Catalogue

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A fleeting empire : early Stuart Britain and the merchant adventurers to Canada /
Andrew D. Nicholls.
imprint
Montréal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2010.
description
xxix, 246 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0773537783, 9780773537781
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montréal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2010.
isbn
0773537783
9780773537781
catalogue key
7265326
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [229]-238) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew Nicholls showcases the enterprises of knights and privateers alike, providing a fascinating account of early European colonies, commerce, and military, force in North America. A Fleeting Empire forces us to see the early histories of Canada and the United States in a new light.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Nicholls succeeds in providing students and scholars alike with a carefully researched and well-told investigation into the spectacular yet short-lived efforts and achievements of the Merchant Adventurers to Canada during the Early Stuart period." Michael F. Dove, University of Western Ontario
"This excellent book illuminates a neglected period of both British and Canadian history." Matthew Dziennik, University of Edinburgh
"Written in a clear, direct style, A Fleeting Empire is an impressive achievement. It will enlighten anyone interested in the history of the Atlantic world in the early 17th century." The Chronicle Herald
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'A Fleeting Empire' examines the lives and exploits of early European adventurers in North America, revealing the murky mix of self-interest, patriotism, and adventure that motivated them. It forces us to see the early histories of Canada and the United States in a new light.
Main Description
Before the future of North American rule was decided by the battle between British and French forces on the Plains of Abraham, Britain's emerging imperial interests were represented by ambitious merchants and privateers. A Fleeting Empire examines the lives and exploits of early European adventurers in North America, revealing the murky mix of self-interest, patriotism, and adventure that motivated them.
Main Description
Before the future of North American rule was decided by the battle between British and French forces on the Plains of Abraham, Britain's emerging imperial interests were represented by ambitious merchants and privateers. A Fleeting Empire examines the lives and exploits of early European adventurers in North America, revealing the murky mix of self-interest, patriotism, and adventure that motivated them.The union of the English and Scottish crowns in 1603 gave rise to a new British seafaring community, which the early Stuart monarchy used to pursue some of the first commercial and colonial ventures in North America. Among those who sailed across the Atlantic were the Kirke brothers, who in 1629 forced Samuel de Champlain's surrender of Quebec, Sir William Alexander of Menstrie, a rising political figure and patentee of Nova Scotia, and James Stewart of Killeith, leader of a colony on Cape Breton Island. King Charles I was more concerned with brokering a peace with France than looking To The new world, So the gains of the merchant adventurers were short-lived, but their adventures provide a tantalizing glimpse of a moment of British colonial control, suggesting what might have been.Andrew Nicholls showcases the enterprises of knights and privateers alike, providing a fascinating account of early European colonies, commerce, and military force in North America. A Fleeting Empire forces us to see the early histories of Canada And The United States in a new light.
Main Description
Before the future of North American rule was decided by the battle between British and French forces on the Plains of Abraham, Britain's emerging imperial interests were represented by ambitious merchants and privateers.A Fleeting Empireexamines the lives and exploits of early European adventurers in North America, revealing the murky mix of self-interest, patriotism, and adventure that motivated them. The union of the English and Scottish crowns in 1603 gave rise to a new British seafaring community, which the early Stuart monarchy used to pursue some of the first commercial and colonial ventures in North America. Among those who sailed across the Atlantic were the Kirke brothers, who in 1629 forced Samuel de Champlain's surrender of Quebec, Sir William Alexander of Menstrie, a rising political figure and patentee of Nova Scotia, and James Stewart of Killeith, leader of a colony on Cape Breton Island. King Charles I was more concerned with brokering a peace with France than looking To The new world, So the gains of the merchant adventurers were short-lived, but their adventures provide a tantalizing glimpse of a moment of British colonial control, suggesting what might have been. Andrew Nicholls showcases the enterprises of knights and privateers alike, providing a fascinating account of early European colonies, commerce, and military force in North America.A Fleeting Empireforces us to see the early histories of Canada And The United States in a new light.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: On Filling the Gapsp. xiii
The Huron Mission and the Promise of New Francep. 3
Early English and British Expeditions in the North Atlantic Theatrep. 19
King James VI/I and the Challenge of Anglo-Scottish Co-operationp. 36
The Poet Courtier: Sir William Alexander and His Charterp. 53
The Paper Colony: Charles's Privateers and the Proxy Warp. 69
The Demands of Honour and Charles I's Unfolding Strategyp. 87
A Man of Controversy: James Stewart of Killeith, Fourth Lord Ochiltreep. 102
Mixed Motives and the Company of Merchant Adventurers to Canadap. 119
Shifting Loyalties and the Case of the Embezzled Fursp. 136
Lord Ochiltree's Gamble and the Abandonment of Port Royalp. 149
The Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye and the End of a Partnershipp. 169
Epilogue: Not as Strangersp. 185
Conclusionp. 187
Notesp. 193
Bibliographyp. 229
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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