Catalogue


The letters of Heloise and Abelard : a translation of their collected correspondence and related writings /
translated and edited by Mary Martin McLaughlin with Bonnie Wheeler.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
xiv, 366 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0312229356 (alk. paper), 9780312229351 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
uniform title
series title
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0312229356 (alk. paper)
9780312229351 (alk. paper)
contents note
The correspondence of Heloise and Abelard -- Heloise's questions (problemata Heloissae): forty-two questions posed by Heloise and answered by Abelard, with an introductory letter by Heloise -- Related letters and other writings -- Appendices.
catalogue key
7265410
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mary Martin McLaughlin was one of the pre-eminent medieval historians of the twentieth century. Her scholarship concentrated on the religious lives of medieval women and children and families in the Middle Ages. She was the editor of The Portable Medieval Reader and The Portable Renaissance Reader, with James Bruce Ross. She taught at the University of Nebraska, Wellesley College, and Vassar College. Bonnie Wheeler teaches at Southern Methodist University where she directs the Medieval Studies program. She specializes in medieval literature and history with a focus on gender issues and has edited and co-edited fourteen books. She is the executive editor of Arthuriana and President of the council of Editors of Learned Journals.
First Chapter
EXCERPT TESTING THIS IS ONLY A TEST


Excerpted from The Letters of Heloise and Abelard: A Translation of Their Complete Correspondence by Mary Martin McLaughlin
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-09-01:
This new translation of the letters of Abelard and Heloise is the fullest to date. It includes not only the passionate personal letters the two exchanged but also letters to other acquaintances and a series of theological questions posed by Heloise and answered by Abelard. The intense personal quality of these 12th-century letters has kept the lovers' names alive through the ages. Most scholars now accept the authenticity of the letters, although some have speculated that Jean de Meung, who translated them into French in the 13th century, was in fact the author. The passionate eloquence of the letters is captivating, recounting their physical love affair but also portraying their intense intellectual union. Abelard's first letter is autobiographical, telling of his castration in punishment for seducing Heloise and of constant attacks by other envious theologians. Heloise's letters express her pain at their separation and engage Abelard in plans for the convent, even requesting a new rule for nuns, which he provides. This collection allows the reader to relive the tragic love affair between these two legendary figures and to better understand the theological questions that dominated the 12th century. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, faculty. L. W. Yoder emeritus, Davidson College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Heloise and Abelard have been extraordinarily well served by this latest translation of their celebrated correspondence. Every aspect of the book is exemplary, from its comprehensive and unobtrusive annotations, to its enthralling introduction. But the greatest strength of the book is perhaps to undo a lot of the posthumous myth-making surrounding the couple, as its brisk and supple translation allows them to speak openly in their own terms. Thus Heloise clearly emerges with all her fierce passion and fiercer intelligence, while Abelard presents a personality as contradictory as his philosophy, being by turns nostalgic and repentant, combative and humble, caustic and self-pitying. Nonetheless the edition does not restrict itself to these voices alone, but expands their dialogue into a full-blown symposium, including a generous selection of related letters by both hostile and sympathetic parties, such as Peter the Venerable and Bernard of Clairvaux. In sum, this edition is an astonishing scholarly achievement, and will no doubt stand as the authoritative edition for some decades to come."Ben Parsons, Teaching Fellow in English, University of Leicester
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
She began their passionate and complex correspondence by calling him "...her heart's love..". while he referred to her as "...the singular joy and only solace of a weary mind". The letters of Heloise and Abelard will remain one of the great, romantic and intellectual documents of human civilization while the writers themselves are probably second only to Romeo and Juliet in the fame accrued by tragic lovers. Living in the abbey of the Paraclete in the twelfth century, the two poured their hearts and minds out to each other in a series of letters. Here for the first time is the complete correspondence, with commentary by Mary Martin McLaughlin. This book will be a necessity for anyone interested in the medieval period and for those interested in these two unforgettable figures from the distant past. This book is a companion volume to McLaughlin's study of Heloise, Heloise and the Paraclete. Anyone interested in the Middle Ages or the intricacies of letter collections will be thrilled by this historic publication.
