Catalogue


Oswald Mosley and the new party /
Matthew Worley.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
viii, 234 p.
ISBN
0230206972 (hardback), 9780230206977 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230206972 (hardback)
9780230206977 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction: Failures: The New Party in History -- Here are the Young Men: The New Party in Context -- From Reform to Revolution: New Party Policy -- Visions of the Near Future: New Party Ideology -- A Party of a New Type? New Party Organisation -- London Calling: Journeys through and around the New Party -- Going into Battle: The New Party and Public Politics -- Outside the Gate: Alternative Routes to Power -- Leaders of Men: Masculinity and the Promise of a New Life -- Hurrah for the Greyshirts: The New Party and Fascism -- Conclusion: A Life of Contradiction: Mosley and the New Party -- Bibliography -- Index.
abstract
"Formed by Sir Oswald Mosley in 1931, the New Party's aimed to solve the economic problems of interwar Britain, but faced opposition from the labour movement and accusations of fascism. This book traces Mosley's move from socialist Labour MP to blackshirted fascist, and assesses the New Party's attempt to realign British politics between the wars"--
catalogue key
7235172
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Matthew Worley is Reader in History at the University of Reading, UK. He has published several books and articles relating to interwar British political history and communist history. He is currently co-editor of Twentieth Century Communism.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Matthew Worley's reconstruction of Oswald Mosley's New Party is a welcome addition to the historiography on inter-war British politics. Until now, no historian has studied the New Party on its own terms in this detail. The book is well written and it will appeal to undergraduate students because it serves as a good introduction to the fractious political culture that shaped the 1931 political crisis. But political historians should also read the book. Worley adds new flesh to the bones of a familiar story and he has used his intimate knowledge of the New Party to explore broader historical debates about the importance of 'generations' in this period and the relationship between fascism and modernism." Gary Love , Twentieth Century British History
"Matthew Worley's reconstruction of Oswald Mosley's New Party is a welcome addition to the historiography on inter-war British politics. Until now, no historian has studied the New Party on its own terms in this detail. The book is well written and it will appeal to undergraduate students because it serves as a good introduction to the fractious political culture that shaped the 1931 political crisis. But political historians should also read the book. Worley adds new flesh to the bones of a familiar story and he has used his intimate knowledge of the New Party to explore broader historical debates about the importance of 'generations' in this period and the relationship between fascism and modernism." Gary Love,Twentieth Century British History
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Summaries
Main Description
Formed by Sir Oswald Mosley in 1931, the New Party's aimed to solve the economic problems of interwar Britain, but faced opposition from the labour movement and accusations of fascism. This book traces Mosley's move from socialist Labour MP to blackshirted fascist, and assesses the New Party's attempt to realign British politics between the wars.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This full-length study of the organization that incubated Britain's most provocative and successful fascist movement explores Sir Oswald Mosley's secession from Labour, his evolving politics and his eventual embrace of fascism.
Description for Bookstore
The first full-length study of the organization that incubated Britain's most provocative and successful fascist movement, exploring Oswald Mosley's transformation from Labour politician to fascist
Long Description
In 1931, as Britain's economy sunk further into depression, Sir Oswald Mosley made a fateful decision. Having served in Ramsay MacDonald's minority Labour government, he chose to secede from the Labour Party and launch a new political initiative. This was the New Party, inspired by the economic theories of John Maynard Keynes and the emergent modern movements on the continent. Though ultimately a spectacular failure, the New Party burned brightly if briefly. It helped pave the way for a wider debate on the possibilities of economic planning; it simultaneously led Mosley into the realm of fascism. Throughout this process, Mosley sought counsel from many of the period's most well-known personalities. As Mosley searched to find a solution to Britain's economic ails, he drew inspiration from the likes of George Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells; he looked to secure the backing of Lord Beaverbrook and Lord Rothermere; he endeavoured to strike political deals with Winston Churchill and Lloyd George whilst also hoping to draw on the support of young, radical politicians such as Aneurin Bevan, John Strachey and Bo Boothby. In the event, the New Party's appeal proved ephemeral. Nevertheless, its brief history proved integral to Mosley's adoption of the blackshirt. It was in the New Party that British fascism was formed in embryo; it was in the New Party that Mosley raised the slogan of a corporate state and struggled to conceive a new form of politics that transcended the perceived limits of parliamentary democracy.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Introduction Failures: The New Party in Historyp. 1
Here are the Young Men: The New Party in Contextp. 14
From Reform to Revolution: New Party Policyp. 33
Visions of the Near Future: New Party Ideologyp. 50
A Party of a New Type? New Party Organisationp. 67
London Calling: Journeys Through and Around the New Partyp. 84
Going Into Battle: The New Party and Public Politicsp. 107
Outside the Gate: Alternative Routes to Powerp. 125
Leaders of Men: Masculinity and the Promise of a New Lifep. 141
Hurrah for the Greyshirts: The New Party and Fascismp. 152
Conclusion A Life of Contradiction: Mosley and the New Partyp. 164
Notesp. 171
Bibliographyp. 211
Indexp. 228
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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