Catalogue


Building states and markets : enterprise development in central Asia /
Gül Berna Özcan.
imprint
Basingstoke, England ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2010.
description
xxv, 291 p. : map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1403991618 (hbk.), 9781403991614 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Basingstoke, England ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2010.
isbn
1403991618 (hbk.)
9781403991614 (hbk.)
contents note
Introduction : building states and markets in Central Asia -- Market building and social stratification -- Entrepreneurs and their perceptions -- The political economy of bazaars -- The gendered economy -- Business interest representation -- International assistance and enterprise development -- Entrepreneurs as moral men -- Conclusion.
abstract
The transition economies of Central Asia are faced with a daunting challenge that modern capitalism offers: the move from vassal pseudo-states of the former Soviet Union to competitive nations. This title explores the first 15 years of economic emergence and assesses the capabilities of these countries to transform their economies.
catalogue key
7256841
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 268-285) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gl Berna zcan is Reader in International Business and Strategy in the School of Management at Royal Holloway, University of London, UK. She is the author of Small Firms and Economic Development and numerous articles on entrepreneurship, business analysis and the political economy of emerging markets. This book is based on cross-country research supported by the Nuffield Foundation, the Levehulme Trust, and a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship.
Reviews
Review Quotes
One of the least understood regions of the world, Central Asia is in the midst of a massive transformation from socialist command to capitalist development based on private initiative and ownership. The process involves the emergence of new markets, an entrepreneurial stratum, and new political institutions, including ones designed to provide rents to privileged groups. In this fascinating book, Gül Berna Özcan chronicles and critiques this unfolding revolution, with a focus on identifying the determinants of the region's institutional trajectory. Her analysis, which draws on an impressive array of sources, is lucid throughout. In exploring the commonalities of Central Asian development patterns, she never loses sight of the differences across the region's independent states. Building States and Markets can be read profitably and enjoyably by a wide range of intellectuals, including academics and policy makers. -- Timur Kuran, Professor of Economics and Political Science, and Gorter Family Professor of Islamic Studies, Duke University, USA A great book that contributes a much needed overview on entrepreneurship development in Central Asia. Özcan provides a knowledgeable study on how an entrepreneurial class emerged in this region, thus adding fresh insights on entrepreneurship in a transition context. I found the case vignettes of entrepreneurs throughout the book particularly interesting: they demonstrate the diversity of entrepreneurship in Central Asia and its (Soviet) roots and also illustrate how enterprising individuals cope with a less than favourable business environment, thus highlighting their fundamental role in changing Central Asian economies and societies.-- Friederike Welter, Jönköping International Business School, Sweden and TeliaSonera Professorship for Entrepreneurship at Stockholm School of Economics in Riga, Latvia
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Summaries
Main Description
This book examines the emerging entrepreneurial middle class and their relationship with the state and market building in post-Soviet Central Asia. A new entrepreneurial class occupies a central position of balance between the growing poor and disfranchised population and an increasingly unaccountable bureaucratic regime entangled with business groups and oligarchs in state-society relationships. Studying the patterns of enterprise development and entrepreneurship in relation to emerging autocratic and oligarchic control built into states and markets deserves much attention. Although new business owners form a heterogeneous group showing diverse regional, ethnic and social characteristics, these entrepreneurs of Central Asia provide the single most important source of social stability and cohesion in the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union. This study provides a range of analysis looking at enterprise development and entrepreneurship within national, regional and sectoral contexts with rich empirical data collected from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The transition economies of Central Asia are faced with a daunting challenge that modern capitalism offers: the move from vassal pseudo-states of the former Soviet Union to competitive nations. This title explores the first 15 years of economic emergence and assesses the capabilities of these countries to transform their economies.
Main Description
This book examines the emerging entrepreneurial middle class and their relationship with the state and market building in post-Soviet Central Asia. A new entrepreneurial class occupies a central position of balance between the growing poor and disfranchised population and an increasingly unaccountable bureaucratic regime entangled with business groups and oligarchs in state-society relationships. Studying the patterns of enterprise development and entrepreneurship in relation to emerging autocratic and oligarchic control built into states and markets deserves much attention. Although new business owners form a heterogeneous group showing diverse regional, ethnic and social characteristics, these entrepreneurs of Central Asia provide the single most important source of social stability and cohesion in the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union. This study provides a range of analysis looking at enterprise development and entrepreneurship within national, regional and sectoral contexts with rich empirical data collected from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.GUL BERNA OZCAN is Reader in International Business and Strategy in the School of Management at Royal Holloway, University of London. She is the author of Small Firms and Economic Development and numerous articles on entrepreneurship, business analysis and the political economy of emerging markets. This book is based on cross-country research supported by the Nuffield Foundation, the Leverhulme Trust, and a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship.
Main Description
The transition economies of Central Asia are faced with the most daunting challenge that modern capitalism offers: the move from vassal pseudo-states of the former Soviet Union to competitive nations, some even members of the World Trade Organization. This book explores the first fifteen years of economic emergence and assesses the capabilities of these countries to transform their economies into competitive, market-driven systems. It is the first of its kind and will be highly useful for scholars, policy makers and donor agencies interested in Central Asia.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xxiii
Mapp. xxvi
Introduction: Building States and Markets in Central Asiap. 1
Market Building and Social Stratificationp. 30
Entrepreneurs and their Perceptionsp. 59
The Political Economy of Bazaarsp. 96
The Gendered Economyp. 122
Business Interest Representationp. 146
International Assistance and Enterprise Developmentp. 169
Entrepreneurs as Moral Menp. 191
Conclusionp. 220
Appendixp. 237
Notesp. 239
Referencesp. 268
Indexp. 286
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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