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Opening doors : the untold story of Cornelia Sorabji, reformer, lawyer and champion of women's rights in India /
Richard Sorabji.
imprint
London ; New York : I. B. Tauris, 2010.
description
xxi, 487 p. : ill., map, geneal. table ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1848853750 (hbk.), 9781848853751 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : I. B. Tauris, 2010.
isbn
1848853750 (hbk.)
9781848853751 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7256193
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Richard Sorabji does not just tell the story of a woman who will wake up historians. His work on Cornelia Sorabji's letters and diaries and his understanding, as her nephew, of her relations with her family, enables him to examine another paradox, always fascinating to biographers: that of the intelligent and strong woman who, despite her clarity of understanding, allows emotional entanglements to derail her career. 'Opening Doors' is a startling example of biography through history and history through biography." -- Janet Morgan, author of Edwina Mountbatten: A Life of Her Own
"Richard Sorabji does not just tell the story of a woman who will wake up historians. His work on Cornelia Sorabji's letters and diaries and his understanding, as her nephew, of her relations with her family, enables him to examine another paradox, always fascinating to biographers: that of the intelligent and strong woman who, despite her clarity of understanding, allows emotional entanglements to derail her career. 'Opening Doors' is a startling example of biography through history and history through biography."--Janet Morgan, author ofEdwina Mountbatten: A Life of Her Own
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Cornelia Sorabji, India's first female lawyer, was a truly remarkable woman. She was an Indian whose loyalty to the British Raj never wavered. A passionate advocate of women's rights whose own career was nearly compromised through her inappropriate relationships with married men. This is her story.
Main Description
Clever, attractive and ambitious, intellectually daring and physically courageous, Cornelia Sorabji was a truly remarkable woman. As India's first female lawyer, she was original and often outspoken in her views -- for example, in her criticism of Gandhi and her surprising friendship with Katherine Mayo. Cornelia Sorabji resists easy classification, either as a feminist or as an imperialist. An Indian whose loyalty to the British Raj never wavered. A passionate advocate of women's rights whose own career was nearly compromised through her inappropriate relationship with a married man. An independent and free-thinking intellectual who depended for work on patronage from an elite circle. Cornelia Sorabji's long and fulfilling life was anything but simple. How did she reconcile these apparent contradictions? How did she succeed in opening doors to aspects of Indian and British life which remain closed to so many, even today -- and where did she run into difficulties? Through its beguiling portrait of a determined and pioneering woman at the heart of the Raj, this rich and important story will captivate everyone with an interest in Indian or British history.
Main Description
Clever, attractive and ambitious, intellectually daring and physically courageous, Cornelia Sorabji was a truly remarkable woman. As India's first female lawyer, she was original and often outspoken in her views -- for example, in her criticism of Gandhi and her surprising friendship with Katherine Mayo. Cornelia Sorabji resists easy classification, either as a feminist or as an imperialist. An Indian whose loyalty to the British Raj never wavered. A passionate advocate of women's rights whose own career was nearly compromised through her inappropriate relationship with a married man. An independent and free-thinking intellectual who depended for work on patronage from an elite circle. Cornelia Sorabji's long and fulfilling life was anything but simple. How did she reconcile these apparent contradictions? How did she succeed in opening doors to aspects of Indian and British life which remain closed to so many, even today -- and where did she run into difficulties?Through its beguiling portrait of a determined and pioneering woman at the heart of the Raj, this rich and important story will captivate everyone with an interest in Indian or British history.
Main Description
Clever, attractive and ambitious, intellectually daring and physically courageous, Cornelia Sorabji was a truly remarkable woman. As India's first female lawyer, she was original and often outspoken in her views -- for example, in her criticism of Gandhi and her surprising friendship with Katherine Mayo. Cornelia Sorabji resists easy classification, either as a feminist or as an imperialist. An Indian whose loyalty to the British Raj never wavered. A passionate advocate of women's rights whose own career was nearly compromised through her inappropriate relationship with a married man. An independent and free-thinking intellectual who depended for work on patronage from an elite circle. Cornelia Sorabji's long and fulfilling life was anything but simple. How did she reconcile these apparent contradictions? How did she succeed in opening doors to aspects of Indian and British lifewhich remain closed to so many, even today -- and where did she run into difficulties? Through its beguiling portrait of a determined and pioneering woman at the heart of the Raj, this rich and important story will captivate everyone with an interest in Indian or British history.
Main Description
Clever, attractive and ambitious, intellectually daring and physically courageous, Cornelia Sorabji was a truly remarkable woman. As India's first female lawyer, she was original and often outspoken in her views - for example, in her criticism of Gandhi and her surprising friendship with Katherine Mayo. Cornelia Sorabji resists easy classification, either as a feminist or as an imperialist. An Indian whose loyalty to the British Raj never wavered. A passionate advocate of women's rights whose own career was nearly compromised through her inappropriate relationship with a married man. An independent and free-thinking intellectual who depended for work on patronage from an élite circle. Cornelia Sorabji's long and fulfilling life was anything but simple. How did she reconcile these apparent contradictions? How did she succeed in opening doors to aspects of Indian and British life which remain closed to so many, even today - and where did she run into difficulties? Through its beguiling portrait of a determined and pioneering woman at the heart of the Raj, this rich and important story will captivate everyone with an interest in Indian or British history.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Introductionp. ix
Map of Indiap. xviii
Family Treep. xxi
Preparation and Background from 1866
Parents and Family and Move to Oxfordp. 3
The Oxford University of Benjamin Jowett 1889-1892p. 22
London: Glamorous Introductions and Legal Experience, 1892-1893p. 56
Ten Year Campaign for a Legal Position, 1894-1904
Women's Rights in Princely States and Allahabad 1894-1899p. 67
Love and Exile to Englandp. 90
Life in Exile: Artists, Writers and London Society 1901-1904p. 104
A Door Opens: The Times and the Secretary of State against the Viceroy and the Rest 1904p. 119
Legal Adviser for Women Behind the Curtain
Four Early Estates, 1904-1906: Narhan, Tajhat, Churamaon, Kasimbazarp. 141
Settling Down in Calcutta: Early Years from 1904p. 168
The Ramgarh Rescue and the Expansion of Tasks, 1906-1922p. 182
The Joys and Dangers of Travelp. 201
Purdahnashin Attitudes: Cornelia's Learning before Teachingp. 209
Friends and Foes: The Cost of Overriding British Officers and Retirement to England
Two Self-Confessed Terrorists Rewarded, 1908 and 1914p. 229
From Glowing Reports to Quarrels Behind the Curtain of the British Raj, 1913-1917p. 238
Skulduggery Over Terms of Employment for an Indian Woman, 1914-1922p. 253
Dick, Cornelia and Family, England Calling 1913-1922p. 265
Return to India: The Bar, Social Work and Politics
Barrister in Calcutta, 1924-1929: Misogyny, Sabotage, Failure and Successp. 287
The Mayo Debacle, 1927p. 303
Social Service, 1924-1931: The Innovation of Purdahnashins as Social Workersp. 314
Cornelia's First Reactions to Gandhi and Relations with Other Nationalist Leadersp. 325
Interest Groups at the Round Table Conferences: Gandhi Interviewed, Ambedkar Entertained, Princes and the Orthodox Represented 1930-1932p. 341
Cornelia's Criticism of British Protection of Women in the Princely States, 1925-1938p. 354
Finale
Second World War, 1939-1946: Ablaze in London's Inns of Courtp. 369
Retrospectp. 379
Appendices
Alice and Cornelia's Other Sistersp. 387
Official Reports by the Court of Wards on Cornelia's Work, 1904-1909p. 411
Structure of Administration in British India and Princely Statesp. 413
Chronology of Cornelia's Lifep. 415
Cornelia's Principal Books and Abbreviationsp. 419
Glossaryp. 421
Notesp. 423
Indexp. 477
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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