Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

UofT Libraries is getting a new library services platform in January 2021.
Learn more about the change.

Trickster : Native American tales : a graphic collection /
edited by Matt Dembicki.
imprint
Golden, CO : Fulcrum Pub., c2010.
description
231 p. : chiefly col. ill. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
9781555917241 (pbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Golden, CO : Fulcrum Pub., c2010.
isbn
9781555917241 (pbk.) :
contents note
Coyote and the pebbles / Dayton Edmonds and Micah Farritor -- Raven the trickster / John Active and Jason Copland -- Azban and the crayfish / James Bruchac, Joseph Bruchac, and Matt Dembicki -- Trickster and the Great Chief / David Smith and Jerry Carr -- Horned Toad Lady and Coyote / Eldrena Douma and Roy Boney, Jr. -- Rabbit and the tug-of-war / Michael Thompson and Jacob Warrenfeltz -- Moshup's bridge / Jonathan Perry, Chris Piers, and Scott White -- Rabbit's Choctaw tail tale / Tim Tingle and Pat Lewis -- The wolf and the mink / Elaine Grinnell and Michelle Silva -- The dangerous beaver / Mary Eyley and Jim Coon -- Giddy up, Wolfie / Greg Rodgers and Mike Short -- How the alligator Got his brown, scaly skin / Joyce Bear and Megan Baehr -- The Yehasuri : the little wild Indians / Beckee Garris and Andrew Cohen -- Waynaboozhoo and the geese / Dan Jones and Michael Auger -- When Coyote decided to get married / Eirik Thorsgard and Rand Arrington -- Puapualenalena, wizard-dog of the Waipi'o Valley / Thomas Cummings, Jr. and Paul Zdepski -- Ishjinki and Buzzard / Jimm GoodTracks and Dimi Macheras -- The bear who stole the Chinook / Jack Gladstone and Evan Keeling -- How Wildcat caught a turkey / Joseph Stands With Many and Jon Sperry -- Espun and Grandfather / John Bear Mitchell and Andy Bennett -- Mai and the cliff-dwelling birds / Sunny Dooley and J. Chris Campbell.
catalogue key
7267364
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2010-04-26:
These 21 folktales, created by pairing Native storytellers with a variety of artists, feature creatures explaining how things came to be, like islands or stars, or animals playing tricks on one another. Often, the trickster, while trying to take the lazy way, outwits himself, especially when it involves Coyote. In other tales, Raven does whatever people tell him not to do, but ends up with a free meal anyway, and Rabbit tricks some buffalo and wolves and is tricked by Fox into losing his tail. Many of the stories, some of which involve tribespeople as well as animals, are told through captions, as though listening to an elder and envisioning the images he describes. Micah Farritor's art in "Coyote and the Pebbles" and Dembicki's in "Azban (Raccoon) and the Crayfish" are standouts in their animal images. The diverse styles are presented in lavish color in this thick, handsome volume. The short collection of contributor bios at the end is a helpful resource for finding more about the artist's credits or the writer's heritage. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-11-05:
Trickster is an anthology that animates, literally, Native American tales revolving around a recurring character of mischief. The Trickster can be either hero or villain but is typically embodied by a clever animal. Thus, it's no surprise that most of the stories here involve coyotes and rabbits (the latter being less clever in nature but far more so when anthropomorphized). "Coyote and the Pebbles" by Dayton Edmonds of the Caddo Nation tells how nocturnal forest creatures conspired to create stars in the sky; it is beautifully illustrated by Micah Farritor. John Active, a Yu'pik Eskimo, writes the tale of "Raven the Trickster," which takes a Jonah and the Whale twist and is lovingly illustrated in pen and ink by Jason Copland. Michael Thompson of the Mvskoke Creek details the story "Rabbit and the Tug-of-War," in which a shifty hare delights in tricking a pair of bison exquisitely rendered by Jacob Warrenfeltz. Verdict As with any anthology, Trickster has some weak spots, particularly when it comes to the computer coloring and illustration style of stories such as "Puapualenalena." Overall, however, it's a solid collection with a unique premise supported by a vast array of artistic approaches.