Catalogue


The young Nixon and his rivals : four California Republicans eye the White House, 1946-1958 /
James Worthen.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2010.
description
v, 233 p.
ISBN
0786441712 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786441716 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2010.
isbn
0786441712 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786441716 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Earl Warren : going his own way -- William Knowland : smooth ride to the top -- Goodwin Knight : charisma to spare -- Richard N ixon : a new kind of politician -- "Defending California from Goodie" -- The rivals and the Nixon-Douglas race -- The 1952 Republican convention -- Knowland, Nixon and the president, 1953-1955 -- The rivals and the 1956 convention -- The big switch of 1958 and the end of the rivalry.
abstract
"During his rise to national prominence, Richard Nixon was forced to confront the political ambitions of fellow Californians Earl Warren, William Knowland and Goodwin Knight. This book traces Nixon's relationships with them from 1946 until 1958, when the experienced vice president facilitated the self-destruction of his two most dangerous rivals"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7259833
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James Worthen writes about the impact of personality on political behavior. A former program manager at the Central Intelligence Agency in Washington, he currently lives in Pismo Beach, California.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-04-01:
Worthen traces a 12-year period in which four California Republicans vied for national prominence, a rivalry fueled by irreconcilable aspirations for the presidency. Worthen's theme is the impact of personality on politics, and the four protagonists prove worthy subjects. The Republican national convention of 1952 divides the study chronologically and thematically, with Governor Earl Warren the dominant figure prior to the convention; afterward, Nixon's election as vice president and Warren's appointment to the Supreme Court changed the dynamic among the four rivals. Goodwin Knight achieved his goal of succeeding Warren as governor, and Senator William Knowland contested control of California's Republicans. The other three held Nixon at arm's length, but he fared well in these complex relationships. Although the youngest, he outmaneuvered the others when their interests clashed, most notably undermining Warren's favorite-son candidacy among the California delegation at the 1952 Republican convention in favor of Eisenhower. Worthen calls Nixon "a skilled and sophisticated political operator." Ultimately, Warren and Nixon survived. In 1958, Senator Knowland returned to seek the governorship, pushing Knight aside. Knight, who had planned to run for reelection, ran for the Senate instead, but both men lost. Summing Up; Recommended. Most levels/libraries. A. J. Dunar University of Alabama in Huntsville
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
During his rise to national prominence, Richard Nixon was forced to confront the political ambitions of fellow Californians Earl Warren, William Knowland and Goodwin Knight, all of whom shared in his dream of becoming president. The simultaneous ascent of these four Republican politicians--dubbed the "four giants" by the regional and national media--led to intense personal rivalries which would affect presidential politics for more than a decade. This book traces Nixon's relationships with each man from 1946, when he was the least well-known of the four, until 1958, when the experienced vice president facilitated the self-destruction of his two most dangerous rivals. It is the story of a bitter competition moderated by common identity and shared party loyalty, focusing on the personal qualities which made each of these politicians so formidable--and so flawed.
Library of Congress Summary
"During his rise to national prominence, Richard Nixon was forced to confront the political ambitions of fellow Californians Earl Warren, William Knowland and Goodwin Knight. This book traces Nixon's relationships with them from 1946 until 1958, when the experienced vice president facilitated the self-destruction of his two most dangerous rivals"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
During his rise to national prominence, Richard Nixon as forced to confront the political ambitions of fellow Californians Earl Warren, William Knowland and Goodwin Knight, all of whom shared in his dream of becoming president. The simultaneous ascent of these four Republican politicians--dubbed the four giants by the regional and national media--led to intense personal rivalries which would affect presidential politics for more than a decade. This book traces Nixon's relationships with each man from 1946, when he was the least well-known of the four, until 1958, when the experienced vice president facilitated the self-destruction of his two most dangerous rivals. It is the story of a bitter competition moderated by common identity and shared party loyalty, focusing on the personal qualities which made each of these politicians so formidable--and so flawed.
Main Description
During his rise to national prominence, Richard Nixon was forced to confront the political ambitions of fellow Californians Earl Warren, William Knowland and Goodwin Knight, all of whom shared in his dream of becoming president. The simultaneous growth of these four Republican politicians--dubbed the four giants by the regional and national media--led to intense personal rivalries which would affect presidential politics for more than a decade. This book traces Nixon's relationships with each man from 1946, when he was the least well-known of the four, until 1958, when the experienced vice president facilitated the self-destruction of his two most dangerous rivals. It is the story of a bitter competition moderated by common identity and shared party loyalty, focusing on the personal qualities which made each of these politicians so formidable--and so flawed.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 1
Introductionp. 5
The Rivals in 1946
Earl Warren: Going His Own Wayp. 15
William Knowland: Smooth Ride to the Topp. 23
Goodwin Knight: Charisma to Sparep. 32
Richard Nixon: A New Kind of Politicianp. 38
The Rivals in Warren's Shadow (1946-1952)
"Defending California from Goodie"p. 50
The Rivals and the Nixon-Douglas Racep. 60
The Rivals Collide
The 1952 Republican Conventionp. 78
The Rivals Under Eisenhower (1953-1958)
Knowland, Nixon and the President, 1953-1955p. 118
The Rivals and the 1956 Conventionp. 136
The Big Switch of 1958 and the End of the Rivalryp. 168
Epiloguep. 189
Notesp. 205
Bibliographyp. 221
Indexp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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