Catalogue

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Sentimental literature and Anglo-Scottish identity, 1745-1820 /
Juliet Shields.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
viii, 224 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521190940 (Cloth), 9780521190947 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
0521190940 (Cloth)
9780521190947 (Cloth)
abstract
"What did it mean to be British, and more specifically to feel British, in the century following the parliamentary union of Scotland and England? Juliet Shields departs from recent accounts of the Romantic emergence of nationalism by recovering the terms in which eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century writers understood nationhood. She argues that in the wake of the turmoil surrounding the Union, Scottish writers appealed to sentiment, or refined feeling, to imagine the nation as a community. They sought to transform a Great Britain united by political and economic interests into one united by shared sympathies, even while they used the gendered and racial connotations of sentiment to differentiate sharply between Scottish, English, and British identities. By moving Scotland from the margins to the center of literary history, the book explores how sentiment shaped both the development of British identity and the literature within which writers responded creatively to the idea of nationhood"--
catalogue key
7256653
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 204-220) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[Shields] scarcely mentions a text without offering a striking new insight into it. This book is an impressive achievement." -Richard Cronin, University of Glasgow, NBOL 19
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Examining the literary negotiation of Anglo-Scottish relations in the century following the 1707 Union between Scotland's and England's parliaments, this text explores the unexpected connections between the development of sentimental literature and British nationhood.
Description for Bookstore
Examines the literary negotiation of Anglo-Scottish relations in the century following the 1707 Union between Scotland's and England's parliaments. By tracing Scottish sentiment from Jacobite poetry and Enlightenment history to late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century fiction, Juliet Shields explores the unexpected connections between the development of sentimental literature and British nationhood.
Main Description
What did it mean to be British, and more specifically to feel British, in the century following the parliamentary union of Scotland and England? Juliet Shields departs from recent accounts of the Romantic emergence of nationalism by recovering the terms in which eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century writers understood nationhood. She argues that in the wake of the turmoil surrounding the Union, Scottish writers appealed to sentiment, or refined feeling, to imagine the nation as a community. They sought to transform a Great Britain united by political and economic interests into one united by shared sympathies, even while they used the gendered and racial connotations of sentiment to differentiate sharply between Scottish, English, and British identities. By moving Scotland from the margins to the center of literary history, the book explores how sentiment shaped both the development of British identity and the literature within which writers responded creatively to the idea of nationhood.
Table of Contents
Introduction. The sentiments and politics of Union
The Ossian controversy and the racial beginnings of Britain
British masculinity and Scottish self-control
Sentimental correspondences and the boundaries of British identity
National tales and domestication of the Scottish Highlands
Rebellions and re-unions in the historical novel
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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