Catalogue


Catholic pirates and Greek merchants : a maritime history of the Mediterranean /
Molly Greene.
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2010.
description
xiv, 305 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0691141975 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780691141978 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2010.
isbn
0691141975 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780691141978 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Subjects and sovereigns -- The claims of religion -- The age of piracy -- The Ottoman Mediterranean -- The pursuit of justice -- At the Tribunale -- The turn toward Rome.
catalogue key
7264150
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [279]-290) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This book adds substantially to our understanding of those who inhabited the littoral of the Mediterranean Sea in the early modern period. At its center is the interaction between two sets of actors that have been largely overlooked in histories of the region. Greene tells a fascinating tale. Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchants fills a void in English language scholarship."-- Bruce A. Masters, Wesleyan University " Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchants addresses some crucial issues in the history of the early modern Mediterranean, putting forward a strong and important thesis regarding the early modern history not only of the Mediterranean but of Europe in general. It truly represents an excellent expansion of the work Greene has already done in this field and a significant contribution to Mediterranean history."-- Maria Fusaro, University of Exeter
Flap Copy
"This book adds substantially to our understanding of those who inhabited the littoral of the Mediterranean Sea in the early modern period. At its center is the interaction between two sets of actors that have been largely overlooked in histories of the region. Greene tells a fascinating tale. Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchants fills a void in English language scholarship."--Bruce A. Masters, Wesleyan University " Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchants addresses some crucial issues in the history of the early modern Mediterranean, putting forward a strong and important thesis regarding the early modern history not only of the Mediterranean but of Europe in general. It truly represents an excellent expansion of the work Greene has already done in this field and a significant contribution to Mediterranean history."--Maria Fusaro, University of Exeter
Flap Copy
"This book adds substantially to our understanding of those who inhabited the littoral of the Mediterranean Sea in the early modern period. At its center is the interaction between two sets of actors that have been largely overlooked in histories of the region. Greene tells a fascinating tale.Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchantsfills a void in English language scholarship."--Bruce A. Masters, Wesleyan University"Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchantsaddresses some crucial issues in the history of the early modern Mediterranean, putting forward a strong and important thesis regarding the early modern history not only of the Mediterranean but of Europe in general. It truly represents an excellent expansion of the work Greene has already done in this field and a significant contribution to Mediterranean history."--Maria Fusaro, University of Exeter
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-06-01:
For the most part, works on piracy during the period from approximately 1650 to 1730 concentrate on the Caribbean. Princeton historian Greene's study is particularly welcome, dealing as it does with a different sea, the eastern Mediterranean. Much has been written on maritime commerce in the area throughout the 16th and 17th centuries, but the focus of Greene's aggressively revisionist work is the struggle between the piratical Knights of Malta and Greek merchant seafarers. She tells a story of ambiguity. Jews and Muslims were easily classified as legitimate prey, but Greeks defied definition. As Ottoman citizens professing a dubious sort of Christianity, they existed in a perceptual limbo that earned them a vague measure of legal protection from the Knights, but denied them many of the rights accorded to other Christians. The book, which will have a profound effect on future European economic history, reexamines more than trade relations. Among Greene's many challenges to prevailing interpretations is her repudiation of the view that the Knights were a residual organization, a relic of the Crusades. Instead, she maintains, they represented a substantial revival of Catholic power in the eastern Mediterranean. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, faculty. B. R. Burg Arizona State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
This book adds substantially to our understanding of those who inhabited the littoral of the Mediterranean Sea in the early modern period. At its center is the interaction between two sets of actors that have been largely overlooked in histories of the region. Greene tells a fascinating tale.Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchantsfills a void in English language scholarship.
While Molly Greene has aimed this entertaining book primarily at the maritime historian (and she takes the word 'maritime' in the title very seriously), it is written in a style that would also appeal to the general reader of history. It adds substantially to our understanding of those who lived, worked and thieved their way around the Mediterranean Sea in the early modern period. -- Michael Clark, Northern Mariner
Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchantsaddresses some crucial issues in the history of the early modern Mediterranean, putting forward a strong and important thesis regarding the early modern history not only of the Mediterranean but of Europe in general. It truly represents an excellent expansion of the work Greene has already done in this field and a significant contribution to Mediterranean history.
While Molly Greene has aimed this entertaining book primarily at the maritime historian (and she takes the word 'maritime' in the title very seriously), it is written in a style that would also appeal to the general reader of history. It adds substantially to our understanding of those who lived, worked and thieved their way around the Mediterranean Sea in the early modern period.
"While Molly Greene has aimed this entertaining book primarily at the maritime historian (and she takes the word 'maritime' in the title very seriously), it is written in a style that would also appeal to the general reader of history. It adds substantially to our understanding of those who lived, worked and thieved their way around the Mediterranean Sea in the early modern period."-- Michael Clark, Northern Mariner
Joint Winner of the 2011 Runciman Award, Anglo-Hellenic League
The detailed descriptions and analyses of numerous cases taken from the files of the Tribunale degli Armamenti , which make up the bulk of the book's successive chapters, repay close reading.
"The detailed descriptions and analyses of numerous cases taken from the files of the Tribunale degli Armamenti , which make up the bulk of the book's successive chapters, repay close reading."-- Colin Heywood, International Journal of Maritime History
It was a happy event that led her to tell many of these stories in this book, which is scholarly, well written, and innovative--a worthy joint winner of the Runciman Award in 2011.
"It was a happy event that led her to tell many of these stories in this book, which is scholarly, well written, and innovative--a worthy joint winner of the Runciman Award in 2011."-- Michael Llewellyn Smith, Anglo Hellenic Review
"Greene has found wonderfully illuminating texts. . . . There is much useful material on the lives and dealings of individual merchants and consular agents across the Mediterranean."-- Diana Gilliland Wright, Journal of World History
Greene has found wonderfully illuminating texts. . . . There is much useful material on the lives and dealings of individual merchants and consular agents across the Mediterranean.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A new international maritime order was forged in the early modern age, yet until now histories of the period have dealt almost exclusively with the Atlantic and Indian oceans.Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchantsshifts attention to the Mediterranean, providing a major history of an important but neglected sphere of the early modern maritime world, and upending the conventional view of the Mediterranean as a religious frontier where Christians and Muslims met to do battle.Molly Greene investigates the conflicts between the Catholic pirates of Malta--the Knights of St. John--and their victims, the Greek merchants who traded in Mediterranean waters, and uses these conflicts as a window into an international maritime order that was much more ambiguous than has been previously thought. The Greeks, as Christian subjects to the Muslim Ottomans, were the very embodiment of this ambiguity. Much attention has been given to Muslim pirates such as the Barbary corsairs, with the focus on Muslim-on-Christian violence. Greene delves into the archives of Malta's pirate court--which theoretically offered redress to these Christian victims--to paint a considerably more complex picture and to show that pirates, far from being outside the law, were vital actors in the continuous negotiations of legality and illegality in the Mediterranean Sea.Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchantsbrings the Mediterranean and Catholic piracy into the broader context of early modern history, and sheds new light on commerce and the struggle for power in this volatile age.
Main Description
A new international maritime order was forged in the early modern age, yet until now histories of the period have dealt almost exclusively with the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchants shifts attention to the Mediterranean, providing a major history of an important but neglected sphere of the early modern maritime world, and upending the conventional view of the Mediterranean as a religious frontier where Christians and Muslims met to do battle. Molly Greene investigates the conflicts between the Catholic pirates of Malta--the Knights of St. John--and their victims, the Greek merchants who traded in Mediterranean waters, and uses these conflicts as a window into an international maritime order that was much more ambiguous than has been previously thought. The Greeks, as Christian subjects to the Muslim Ottomans, were the very embodiment of this ambiguity. Much attention has been given to Muslim pirates such as the Barbary corsairs, with the focus on Muslim-on-Christian violence. Greene delves into the archives of Malta's pirate court--which theoretically offered redress to these Christian victims--to paint a considerably more complex picture and to show that pirates, far from being outside the law, were vital actors in the continuous negotiations of legality and illegality in the Mediterranean Sea. Catholic Pirates and Greek Merchants brings the Mediterranean and Catholic piracy into the broader context of early modern history, and sheds new light on commerce and the struggle for power in this volatile age.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Molly Greene investigates the conflict between the Catholic pirates of Malta, the Knights of St. John, & the Greek merchants who traded in Mediterranean waters, & uses their antipathy as an illustration of a much more ambiguous international maritime order than has previously been conceived.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Subjects and Sovereignsp. 15
The Claims of Religionp. 52
The Age of Piracyp. 78
The Ottoman Mediterraneanp. 110
The Pursuit of Justicep. 138
At the Tribunalep. 167
The Turn toward Romep. 201
Conclusionp. 224
Notesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 279
Indexp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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