Catalogue


Abandoning historical conflict? : former political prisoners and reconciliation in Northern Ireland /
Peter Shirlow ... [et al.].
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, c2010.
description
x, 195 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0719080118 (hbk.), 9780719080111 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, c2010.
isbn
0719080118 (hbk.)
9780719080111 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7253533
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Peter Shirlow is Senior Lecturer in the School of Law at Queen's University Belfast Jonathan Tonge is Professor of Politics at the University of Liverpool James McAuley is Professor of Sociology and Irish Studies at the University of Huddersfield Catherine McGlynn is Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Huddersfield
Summaries
Main Description
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this is a major analysis of why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace. Most accounts of the peace process are "top-down," relying upon the views of political elites. This book is "bottom-up," analyzing the voices of those who actually "fought the war." What made them fight, why did they stop and what are the lessons for other conflict zones? Using unrivalled access to members of the armed groups, the book offering a critical appraisal of one-dimensional accounts of the onset of peace, grounded in "mutually hurting stalemate" and "ripeness," which downgrade the political and economic aspects of conflict. Military stalemate had been evident since the early 1970s and offers little in explaining the timing of the peace process. Moreover, republicans and loyalists based their ceasefires upon very different perceptions of transformation or victory. Based on a Leverhulme Trust project and written by an expert team,Abandoning Histroical Conflict'offers a new analysis, based on subtle interplays of military, political, economic and personal changes and experiences. Combined, these allowed combatants to move from violence to peace whilst retaining core ideological beliefs and maintaining long-term constitutional visions. Former prisoners now act as ambassadors for peace in Northern Ireland. Knowledge of why and how combatants switched to peaceful methodologies amid widespread skepticism over prospects for peace is essential to our understanding of the management of global peace processes. Abandoning Histroical Conflict'is essential reading for policy-makers, academics, students and anyone with an interest in how war can become peace.
Main Description
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this is a major analysis of why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace. Most accounts of the peace process are ‘top-down’, relying upon the views of political elites. This book is ‘bottom-up’, analysing the voices of those who actually ‘fought the war’. What made them fight, why did they stop and what are the lessons for other conflict zones?Using unrivalled access to members of the armed groups, the book offering a critical appraisal of one-dimensional accounts of the onset of peace, grounded in ‘mutually hurting stalemate’ and ‘ripeness’, which downgrade the political and economic aspects of conflict. Military stalemate had been evident since the early 1970s and offers little in explaining the timing of the peace process. Moreover, republicans and loyalists based their ceasefires upon very different perceptions of transformation or victory.Based on a Leverhulme Trust project and written by an expert team, Abandoning Conflict offers a new analysis, based on subtle interplays of military, political, economic and personal changes and experiences. Combined, these allowed combatants to move from violence to peace whilst retaining core ideological beliefs and maintaining long-term constitutional visions.Former prisoners now act as ambassadors for peace in Northern Ireland. Knowledge of why and how combatants switched to peaceful methodologies amid widespread skepticism over prospects for peace is essential to our understanding of the management of global peace processes. Abandoning Conflict is essential reading for policy-makers, academics, students and anyone with an interest in how war can become peace.
Main Description
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this is a major analysis of why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace. Most accounts of the peace process are "top-down," relying upon the views of political elites. This book is "bottom-up," analyzing the voices of those who actually "fought the war." What made them fight, why did they stop and what are the lessons for other conflict zones? Using unrivalled access to members of the armed groups, the book offering a critical appraisal of one-dimensional accounts of the onset of peace, grounded in "mutually hurting stalemate" and "ripeness," which downgrade the political and economic aspects of conflict. Military stalemate had been evident since the early 1970s and offers little in explaining the timing of the peace process. Moreover, republicans and loyalists based their ceasefires upon very different perceptions of transformation or victory. Based on a Leverhulme Trust project and written by an expert team, Abandoning Histroical Conflict? offers a new analysis, based on subtle interplays of military, political, economic and personal changes and experiences. Combined, these allowed combatants to move from violence to peace whilst retaining core ideological beliefs and maintaining long-term constitutional visions. Former prisoners now act as ambassadors for peace in Northern Ireland. Knowledge of why and how combatants switched to peaceful methodologies amid widespread skepticism over prospects for peace is essential to our understanding of the management of global peace processes. Abandoning Histroical Conflict? is essential reading for policy-makers, academics, students and anyone with an interest in how war can become peace.
