood, along with her astonishment at persistent racial marginalization, both locally and globally, the author sets out to construct a narrative that at once explains her own origins in the former slave society of Jamaica and traces the outsider status of Africa and its peoples. The authors quest to understand the absence of her mother and her mothers people from her life is at the heart of this narrative. The title, Dead Woman Pickney, is in Jamaican patois, and its meaning unfolds throughout the narrative. It begins with the authors childhood question of what a mother is, followed by the realization of the vulnerability of a child without its mothers protection. The term pickney was the name for slave children on sugar plantations, and post-emancipation the term was retained for the descendants of enslaved Africans and the children of black women fathered by slavers. The author struggles through her life to discover the identity of her mother in the face of silence from her fathers brutal family.A wonderful resource for teachers of history, social studies, cultural studies, and literature, this work could be used as a starting point to discuss issues of diasporic identities, colonialism, racism, impact of slavery, and Western imperialism around the world. It is also an engaging read for those interested in memoir and life writing.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Prologuep. 1
Early Childhood Memories, 1947-50p. 6
Louisiana Blues, circa 1950-54p. 34
Life and Schooling in May Pen, circa 1955-62p. 74
Clarendon College, Chapelton, January 1960-July 1961p. 109
Becoming a Teacher: Mico College, 1962-65p. 150
Epiloguep. 193
Notesp. 196
Bibliographyp. 197
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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