Catalogue


The capital and the colonies : London and the Atlantic economy, 1660-1700 /
Nuala Zahedieh.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
xvii, 329 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521514231 (Cloth), 9780521514231 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
0521514231 (Cloth)
9780521514231 (Cloth)
abstract
"Between 1660 and 1700, London established itself as the capital and commercial hub of a thriving Atlantic empire, accounting for three quarters of the nation's colonial trade, and playing a vital coordinating role in an increasingly coherent Atlantic system. Nuala Zahedieh's unique study provides the first detailed picture of how that mercantile system was made to work. By identifying the leading colonial merchants, she shows through their collective experiences how London developed the capabilities to compete with its continental rivals and ensure compliance with the Navigation Acts. Zahedieh shows that in making mercantilism work, Londoners helped to create the conditions which underpinned the long period of structural change and economic growth which culminated in the Industrial Revolution"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7268928
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 293-321) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An economic and social historian, Zahedieh attacks her subject with empirical rigor. The results are detailed and meticulous, if generally longer on data than interpretation." -William and Mary Quarterly
"Nuala Zahedieh's monograph draws on articles she has published over the past quarter century and adds additional material from her continuing research on London's commercial community and its fortunes in the late seventeenth century." -Kenneth Morgan, Journal of British Studies
"This beautifully produced volume, with footnotes at the bottom of pages, clear maps, many unusual illustrations, and a valuable bibliography, will be of special and enduring interest to maritime historians of the Atlantic, the English empire, and London." -Ian K. Steele, International Journal of Maritime History
"...this volume fills a scholarly gap through years of laborious archival research. Anyone interested in the colonial trade of the later seventeenth century owes thanks to the author." -Koji Yamamoto, The Journal of Modern History
"...Zahedieh's book points to the urgent need for further comparative studies on the Atlantic world from other vantage points than the port of London. For such studies, The Capital and the Colonies offers and excellent model." -Karel Davids, Canadian Journal of History
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Between 1660 and 1700, London established itself as the capital and commercial hub of a thriving Atlantic empire, accounting for three quarters of the nation's colonial trade. Nuala Zahedieh's unique 2010 study provides the first detailed picture of how that mercantile system was made to work.
Description for Bookstore
Between 1660 and 1700, London established itself as the capital and commercial hub of a thriving Atlantic empire, accounting for three quarters of the nation's colonial trade. Nuala Zahedieh's unique study provides the first detailed picture of how that mercantile system was made to work.
Main Description
Between 1660 and 1700, London established itself as the capital and commercial hub of a thriving Atlantic empire, accounting for three quarters of the nation's colonial trade, and playing a vital coordinating role in an increasingly coherent Atlantic system. Nuala Zahedieh's unique 2010 study provides the first detailed picture of how that mercantile system was made to work. By identifying the leading colonial merchants, she shows through their collective experiences how London developed the capabilities to compete with its continental rivals and ensure compliance with the Navigation Acts. Zahedieh shows that in making mercantilism work, Londoners helped to create the conditions which underpinned the long period of structural change and economic growth which culminated in the Industrial Revolution.
Main Description
Between 1660 and 1700, London established itself as the capital and commercial hub of a thriving Atlantic empire, accounting for three quarters of the nation's colonial trade, and playing a vital coordinating role in an increasingly coherent Atlantic system. Nuala Zahedieh's unique study provides the first detailed picture of how that mercantile system was made to work. By identifying the leading colonial merchants, she shows through their collective experiences how London developed the capabilities to compete with its continental rivals and ensure compliance with the Navigation Acts. Zahedieh shows that in making mercantilism work, Londoners helped to create the conditions which underpinned the long period of structural change and economic growth which culminated in the Industrial Revolution.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. ix
List of tablesp. xi
List of figures and mapsp. xiii
Acknowledgementsp. xiv
List of abbreviationsp. xvi
Introductionp. 1
London and the Atlantic economyp. 17
London in the late seventeenth centuryp. 20
The extension and consolidation of England's New World coloniesp. 27
The institutional framework of England's Atlantic systemp. 35
Merchantsp. 55
The structure of London's colonial commodity trade and merchant careersp. 57
The day-to-day workings of London's colonial tradep. 65
Commercial innovationp. 80
The merchants' trainingp. 86
Capital, credit, and reputationp. 90
Merchant associationsp. 103
Trust networksp. 106
Political networks and rent-seeking activitiesp. 113
Wealth accumulationp. 127
Shippingp. 137
Growth of London's Atlantic freight capacityp. 137
Ship-ownersp. 144
Ship-buildingp. 150
Manpowerp. 159
Port of Londonp. 166
Freight ratesp. 173
Importsp. 184
Early expectations and experiments in the New Worldp. 185
Natural bountyp. 190
Tobaccop. 197
Sugarp. 210
Minor staplesp. 226
Bullionp. 230
The impact of the colonial import tradep. 233
Exportsp. 238
White servantsp. 240
Slave labourp. 245
Food and beveragesp. 252
Manufacturesp. 257
Conclusionp. 280
Bibliographyp. 293
Indexp. 322
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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