Catalogue

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Community rights, conservation and contested land : the politics of natural resource governance in Africa /
edited by Fred Nelson.
imprint
London ; Washington, D.C. : Earthscan, 2010.
description
xvii, 342 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
9781844079162 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
London ; Washington, D.C. : Earthscan, 2010.
isbn
9781844079162 (hardback)
catalogue key
7251680
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Fred Nelson has worked as a scholar and practitioner on natural resource governance in east Africa for over ten years. He has worked in the field with local communities in northern Tanzania to establish more equitable and beneficial resource governance arrangements and has researched the political economy of natural resource management across east and southern Africa. His work has been published in journals such as Conservation Biology, Development Change and Biodiversity Conservation.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-12-01:
Contributors to this work have dual perspectives based on their theoretical training and practical experience, and thus are able to examine issues with a critical eye. This four-part work begins with general introductory information on African resource governance. Part 2 contains four chapters on community rights to and use of forest and wildlife resources in Botswana, Tanzania, Kenya, and Namibia; these can be read as a group, allowing readers to compare differences in policy, implementation, and results. The chapters are similar enough to illustrate the tensions between policy and implementation and between local and national interests for each country. Subtopics include national objectives and the role of NGOs and aid agencies. Each of the six chapters in part 3 analyze a specific community-based natural resource management program. Many emphasize the power and political struggles between the many levels of government and society and their influence on the successes and failures of each project. Part 4 is a short look at the future of land rights and natural resources. The well-edited book brings continuity to the development of central ideas, but chapters can still be read separately. Most material does not duplicate journal articles. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals; general readers. B. D. Orr Michigan Technological University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'An extremely useful and up to date analysis of community natural resource management in Africa.'William M. (Bill) Adams, Moran Professor of Conservation and Development, University of Cambridge, UK
'An extremely useful and up to date analysis of community natural resource management in Africa.' William M. (Bill) Adams, Moran Professor of Conservation and Development, University of Cambridge, UK 'I recommend this book to students and practitioners with an interest in conservation or environmental management and, especially, political and environmental anthropology. The book will be a useful addition to any academic library.' Andreja Phillips, Australasian Journal of Environmental Management
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume examines the dynamics of natural resource governance processes through a range of comparative case studies across east and southern Africa, in an effort to better understand the factors that account for the different outcomes of reform efforts in different contexts.
Main Description
Natural resource governance is central to the outcomes of biodiversity conservation efforts and to patterns of economic development, particularly in resource-dependent rural communities. The institutional arrangements that define natural resource governance are outcomes of political processes, whereby numerous groups with often-divergent interests negotiate for access to and control over resources. These political processes determine the outcomes of resource governance reform efforts, such as widespread attempts to decentralize or devolve greater tenure over land and resources to local communities. This volume examines the dynamics of natural resource governance processes through a range of comparative case studies across east and southern Africa, in an effort to better understand the factors that account for the different outcomes of reform efforts in different contexts. These cases examine issues such as land tenure, of tourism development, and wildlife conservation, and participatory forest management, and are drawn from the work of both academics and field practitioners from across the region. .
Main Description
Natural resource governance is central to the outcomes of biodiversity conservation efforts and to patterns of economic development, particularly in resource-dependent rural communities. The institutional arrangements that define natural resource governance are outcomes of political processes, whereby numerous groups with often-divergent interests negotiate for access to and control over resources. These political processes determine the outcomes of resource governance reform efforts, such as widespread attempts to decentralize or devolve greater tenure over land and resources to local communities. This volume examines the political dynamics of natural resource governance processes through a range of comparative case studies across east and southern Africa. These cases include both local and national settings, and examine issues such as land rights, tourism development, wildlife conservation, participatory forest management, and the impacts of climate change, and are drawn from both academics and field practitioners working across the region. Published with IUCN, The Bradley Fund for the Environment, SASUSG and Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Table of Contents
List of Figures, Tables and Boxesp. vii
List of Contributorsp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
Acronyms and Abbreviationsp. xv
Introduction
Introduction: The Politics of Natural Resource Governance in Africap. 3
Agrarian Social Change and Post-Colonial Natural Resource Management Interventions in Southern Africa's 'Communal Tenure' Regimesp. 32
Political Economies of Natural Resource Governance
The Politics of Community-Based Natural Resource Management in Botswanap. 55
Peasants' Forests and the King's Game? Institutional Divergence and Convergence in Tanzania's Forestry and Wildlife Sectorsp. 79
The Evolution of Namibia's Communal Conservanciesp. 106
Historic and Contemporary Struggles for a Local Wildlife Governance Regime in Kenyap. 121
Local Struggles and Negotiations across Multiple Scales
Windows of Opportunity or Exclusion? Local Communities in the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area, South Africap. 147
'People are Not Happy': Crisis, Adaptation and Resilience in Zimbabwe's CAMPFIRE Programmep. 174
The Rise and Fall of Community-Based Natural Resource Management in Zambia's Luangwa Valley: An Illustration of Micro- and Macro-Governance Issuesp. 202
External Agency and Local Authority: Facilitating CBNRM in Mahel, Mozambiquep. 227
Adaptive or Anachronistic? Maintaining Indigenous Natural Resource Governance Systems in Northern Botswanap. 241
Pastoral Activists: Negotiating Power Imbalances in the Tanzanian Serengetip. 269
Looking Forward
A Changing Climate for Community Resource Governance: Threats and Opportunities from Climate Change and the Emerging Carbon Marketp. 293
Democratizing Natural Resource Governance: Searching for Institutional Changep. 310
Index
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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