Main Description
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this is a major analysis of why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace. Most accounts of the peace process are 'top-down', relying upon the views of political elites. This book is 'bottom-up', analysing the voices of those who actually 'fought the war'. What made them fight, why did they stop and what are the lessons for other conflict zones?Based on a Leverhulme Trust project and written by an expert team, the book offers a new analysis, based on subtle interplays of military, political, economic and personal changes and experiences. Combined, these allowed combatants to move from violence to peace whilst retaining core ideological beliefs and maintaining long-term constitutional visions.
Main Description
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this is a major analysis of why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace. Most accounts of the peace process are #145;top-down#146;, relying upon the views of political elites. This book is #145;bottom-up#146;, analysing the voices of those who actually #145;fought the war#146;. What made them fight, why did they stop and what are the lessons for other conflict zones?Using unrivalled access to members of the armed groups, the book offering a critical appraisal of one-dimensional accounts of the onset of peace, grounded in #145;mutually hurting stalemate#146; and #145;ripeness#146;, which downgrade the political and economic aspects of conflict. Military stalemate had been evident since the early 1970s and offers little in explaining the timing of the peace process. Moreover, republicans and loyalists based their ceasefires upon very different perceptions of transformation or victory.Based on a Leverhulme Trust project and written by an expert team, Abandoning Conflict offers a new analysis, based on subtle interplays of military, political, economic and personal changes and experiences. Combined, these allowed combatants to move from violence to peace whilst retaining core ideological beliefs and maintaining long-term constitutional visions.Former prisoners now act as ambassadors for peace in Northern Ireland. Knowledge of why and how combatants switched to peaceful methodologies amid widespread skepticism over prospects for peace is essential to our understanding of the management of global peace processes. Abandoning Conflict is essential reading for policy-makers, academics, students and anyone with an interest in how war can become peace.
Main Description
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this is a major analysis of why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace. Most accounts of the peace process are #145;top-down#146;, relying upon the views of political elites. This book is #145;bottom-up#146;, analysing the voices of those who actually #145;fought the war#146;. What made them fight, why did they stop and what are the lessons for other conflict zones? Based on a Leverhulme Trust project and written by an expert team, the book offers a new analysis, based on subtle interplays of military, political, economic and personal changes and experiences. Combined, these allowed combatants to move from violence to peace whilst retaining core ideological beliefs and maintaining long-term constitutional visions.
Description for Bookstore
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this is a major analysis of why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace. Using unrivalled access to members of the armed groups, the book offering a critical appraisal of one-dimensional accounts of the onset of peace, grounded in "mutually hurting stalemate" and "ripeness," which downgrade the political and economic aspects of conflict. Based on a Leverhulme Trust project and written by an expert team,Abandoning Histroical Conflict'offers a new analysis, based on subtle interplays of military, political, economic and personal changes and experiences.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing on over 150 interviews with former IRA, INLA, UVF and UFF prisoners, this text analyses why Northern Ireland has seen a transition from war to peace.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Politically motivated prisoners in Northern Irelandp. 4
Former prisoners in a global contextp. 23
Political views and understandingsp. 45
Imprisonment, ideological development and changep. 69
Political and tactical change among former prisonersp. 91
Conflict transformation and changing perceptions of the 'other'p. 119
Former prisoners and societal reconstructionp. 142
Conclusionp. 164
Bibliographyp. 173
Indexp. 190
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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