Main Description
She began their passionate and complex correspondence by calling him "...her heart's love..." while he referred to her as "...the singular joy and only solace of a weary mind." The letters of Heloise and Abelard will remain one of the great, romantic and intellectual documents of human civilization while they, themselves, are probably second only to Romeo and Juliet in the fame accrued by tragic lovers. Living in the abbey of the Paraclete in the12th century, the two poured each others hearts and minds out to each other in a series of letters. Here for the first time in McLaughlin's edition is the complete correspondence with commentary. This book will be a necessity for anyone interested in the medieval period and for those interested in these two touchingly unforgettable figures from the distant past. This book is a companion volume to McLaughlin's study of Heloise, Heloise and the Paraclete .
Main Description
The letters of Heloise and Abelard remain some of the great romantic and intellectual documents of human civilization while the writers themselves are probably second only to Romeo and Juliet in the fame accrued by tragic lovers. Living in the abbey of the Paraclete in twelfth-century France, the two poured their hearts and minds out to each other in a series of letters. The letters are notable for their intelligence, insight, and philosophy and make clear the reason Heloise and Abelard's story has resounded for centuries. Here, for the first time, is the collected correspondence with accessible commentary from two of our foremost medieval scholars. This book will be a necessity for anyone interested in the medieval period or in these two touchingly unforgettable figures from the distant past.
Main Description
The letters of Heloise and Abelard remain some of the great romantic and intellectual documents of human civilization while the writers themselves are probably second only to Romeo and Juliet in the fame accrued by tragic lovers. Living in the abbey of the Paraclete in twelfth-century France, the two poured their hearts and minds out to each other in a series of letters. The letters are notable for their intelligence, insight, and philosophy and make clear the reason Heloise and Abelard's story has resounded for centuries. Here, for the first time, is the collected& correspondence with accessible commentary from two of our foremost medieval scholars. This book will be a necessity for anyone interested in the medieval period or in these two touchingly unforgettable figures from the distant past.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Chronologyp. xi
Mapsp. xv
Abbreviationsp. xix
Introductionp. 1
The Correspondence of Heloise and Abelard
Abelard's Letter of Consolation to a Friend: A Story of Calamitiesp. 17
Heloise to Abelardp. 51
Abelard to Heloisep. 57
Heloise to Abelardp. 63
Abelard to Heloisep. 71
Heloise to Abelardp. 85
Abelard to Heloise: The Origin of the Religious Life of Nuns (Concerning the Authority and Dignity of the Order of Nuns)p. 99
Abelard to Heloise: A Rule for Nunsp. 133
Peter Abelard: To the Nuns of the Paraclete On Studiesp. 195
Abelard to Heloise: A Profession of Faithp. 209
Heloise's Questions (Problemata Heloissae): Forty-Two Questions Posed by Heloise and Answered by Abelard, with an Introductory Letter by Heloise
Heloise to Abelardp. 213
Related Letters and Other Writings
Abelard to Abbot Bernard of Clairvauxp. 271
Abelard to His "Comrades"p. 279
Abbot Bernard of Clairvaux to Cardinal Ivop. 281
Abbot Bernard of Clairvaux to Pope Innocent IIp. 285
Peter the Venerable: Letter to Pope Innocent IIp. 289
Peter the Venerable: A Letter to Heloisep. 293
Heloise to Peter the Venerablep. 299
Peter the Venerable to Heloisep. 301
Peter the Venerable: A Letter of Absolution for Abelardp. 303
Peter the Venerable: An Epitaph for Abelardp. 305
The Nuns of the Paraclete: An Epitaph for Heloisep. 307
A Last Epitaph at the Paraclete, 1780p. 309
Appendices
Institutiones Nostrae [Our Statutes]p. 313
MS T (Troyes, Bibliothèque municipal, MS 802): The Paraclete and the Early History of the Correspondence of Abelard and Heloisep. 317
Explanatory Notesp. 327
Bibliographyp. 349
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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