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The having of Negroes is become a burden : the Quaker struggle to free slaves in revolutionary North Carolina /
[edited by] Michael J. Crawford.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2010.
description
xvii, 237 p.
ISBN
0813034701 (alk. paper), 9780813034706 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2010.
isbn
0813034701 (alk. paper)
9780813034706 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
7171461
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-03-01:
Between 1777 and 1800, North Carolina Quakers struggled to liberate their slaves. As a group, Friends had concluded that slavery was wrong, and members were given a choice of freeing their slaves or losing their membership. The state of North Carolina, however, actively discouraged manumission, requiring proof of "meritorious service," the approval of a county court, and, later, posting of a substantial bond. Moreover, perceiving both Quakers and slaves as pro-British, North Carolina authorities viewed freed slaves as a Tory Fifth Column. Thus, the dozens of slaves North Carolina Friends emancipated found themselves seized and reenslaved. Much of this story is familiar to students of Quaker history. Crawford's contribution is to make use of hitherto unknown diaries and letters of George Walton (died 1789), a Quaker convert whose accounts of dreams and conversations with fellow Quakers provide an almost unique resource. Crawford (Naval History and Heritage Command) supplements the Walton material with extensive extracts from Quaker records, court documents, and legislative proceedings. They drive home how difficult, even in an era of revolution, opposing slavery was in North Carolina. Summing Up: Recommended. Faculty. T. D. Hamm Earlham College
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2011
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"Adds an important sharpness to a cloudily understood aspect of American history. Crawford helps bring Quaker history into the mainstream of a larger context, providing a compelling narrative of a region, a community, and a fascinating individual."--Emma J. Lapansky-Werner, Haverford College "A thorough and often extraordinarily eloquent collection of documents from the struggle over emancipation and African-American freedom in the age of revolution."--Jon F. Sensbach, author of Rebecca's Revival Michael Crawford presents the compelling story of colonial manumission movements among North Carolina Quakers in this illuminating volume. Embedding complete primary documents within the context of his own interpretive analysis, Crawford effectively shows how the consequences of this group's antislavery activism radiated out from a few individuals to the region, the state, and, eventually, the nation. Students and scholars will be able to draw their own insights from the important documents presented in The Having of Negroes Is Become a Burden, many of them obscure or recently discovered. Through diaries, petitions, legislative debates, and letters, well-known as well as unknown players in the struggle for manumission are allowed to tell their own stories in their own words. This approach has the effect of highlighting the personal motivation of figures both prominent and obscure in the movement.
Description for Bookstore
"Adds an important sharpness to a cloudily understood aspect of American history. Crawford helps bring Quaker history into the mainstream of a larger context, providing a compelling narrative of a region, a community, and a fascinating individual."--Emma J. Lapansky-Werner, Haverford College "A thorough and often extraordinarily eloquent collection of documents from the struggle over emancipation and African-American freedom in the age of revolution."--Jon F. Sensbach, author ofRebecca's Revival Michael Crawford presents the compelling story of colonial manumission movements among North Carolina Quakers in this illuminating volume. Embedding complete primary documents within the context of his own interpretive analysis, Crawford effectively shows how the consequences of this group's antislavery activism radiated out from a few individuals to the region, the state, and, eventually, the nation. Students and scholars will be able to draw their own insights from the important documents presented inThe Having of Negroes Is Become a Burden, many of them obscure or recently discovered. Through diaries, petitions, legislative debates, and letters, well-known as well as unknown players in the struggle for manumission are allowed to tell their own stories in their own words. This approach has the effect of highlighting the personal motivation of figures both prominent and obscure in the movement.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Chronology of Principal Eventsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
An Individual: George Walton Confronts Slaveryp. 27
1772-1773: George Walton's Accounts of Two Dreamsp. 29
1774: George Walton's Letters on Slavery, with an Account of a Dreamp. 37
1775-1777: George Walton's Journal from 2d, 6th Month, 1775, to 12th, 10th Month, 1777p. 49
The Community: The Society of Friends in North Carolina Chooses Manumissionp. 69
1767: Thomas Nicholson Urges Gradual Emancipationp. 73
1768-1773: Evolution of the North Carolina Yearly Meeting's Policy on Slave Tradingp. 76
1772-1773: Advice from Londonp. 80
1774-1775: Evolution of the North Carolina Yearly Meeting's Policy on Slave Ownershipp. 82
Circa 1775: Thomas Nicholson Urges Immediate Emancipationp. 84
1776: Thomas Newby's Manumission Paperp. 87
1777: Thomas Newby's Petition to Free His Slave Hannahp. 89
1776-1789: The Progress of Manumissionp. 916
1777-1797: List of Emancipated Blacks Who Were Re-Enslavedp. 100
The State: North Carolina Thwarts Quaker Manumissionp. 107
1777: An Act to Prevent Domestic Insurrectionsp. 111
1777: The Trial of Several Negroes Manumitted by Friendsp. 113
1777-1778: Accounts of Sales of Blacks Emancipated by Friendsp. 117
1777: Friends' Reasons for Releasing Their Negroes from a State of Slaveryp. 120
1778: The Superior Court Annuls Re-Enslavementsp. 122
1779: New State Legislation Annuls the Superior Court's Judgmentp. 126
1779: Memorial from Friends Who Manumitted Slaves to the North Carolina General Assemblyp. 128
1779: Thomas Nicholson Upbraids an Informerp. 131
1788: Memorial from the North Carolina Yearly Meeting to the North Carolina General Assemblyp. 133
1788: An Act to Amend an Act Entitled "An Act to Prevent Domestic Insurrections"p. 135
1797: A Bill to Thwart Quaker Manumissionsp. 137
The Nation: African-American Freedom and the Manumission Debate in Congressp. 139
1797: Petition of Freemenp. 143
1797: Congress Debates the Freemen's Petitionp. 149
1797: Pennsylvania Friends'Yearly Meeting Memorial to the Congress of the United Statesp. 158
1797-1798: Congress Debates the Pennsylvania Friends'Memorialp. 162
1798: The Society of Friends Reacts to the House's Rejection of Its Memorialp. 182
Epiloguep. 183
Notesp. 193
Bibliography of Works Citedp. 213
Indexp. 221
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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