Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Bengal divided : Hindu communalism and partition, 1932-1947 /
Joya Chatterji.
imprint
Cambridge, [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
xvii, 303 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521411289
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521411289
catalogue key
717345
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-11:
Chatterji's well-documented study should become one of the most significant recently published works on Indian history. Chatterji discusses the Bengali elite's shift in focus, in the last 15 years of British rule, from national interests to local, provincial concerns. According to the author, this reorientation of bhadralok concerns was stimulated by enlargement of the franchise, reservation of seats for depressed castes, and a consequent fear on the part of Bengali Hindus that they were about to lose their accustomed position of dominance in Bengali politics. Fearing eventual Muslim control of the Bengal body politic, Bengali Hindus developed a communal perspective and began to campaign for partition of the province. The Bengali Hindu position meshed after WW II with developing perceptions among leaders of the National Congress Party of India. Consequently, Chatterji argues that in Bengal, Hindus evolved a parallel separation movement to that of the Muslim League and that the call for partition of the subcontinent was not solely a Muslim phenomenon. This thoughtful and original interpretation should be in all libraries supporting South Asia studies. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. L. White; Appalachian State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Bengal Divided relates how a large and powerful section of Hindu society in Bengal insisted that their province be divided to create a separate Hindu homeland. The picture which emerges is one of a fragmented society moving away from the mainstream of Indian nationalism, and increasingly preoccupied with more parochial concerns.
Description for Library
In an original and compelling account of the political and social processes that led to the demand for partition in Bengal, the author traces the rise of Hindu communalism and shows how a large and powerful section of Hindu society in Bengal insisted that their province be divided so as to create a separate Hindu homeland. The picture which emerges is one of a stratified and fragmented society moving away from the mainstream of Indian nationalism, and increasingly preoccupied with narrower and more parochial concerns.
Main Description
Whereas previous studies of the end of British rule in India have concentrated on the negotiations of the transfer of power at the all-India level or have considered the emergence of separatist politics amongst India's Muslim minorities, this study provides a re-evaluation of the history of Bengal focusing on the political and social processes that led to the demand for partition in Bengal and tracing the rise of Hindu communalism. In its most startling revelation, the author shows how the demand for a separate homeland for the Hindus, which was fuelled by a large and powerful section of Hindu society within Bengal, was seen as the only way to regain influence and to wrest power from the Muslim majority. The picture which emerges is one of a stratified and fragmented society moving away from the mainstream of Indian nationalism, and increasingly preoccupied with narrower, more parochial concerns.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Bengal politics and the Communal Award
The emergence of the mofussil in Bengal politics
The reorientation of the Bengal Congress, 1937-45
The construction of Bhadralok communal 'identity': culture and communalism in Bengal
Hindu unity and Muslim tyranny: aspects of Hindu Bhadralok politics, 1936-47
The second partition of Bengal, 1945-47
Conclusion
Appendix
Bibliography.
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem