Catalogue


Screening war : perspectives on German suffering /
edited by Paul Cooke and Marc Silberman.
imprint
Rochester, N.Y. : Camden House, 2010.
description
vi, 304 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1571134379 (hardback : alk. paper), 9781571134370 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Rochester, N.Y. : Camden House, 2010.
isbn
1571134379 (hardback : alk. paper)
9781571134370 (hardback : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: German suffering? / Paul Cooke and Marc Silberman -- Hidden screens: soldiers, martyrs, innocent German victims. Armchair warriors: heroic postures in the West German war film / Jennifer M. Kapczynski -- German martyrs: images of Christianity and resistance to national socialism in German cinema / David Clarke -- The rhetoric of victim narratives in West German films of the 1950s / Manuel Köppen -- Projection screens: disavowing loss, transforming antifascism, contesting memories. Sissi the terrible: melodrama, victimhood, and imperial nostalgia in the Sissi trilogy / Erica Carter -- Political affects: antifascism and the Second World War in Frank Beyer and Konrad Wolf / Sabine Hake -- Shadowlands: the memory of the Ostgebiete in contemporary German film and television / Tim Bergfelder -- Display screens: generational traumas, untimely passions, open wounds. Links and chains: trauma between the generations in the Heimat mode / Rachel Palfreyman -- Resistance of the heart: female suffering and victimhood in DEFA's antifascist films / Daniela Berghahn -- Suffering and sympathy in Volker Schlöndorff's Der neunte Tag and Dennis Gansel's NaPolA / Brad Prager -- Split screens: ambiguous authorities, decentered emotions, performed identities. Eberhard Fechner's history of suffering: TV talk, temporal distance, spatial displacement / John E. Davidson -- The politics of feeling: Alexander Kluge on war, film, and emotion / Johannes von Moltke -- Post-unification German-Jewish relations and the discourse of victimhood in Dani Levy's films / Seán Allan.
catalogue key
7268421
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [267]-285) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Paul Cooke is Professor of German Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds and Marc Silberman is Professor of German at the University of Wisconsin.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Re-examines German cinema's representation of the Germans as victims during the Second World War and its aftermath.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Screening War' offers a re-examination of how German cinema has represented the Germans as victims during the Second World War & its aftermath.
Main Description
The recent "discovery" of German wartime suffering has had a particularly profound impact in German visual culture. Films from Margarethe von Trotta's Rosenstrasse (2003) to Oliver Hirschbiegel's Oscar-nominated Downfall (2004) and the two-part television mini-series Dresden (2006) have explored how ordinary Germans suffered during and after the war. Such films have been presented by critics as treating a topic that had been taboo for German filmmakers. However, the representation of wartime suffering has a long tradition on the German screen. For decades, filmmakers have recontextualized images of Germans as victims to engage shifting social and ideological discourses. By focusing on this process, the present volume explores how the changing representation of Germans as victims has shaped the ways in which both of the postwar German states and the now-unified nation have attempted to face the trauma of the past and to construct a contemporary place for themselves in the world. Contributors: Seán Allan, Tim Bergfelder, Daniela Berghahn, Erica Carter, David Clarke, John E. Davidson, Sabine Hake, Jennifer Kapczynski, Manuel Köppen, Rachel Palfreyman, Brad Prager, Johannes von Moltke. Paul Cooke is Professor of German Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds and Marc Silberman is Professor of German at the University of Wisconsin.
Main Description
The recent "discovery" of German wartime suffering has had a particularly profound impact in German visual culture. Films from Margarethe von Trotta's Rosenstrasse (2003) to Oliver Hirschbiegel's Oscar-nominated Downfall (2004) and the two-part television mini-series Dresden (2006) have shown how ordinary Germans suffered during and after the war. Such films have been presented by critics as treating a topic that had been taboo for German filmmakers. However, the representation of wartime suffering has a long tradition on the German screen. For decades, filmmakers have recontextualized images of Germans as victims to engage shifting social and ideological discourses. By focusing on this process, the present volume explores how the changing representation of Germans as victims has shaped the ways in which both of the postwar German states and the now-unified nation have attempted to face the trauma of the past and to construct a contemporary place for themselves in the world. Contributors: Sefn Allan, Tim Bergfelder, Daniela Berghahn, Erica Carter, David Clarke, John E. Davidson, Sabine Hake, Jennifer Kapczynski, Manuel K_ppen, Rachel Palfreyman, Brad Prager, Johannes von Moltke. Paul Cooke is Professor of German Cultural Studies at the University of Leeds and Marc Silberman is Professor of German at the University of Wisconsin.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: German Suffering?p. 1
Hidden Screens: Soldiers, Martyrs, Innocent German Victims
Armchair Warriors: Heroic Postures in the West German War Filmp. 17
German Martyrs: Images of Christianity and Resistance to National Socialism in German Cinemap. 36
The Rhetoric of Victim Narratives in West German Films of the 1950sp. 56
Projection Screens: Disavowing Loss, Transforming Antifascism, Contesting Memories
Sissi the Terrible: Melodrama, Victimhood, and Imperial Nostalgia in the Sissi Trilogyp. 81
Political Affects: Antifascism and the Second World War in Frank Beyer and Konrad Wolfp. 102
Shadowlands: The Memory of the Ostgebiete in Contemporary German Film and Televisionp. 123
Display Screens: Generational Traumas, Untimely Passions, Open Wounds
Links and Chains: Trauma between the Generations in the Heimat Modep. 145
Resistance of the Heart: Female Suffering and Victimhood in DEFA's Antifascist Filmsp. 165
Suffering and Sympathy in Volker Schlondorff'sp. 187
Split Screens: Ambiguous Authorities, Decentered Emotions, Performed Identities
Eberhard Fechner's History of Suffering: TV Talk, Temporal Distance, Spatial Displacementp. 209
The Politics of Feeling: Alexander Kluge on War, Film, and Emotionp. 230
Post-unification German-Jewish Relations and the Discourse of Victimhood in Dani Levy's Filmsp. 251
Works Citedp. 267
Notes on the Contributorsp. 287
Index of Film Tidesp. 293
Index of Names and Subjectsp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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