Catalogue


Learning capitalist culture : deep in the heart of tejas /
Douglas E. Foley.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.
description
viii, 248 p.
ISBN
0812220986 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780812220988 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.
isbn
0812220986 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780812220988 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
The civil rights movement comes to town -- The great American football ritual -- Finding an identity in the social status scene -- Working and playing around in the classroom -- Looking back on the 1970s : an epilogue -- Constructing a class culture theory of schooling -- Reflections of a white anthropologist on fieldwork.
catalogue key
7235208
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Douglas E. Foley examines the way in which these youth learn traditional American values through participation in sports, membership in formal and informal social groups, dating, and interactions with teachers in the classroom. Foley shows how the rituals involved in these activities tend to preserve or reproduce class and gender inequalities, even as Mexicanos transform the racial order. This edition contains updated sections on theory and field methods, as well as an epilogue that revisits many of the characters in the original ethnographic research.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-05:
Foley describes the lives, the culture, and the values of the inhabitants of small, rather poor, ethnically mixed South Texas town in the mid 1970s through the eyes of its high school youth. Foley divides his study into two sections. The first, a straightforward ethnography written for the general public, is by far, the most appealing and comprises the largest part of the book. The second (which is confined to the appendix) is a discussion of methodology aimed at a scholarly audience. Those interested in Marxist and especially post-Marxist class analysis may find this section stimulating, especially the debate between Foley and Paul Willis, the author of the foreword. Foley defines ethnography as "a record of the ethnographer's experience with a group of people." He selects high school students as the group for his study because of his conviction that high schools are the "site where American popular culture is enacted." Foley examines all aspects of the social life of his subjects--athletics, dating patterns, classroom behavior--and focuses especially on the divisions within this group--ethnic (Mexican American and Anglo American), class, and high school social clique (jocks, band students, and others). Descriptions of the interactions among these factions, and their differing (but occasionally suprisingly similar) values and patterns of behavior are fascinating, and will take most readers back to their high school days. The only flaws here are that Foley occasionally seems more concerned with being accepted as "cool" by his subjects than with analyzing them, and he tends to accept their publicly expressed attitudes--especially those towards women--at face value rather than as adolescent braggadocio. On the whole, though, this is a fascinating study of the clash between Anglo and Hispanic cultures in South Texas as seen through the eyes of its youth. All levels. C. D. Wintz Texas Southern University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fascinating study of the clash between Anglo and Hispanic cultures in South Texas as seen through the eyes of its youth."--Choice
" Learning Capitalist Cultureposes excellent questions and offers provocative theoretical possibilities."- American Journal of Sociology
"A fascinating study of the clash between Anglo and Hispanic cultures in South Texas as seen through the eyes of its youth."- Choice
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Building on the author's thirty-six years of experience with North Town, this second edition ofLearning Capitalist Culturepresents an updated ethnographic study of the small, economically depressed, predominantly Mexican American south Texas town. Like many communities in the Southwest, North Town has undergone significant cultural and political change since the late 1960s, when the Chicano civil rights movement emerged and challenged the segregated racial order. The resulting racial confrontation between Mexicanos and Anglos created new tensions and problems for North Town youth. Douglas E. Foley examines the way in which these youth learn traditional American values through participation in sports, membership in formal and informal social groups, dating, and interactions with teachers in the classroom. Foley shows how the rituals involved in these activities tend to preserve or reproduce class and gender inequalities, even as Mexicanos transform the racial order. This edition contains updated sections on theory and field methods, as well as an epilogue that revisits many of the characters in the original ethnographic research.
Main Description
Building on the author's thirty-six years of experience with North Town, this second edition of Learning Capitalist Culturepresents an updated ethnographic study of the small, economically depressed, predominantly Mexican American south Texas town. Like many communities in the Southwest, North Town has undergone significant cultural and political change since the late 1960s, when the Chicano civil rights movement emerged and challenged the segregated racial order. The resulting racial confrontation between Mexicanos and Anglos created new tensions and problems for North Town youth. Douglas E. Foley examines the way in which these youth learn traditional American values through participation in sports, membership in formal and informal social groups, dating, and interactions with teachers in the classroom. Foley shows how the rituals involved in these activities tend to preserve or reproduce class and gender inequalities, even as Mexicanos transform the racial order. This edition contains updated sections on theory and field methods, as well as an epilogue that revisits many of the characters in the original ethnographic research.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. vii
The Civil Rights Movement Comes to Townp. 1
The Great American Football Ritualp. 28
Finding an Identity in the Social Status Scenep. 63
Working and Playing Around in the Classroomp. 101
Looking Back on the 1970s: An Epiloguep. 135
Constructing a Class Culture Theory of Schoolingp. 173
Reflections of a White Anthropologist on Fieldworkp. 207
Appendix: Data Tablesp. 229
Referencesp. 231
Indexp. 243
Acknowledgmentsp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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