-Robert Young, The Comics Interpreter, Charleston, SC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Vigorously rendered in striking graphic format, this robust anthology of 21 Native American folktales features a bevy of wily rascals in a veritable smorgasbord of trickster tales... this unique collection of Native American folklore invites readers to sample and savor each colorful, wily tale. --Kirkus (starred review) More than 40 storytellers and cartoonists have contributed to this original and provocative compendium of traditional folklore presented in authentic, colorful, and engaging sequential art... The total package is accessible, entertaining, educational, inspiring, and a must-have for all collections. --School Library Journal (starred review) With stories that vary in emotional tone, matching the ever-shifting appearance and character of the trickster himself and the lessons he teaches and learns, this collection is an ideal choice for dipping into over and over. A dandy read for those interested in history, folklore, adventure, humor, or the arts, and a unique contribution to the form. --Booklist (starred review)
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, April 2010
Booklist, May 2010
School Library Journal, May 2010
Library Journal, November 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Over 20 stories, each written by a Native American storyteller, ranging from the serious & dramatic to the funny & fiendish, bring the traditional character of the 'trickster' back into popular culture.
Main Description
All cultures have tales of the trickster-a crafty creature or being who uses cunning to get food, steal precious possessions, or simply cause mischief. He disrupts the order of things, often humiliating others and sometimes himself. In Native American traditions, the trickster takes many forms, from coyote or rabbit to raccoon or raven. The first graphic anthology of Native American trickster tales, Trickster brings together Native American folklore and the world of comics. In Trickster more than twenty Native American tales are cleverly adapted into comic form. Each story is written by a different Native American storyteller who worked closely with a selected illustrator, a combination that gives each tale a unique and powerful voice and look. Ranging from serious and dramatic to funny and sometimes downright fiendish, these tales bring tricksters back into popular culture in a very vivid form. From an ego-driven social misstep in “Coyote and the Pebbles" to the hijinks of “How Wildcat Caught a Turkey" and the hilarity of “Rabbit's Choctaw Tail Tale," Trickster provides entertainment for readers of all ages and backgrounds. Along with compiling and editing the book, artist Matt Dembicki illustrated one of the featured trickster tales. Dembicki is the founder of D.C. Conspiracy, a comic creators' collaborative in Washington, DC, and has won acclaim for his nature graphic novel, Mr. Big . He currently works as an editor for a higher-education association.
Main Description
All cultures have tales of the trickster-a crafty creature or being who uses cunning to get food, steal precious possessions, or simply cause mischief. He disrupts the order of things, often humiliating others and sometimes himself. In Native American traditions, the trickster takes many forms, from coyote or rabbit to raccoon or raven. The first graphic anthology of Native American trickster tales, Trickster brings together Native American folklore and the world of comics.In Trickster more than twenty Native American tales are cleverly adapted into comic form. Each story is written by a different Native American storyteller who worked closely with a selected illustrator, a combination that gives each tale a unique and powerful voice and look. Ranging from serious and dramatic to funny and sometimes downright fiendish, these tales bring tricksters back into popular culture in a very vivid form. From an ego-driven social misstep in "Coyote and the Pebbles" to the hijinks of "How Wildcat Caught a Turkey" and the hilarity of "Rabbit's Choctaw Tail Tale," Trickster provides entertainment for readers of all ages and backgrounds.Along with compiling and editing the book, artist Matt Dembicki illustrated one of the featured trickster tales. Dembicki is the founder of D.C. Conspiracy, a comic creators' collaborative in Washington, DC, and has won acclaim for his nature graphic novel, Mr. Big . He currently works as an editor for a higher-education association.
Main Description
This extraordinary graphic novel depicts traditional Native American trickster tales with inspired artists and native writers.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem