Catalogue


Saints' lives and the rhetoric of gender [electronic resource] : male and female in Merovingian hagiography /
John Kitchen.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
description
xv, 255 p.
ISBN
0195117220 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
isbn
0195117220 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7228852
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-250) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-03-01:
Recent scholarship has argued that the study of the lives of female medieval saints reveals a distinct form of female sanctity that only female hagiography has been able to articulate. John Kitchen (currently Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics and History at the Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton) challenges this view, at least as it applies to sixth-century France, by placing female hagiographic writings in the context of the hagiographic tradition as a whole. He examines in detail male writings about male saints, then male writing about female saints, and finally an especially notable biography of a female saint written by a woman. What Kitchen discovers is a far more complex picture of similarities and differences between the sanctity of male and female saints than is revealed by methodologies with a narrower focus. This is an important although controversial work for feminist as well as medieval studies. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and researchers. P. L. Urban Jr.; emeritus, Swarthmore College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[An] important book [for] anyone interested in Christian attitudes toward women."--First Things
"[An] important book [for] anyone interested in Christian attitudes towardwomen."--First Things
"His book is a valuable addition to any study of female gender in hagiography and should lead people to turn to a renewed interest in the life of St. Radegund."--Koinonia, The Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Forum
"His book is a valuable addition to any study of female gender inhagiography and should lead people to turn to a renewed interest in the life ofSt. Radegund."--Koinonia, The Princeton Theological Seminary GraduateForum
"John Kitchen's study is an important contribution."--Catholic Historical Review
"John Kitchen's study is an important contribution."--Catholic HistoricalReview
"John Kitchen's study is an important contribution to the ongoing revival of [Gregory's and Fortunatas's] reputations as hagiographers....Its obvious strengths are its meticulous comparison of various Lives and its insistence upon including texts that are not explicitly about women in astudy of female views of holiness."--The Catholic Historical Review
"John Kitchen's study is an important contribution to the ongoing revivalof [Gregory's and Fortunatas's] reputations as hagiographers....Its obviousstrengths are its meticulous comparison of various Lives and its insistence uponincluding texts that are not explicitly about women in a study of female viewsof holiness."--The Catholic Historical Review
"This is an important although controversial work for feminist as well as medieval studies. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and researchers."--Choice
"This is an important although controversial work for feminist as well asmedieval studies. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduatestudents, faculty and researchers."--Choice
"This is an important although controversial work for feminist as well as medieval studies. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and researchers."--Choice "[An] important book [for] anyone interested in Christian attitudes toward women."--First Things "His book is a valuable addition to any study of female gender in hagiography and should lead people to turn to a renewed interest in the life of St. Radegund."--Koinonia, The Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Forum
"This is an important although controversial work for feminist as well as medieval studies. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and researchers."-- Choice "[An] important book [for] anyone interested in Christian attitudes toward women."-- First Things "His book is a valuable addition to any study of female gender in hagiography and should lead people to turn to a renewed interest in the life of St. Radegund."-- Koinonia , The Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Forum
"John Kitchen's study is an important contribution to the ongoing revival of [Gregory's and Fortunatas's] reputations as hagiographers....Its obvious strengths are its meticulous comparison of various Lives and its insistence upon including texts that are not explicitly about women in a study of female views of holiness."--The Catholic Historical Review"This is an important although controversial work for feminist as well as medieval studies. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and researchers."--Choice"[An] important book [for] anyone interested in Christian attitudes toward women."--First Things"His book is a valuable addition to any study of female gender in hagiography and should lead people to turn to a renewed interest in the life of St. Radegund."--Koinonia, The Princeton Theological Seminary Graduate Forum"John Kitchen's study is an important contribution."--Catholic Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Medieval lives of female saints have attracted wide attention in recent years. In this revisionist work, John Kitchen looks at several texts-lives of both male and female saints.
Long Description
Medieval lives of female saints have attracted wide attention in recent years. Some scholars have argued that such texts reveal a distinctive form of female sanctity which only female hagiographers managed properly to articulate, and important writings have been attributed to female authors on that assumption. In this revisionist work, John Kitchen tests such claims through a close examination of several texts--lives of both male and female saints, by authors of both sexes--from sixth century France. He argues that sometimes the "authentic voice" of the female writer or saint sounds emphatically male. This study gives examples of how both male and female authors sometimes depicted holy women talking, acting, or even dressing like their male counterparts. Ultimately, the author aims to cast doubt on the assumption that male authors were ignorant of or hostile toward certain--specifically female--concerns. By the same token, Kitchen's work raises serious methodological problems with the gender approach to the hagiographic literature of the early Middle Ages.
Main Description
Medieval lives of female saints have attracted wide attention in recentyears. Some feminist scholars have argued that such texts reveal a distinctiveform of female sanctity which only female hagiographers managed to properlyarticulate, and numerous texts have been attributed to female authors on thatassumption. In this revisionist work, John Kitchen tests such claims through aclose examination of several texts--lives of both male and female saints, byauthors of both sexes--from sixth century France. Through these studies, theauthor aims to cast doubt on the assumption that male authors were ignorant ofor hostile to certain--specifically female--concerns. By the same token,Kitchen's work raises serious methodological problems with the assignation ofcertain texts to female authors on the basis of content and style.
Main Description
Medieval lives of female saints have attracted wide attention in recent years. Some scholars have argued that such texts reveal a distinctive form of female sanctity which only female hagiographers managed to properly articulate, and important writings have been attributed to female authors onthat assumption. In this revisionist work, John Kitchen tests such claims through a close examination of several texts--lives of both male and female saints, by authors of both sexes--from sixth century France. He argues that sometimes the "authentic voice" of the female writer or saint soundsemphatically male. This study gives examples of how both male and female authors sometimes depicted holy women talking, acting, or even dressing like their male counterparts. Ultimately, the author aims to cast doubt on the assumption that male authors were ignorant of or hostile towardcertain--specifically female--concerns. By the same token, Kitchen's work raises serious methodological problems with the gender approach to the hagiographic literature of the early Middle Ages.
Main Description
Medieval lives of female saints have attracted wide attention in recent years. Some scholars have argued that such texts reveal a distinctive form of female sanctity which only female hagiographers managed to properly articulate, and important writings have been attributed to female authors on that assumption. In this revisionist work, John Kitchen tests such claims through a close examination of several texts--lives of both male and female saints, by authors of both sexes--from sixth century France. He argues that sometimes the "authentic voice" of the female writer or saint sounds emphatically male. This study gives examples of how both male and female authors sometimes depicted holy women talking, acting, or even dressing like their male counterparts. Ultimately, the author aims to cast doubt on the assumption that male authors were ignorant of or hostile toward certain--specifically female--concerns. By the same token, Kitchen's work raises serious methodological problems with the gender approach to the hagiographic literature of the early Middle Ages.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Author's Notep. xv
Introduction: Methods and Metaphorsp. 3
Sanctip. 23
The Prose Hagiography Of Venantius Fortunatusp. 25
Gregory Of Tours's Life Of The Fathersp. 58
Sanctaep. 99
""""Like A Man Among Men"""" The Female Saint in a Male Corpusp. 101
Baudonivia's Life Of Saint Radegundp. 134
Conclusion: A World Turned Upside-Downp. 154
Appendix: Tabular Comparison of Miracle Stories in the Lives of Radegundp. 161
Notesp. 167
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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