Catalogue


The patriot opposition to Walpole : politics, poetry, and national myth, 1725-1742 /
Christine Gerrard.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1994.
description
xiv, 273 p. : ill.
ISBN
0198129823 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon Press, 1994.
isbn
0198129823 :
catalogue key
717397
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-07:
This spirited study is a much needed complement to Mack, Goldgar, and others on anti-Walpolian satire and to recent work on Jacobite rhetoric. Gerrard ranges widely and argues incisively about Whig or patriot opposition ideology and literary expression of the 1730s and 1740s. Like the best new historical literary scholarship, the book not only recontextualizes well-known writers (Pope, Bolingbroke, Thomson, Lyttelton, Somervile, Savage, Johnson et al.) but considers afresh many neglected figures. Gerrard has done her homework in archival reading very convincingly. Somewhat less satisfying is the book's tendency to treat literary texts as transparent; long passages of poetry are quoted but not "read," except for brief comments on their ideological and political content. This method yields a clear, swift-moving, occasionally witty argument but little room for pondering any questions of literary form or textuality. Similarly disappointing are the complete lack of engagement with questions of gender and the author's persistent relegation of women's writing to the margins. Delarivier Manley, Eliza Haywood, and Jane Brereton, to name only a few, are quoted or mentioned, sometimes with tantalizing suggestions of their literary innovations, but nothing is made of them, and Brereton is dismissively referred to as a "poetess." What can it mean when such well-intentioned new historical work looks in these respects remarkably like the old? Upper-division undergraduate; graduate; faculty. D. Landry; Wayne State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a significant contribution to the growing corpus of scholarship on the genesis of British nationalism in the 18th century.'Times Higher Education Supplement
"A significant contribution to the growing corpus of scholarship on the genesis of British nationalism in the 18th century."--Times Higher Education Supplement "This spirited study is a much needed complement to Mack, Goldgar, and others on anti-Walpolian satire and to recent work on Jacobite rhetoric....Like the best new historical literary scholarship, the book not only recontextualizes well-known writers..,but considers afresh many neglected figures. Gerrard has done her homework in archival reading very convincingly."--Choice "Thanks to Christine Gerrard, we now have an angle of vision into the imaginative world of the Whigs who opposed Walpole."--Albion
"A significant contribution to the growing corpus of scholarship on the genesis of British nationalism in the 18th century."-- Times Higher Education Supplement "This spirited study is a much needed complement to Mack, Goldgar, and others on anti-Walpolian satire and to recent work on Jacobite rhetoric....Like the best new historical literary scholarship, the book not only recontextualizes well-known writers..,but considers afresh many neglected figures. Gerrard has done her homework in archival reading very convincingly."-- Choice "Thanks to Christine Gerrard, we now have an angle of vision into the imaginative world of the Whigs who opposed Walpole."-- Albion
'Dr Gerrard offers a valuable account of 'different aspects of perhaps the distinctive hallmark of the Patriot literary programme - its imaginative engagement with British myth and legend' ... this is really a work of 'historicist' ... literary criticism, in which Dr Gerrard increases ourunderstanding of the ideological underpinnings of 'Patriot' poetry ... Dr Gerrard has new things to say about poets with whom we thought we were familiar.'J.A. Downie, Goldsmiths College, London, Parliamentary History, 13,3 (1996)
'lively and wide-ranging study of the literary culture of the 'Patriot' opposition to Walpole ... This study surpasses its predecessorts ... in the precision with which it invokes the historical foreground of the period ... Throughout, the reader is shown how events in the domain of politicsdo not determine literary practice, but create realities to which writers respond with varying degrees of wit and imagination.'David Womersley, Jesus College, Oxford, RES New Series, Vol. XLVIII, No. 190 (1997)
'There is much to admire in the careful scholarship and the imaginative appreciation of literature and the arts that she brings to this well-written study.'H.T. Dickinson, University of Edinburgh, EHR Apr. 97
'This helpful volume provides another demonstration of the value of integrating historical and literary studies...Gerrard keeps faith with the complexities, inconsistencies, and ambiguities of humankind and its artifacts.'Albion
'This is the first book-length study of Patriot art and politics, and performs the valuable task of isolating and elaborating upon a distinctive cluster of cultural achievements. The Patriot Opposition to Walpole is particularly conscientious in the way it anticipates artistic developments bypost-Walpolean writers, and thus has important things to say about artistic manoeuvrings in the century as a whole.'Karen O'Brien, Cardiff University, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 19, part 2
'This helpful volume provides another demonstration of the value of integrating historical and literary studies...Gerrard keeps faith with the complexities, inconsistencies, and ambiguities of humankind and its artifacts.'Albion'a significant contribution to the growing corpus of scholarship on the genesis of British nationalism in the 18th century.'Times Higher Education Supplement'This is the first book-length study of Patriot art and politics, and performs the valuable task of isolating and elaborating upon a distinctive cluster of cultural achievements. The Patriot Opposition to Walpole is particularly conscientious in the way it anticipates artistic developments by post-Walpolean writers, and thus has important things to say about artistic manoeuvrings in the century as a whole.'Karen O'Brien, Cardiff University, British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 19, part 2'There is much to admire in the careful scholarship and the imaginative appreciation of literature and the arts that she brings to this well-written study.'H.T. Dickinson, University of Edinburgh, EHR Apr. 97'Dr Gerrard offers a valuable account of 'different aspects of perhaps the distinctive hallmark of the Patriot literary programme - its imaginative engagement with British myth and legend' ... this is really a work of 'historicist' ... literary criticism, in which Dr Gerrard increases our understanding of the ideological underpinnings of 'Patriot' poetry ... Dr Gerrard has new things to say about poets with whom we thought we were familiar.'J.A. Downie, Goldsmiths College, London, Parliamentary History, 13,3 (1996)'lively and wide-ranging study of the literary culture of the 'Patriot' opposition to Walpole ... This study surpasses its predecessorts ... in the precision with which it invokes the historical foreground of the period ... Throughout, the reader is shown how events in the domain of politics do not determine literary practice, but create realities to which writers respond with varying degrees of wit and imagination.'David Womersley, Jesus College, Oxford, RES New Series, Vol. XLVIII, No. 190 (1997)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 1995
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Summaries
Long Description
What did it mean to be a "Patriot" during the Walpole administration? This is the first full-length study of the so-called Patriot opposition to Walpole which reached its height during the clamor for war against Spain at the turn of the 1730s. Christine Gerrard examines the interrelationship between patriotism, politics, and poetry in the period 1724-1742, looking at the poetry and drama of such authors as James Thomson, Alexander Pope, and the young Samuel Johnson, who were all drawn to the heady idealism of the young Boy Patriots. Other authors discussed include Bolingbroke, Lyttleton, West, Mallet, and Hill, and Gerrard looks, too, at the literature, prints, architecture, and statuary of the 1730s.
Long Description
What did it mean to be a 'Patriot' during the Walpole administration? This is the first full-length study of the so-called Patriot opposition to Walpole which reached its height during the clamour for war against Spain at the turn of the 1730s. The book examines the interrelationship between patriotism, politics, and poetry in the period 1724-1742. Christine Gerrard investigates the growing Patriot opposition during the Walpolian oligarchy, and asks whether a broad credo united all of Walpole's political opponents, or whether there was a distinction between Whig and Tory Patriots. The role of Frederick Prince of Wales as the campaign's cultural and political figurehead (Bolingbroke's visionary 'Patriot King') is discussed, as are the poetry and drama of such authors as James Thomson, Alexander Pope, and the young Samuel Johnson, who were all drawn to the heady idealism of the young Boy Patriots. Thomson's Rule Britannia and Johnson's London exploit the appeal to British history so central to the emotive propaganda of the Patriot campaign. Drawing on the literature, prints, architecture, and statuary of the 1730s, Christine Gerrard also discusses two of the decade's most powerful romantic patriotic myths - Gothic liberty, and Elizabethan greatness - and reveals that in its nationalistic emphasis upon Nordic and Celtic traditions, the figure of the ancient British Druid, and native 'bards', Patriot literature anticipates the 'Gothic' strain emerging in the poetry of Gray, Collins, and the Wartons only a few years later.
Main Description
This first full-length study of the so-called Patriot opposition to Walpole, explores the interrelationship between patriotism, politics, and poetry between 1725 and 1742. Discusses Pope, Bolingbroke, Johnson, Thomson, Lyttleton, West, Mallet, and Hill, as well as the literature, prints, architecture, and statuary of the 1730s.
Main Description
What did it mean to be a 'Patriot' during the Walpole administration? This is the first full-length study of the so-called Patriot opposition to Walpole which reached its height during the clamour for war against Spain at the turn of the 1730s. The book examines the interrelationship betweenpatriotism, politics, and poetry in the period 1724-1742. Christine Gerrard investigates the growing Patriot opposition during the Walpolian oligarchy, and asks whether a broad credo united all of Walpole's political opponents, or whether there was a distinction between Whig and Tory Patriots. The role of Frederick Prince of Wales as the campaign'scultural and political figurehead (Bolingbroke's visionary 'Patriot King') is discussed, as are the poetry and drama of such authors as James Thomson, Alexander Pope, and the young Samuel Johnson, who were all drawn to the heady idealism of the young Boy Patriots. Thomson's Rule Britannia andJohnson's London exploit the appeal to British history so central to the emotive propaganda of the Patriot campaign. Drawing on the literature, prints, architecture, and statuary of the 1730s, Christine Gerrard also discusses two of the decade's most powerful romantic patriotic myths - Gothic liberty, and Elizabethan greatness - and reveals that in its nationalistic emphasis upon Nordic and Celtic traditions, thefigure of the ancient British Druid, and native 'bards', Patriot literature anticipates the 'Gothic' strain emerging in the poetry of Gray, Collins, and the Wartons only a few years later.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Abbreviations
Politicians, Poets, and the Prince
Patriots and Patriotismp. 3
Whigs in Oppositionp. 19
Cultural Patriotism: Frederick and the Artsp. 46
Pope, Politics, and Genrep. 68
Mythologizing History
Patriot Gothicp. 108
Political Elizabethanism and the Spenser Revivalp. 150
Mythologizing the Monarch: Ideas of a Patriot Kingp. 185
Jacobites and Patriots: Johnson and Savagep. 230
Bibliographyp. 248
Indexp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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