Catalogue

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Territory and electoral rules in post-communist democracies /
Daniel Bochsler.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xiv, 215 p.
ISBN
0230248276 (hardback), 9780230248274 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230248276 (hardback)
9780230248274 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction: Electoral systems and party systems in the new European democracies -- The puzzle of electoral systems impact in post-communist democracies -- How to measure party nationalisation -- Explaining the nationalisation of party systems in Central and Eastern Europe -- How party systems develop in mixed electoral systems -- Counting votes and places: The joint effect of electoral rules and territory -- Conclusion: An institutional model to predict the number of parties in Central and Eastern Europe .
abstract
"The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalisation) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalisation as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and shows how party nationalisation can increase our understanding of electoral systems"--
catalogue key
7235137
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel Bochsler is Research Fellow at the Central European University, Hungary. He studies comparative politics, with a particular emphasis on the nationalization of party systems and electoral systems. His work has been published in Electoral Studies, Europe-Asia Studies, Public Choice and Regional and federal Studies.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalisation) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalisation as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and shows how party nationalisation can increase our understanding of electoral systems.
Description for Bookstore
Looks at why electoral systems in post-communist democracies have led to unexpected outcomes, and at the importance of territory
Long Description
Electoral systems are the central pillar of every constitutional design. To understand their affect on party systems, we need to consider the issue of territory. Electoral system studies have attempted to explain the format of party systems in post-communist democracies. Usually, proportional representation allows for large multi-party systems and single-seat district elections leading to two-party governments, yet studies on post-communist Europe seem to reveal something different. Are post-communist democracies so chaotic that they surpass the limits of the electoral system school? This study considers the importance of territory: it matters not only how many votes parties get, but also where they get them. The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalization) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalization as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and, by extending common models of electoral systems, it shows how party nationalization can increase our understanding of electoral systems.
Long Description
Electoral systems are the central pillar of every constitutional design. To understand their effect on party systems, we need to consider the issue of territory. Electoral system studies have attempted to explain the format of party systems in post-communist democracies. Usually, proportional representation allows for large multi-party systems and single-seat district elections leading to two-party competition, yet studies on post-communist Europe seem to reveal something different. Are post-communist democracies so chaotic that they surpass the limits of the electoral system school? This study considers the importance of territory: it matters not only how many votes parties get, but also where they get them. The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalization) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalization as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and, by extending common models of electoral systems, it shows how party nationalization can increase our understanding of electoral systems.
Main Description
Electoral systems are the central pillar of every constitutional design. To understand their effect on party systems, we need to consider the issue of territory.
Main Description
The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalisation) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalisation as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and shows how party nationalisation can increase our understanding of electoral systems.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
List of Tablesp. x
Notation of Variablesp. xii
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction: Electoral Systems and Party Systems in the New European Democraciesp. 1
Previous researchp. 2
Relevance and innovations of this studyp. 6
A short guide through this bookp. 11
Conclusionsp. 13
The Puzzle of Electoral Systems' Impact in Post-Communist Democraciesp. 15
Introductionp. 15
Electoral systems and party systems - the conventional viewp. 17
The empirical puzzle: And it all looks like nonsense...p. 30
Conclusions: Do electoral systems not work in post-communist countries?p. 36
How to Measure Party Nationalisationp. 37
Introduction: The relevance of party nationalisation and the lack of a reliable measurep. 37
Previous measures of party nationalisationp. 39
The Gini coefficient to measure regional heterogeneityp. 45
Developments on the party nationalisation score: The impact of the size of territorial unitsp. 47
Testing the 'standardised party nationalisation score' on Central and Eastern European datap. 52
Conclusionsp. 56
Explaining the Nationalisation of Party Systems in Central and Eastern Europep. 58
Introduction: Why study party nationalisation?p. 58
Four explanations for party nationalisationp. 60
Operationalisationp. 65
Party nationalisation in Central and Eastern Europep. 67
Conclusions: Determinants of party nationalisationp. 83
How Party Systems Develop in Mixed Electoral Systemsp. 86
Introductionp. 86
Mixed electoral systems: Terminology and applicationp. 89
How much compensation in mixed compensatory electoral systems?p. 93
Economics of votes: The run for better conversion ratesp. 96
Party system stability and party system changep. 102
The consequences of mixed electoral systems - empirical studyp. 108
Identifying party system equilibriap. 117
How to transform a compensatory into a non-compensatory systemp. 123
The best of both worlds? Preliminary conclusions and suggestions for further researchp. 129
Counting Votes and Places: The Joint Effect of Electoral Rules and Territoryp. 132
Introductionp. 132
About methodology: Going beyond directional models in political sciencep. 134
How to resolve the Central and Eastern European electoral system puzzle?p. 135
A model of district magnitude, number of districts and party nationalisationp. 140
The importance of national electoral thresholdsp. 144
Umbrellas and rainbows - the early development of the new party systemsp. 147
Testing the full party nationalisation modelp. 149
A comprehensive model for the fragmentation of party systemsp. 156
Conclusionsp. 161
Conclusions: An Institutional Model to Predict the Number of Parties in Central and Eastern Europep. 163
A two-step model to investigate the effect of party nationalisation and electoral systemsp. 164
Territorial ethnic divides, super-presidencies and party nationalisationp. 165
The joint impact of party nationalisation and district magnitudep. 166
A comprehensive model for the fragmentation of party systemsp. 168
Mixed electoral systems - the surprise packet among the electoral systemsp. 168
Institutions workp. 169
Relation to previous studies of electoral systemsp. 170
Party nationalisation and the size of party systems in different contextsp. 171
Appendicesp. 174
p. 174
p. 175
p. 176
Notesp. 177
Bibliographyp. 197
Indexp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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