Catalogue


Forties film funnymen : the decade's great comedians at work in the shadow of war /
Wes D. Gehring ; foreword by Anthony Slide.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2010.
description
vii, 226 p.
ISBN
0786442573 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786442577 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2010.
isbn
0786442573 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786442577 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Charlie Chaplin: The great dictator (1940) -- W. C. Fields: The bank dick (1940) -- Abbott & Costello: Buck privates (1941) -- Jack Benny: To be or not to be (1942) -- Eddie Bracken: The miracle of Morgan's Creek (1944) -- Bob Hope & Bing Crosby: Road to utopia (1946) -- Danny Kaye: The kid from Brooklyn (1946) -- The Marx Brothers: A night in Casablanca (1946) -- Harold Lloyd: The sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947) (a.k.a. Mad Wednesday) -- Bob Hope: My favorite brunette (1947) -- Charlie Chaplin: Monsieur Verdoux (1947) -- Red Skelton: A southern Yankee (1948) -- Epilogue.
abstract
"The twelve comedy films examined are distinguished by an equal number of defining comic performances. Each film focuses on the central theme of "clown comedy": Resilience, the encouragement or hope that one can survive the most daunting of life's dilemmas. Each film can be regarded as a microcosm of the antiheroic world of its central clown (or clowns)"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7171380
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Wes D. Gehring is a professor of film at Ball State University and associate media editor for USA Today magazine, for which he also writes the column "Reel World." He is the author of 30 film related books.
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"The twelve comedy films examined are distinguished by an equal number of defining comic performances. Each film focuses on the central theme of "clown comedy": Resilience, the encouragement or hope that one can survive the most daunting of life's dilemmas. Each film can be regarded as a microcosm of the antiheroic world of its central clown (or clowns)"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
The twelve classic comedies of this book have an equal number of defining comic performances. Ranging from The Great Dictator (1940) to A Southern Yankee (1948), each film exemplifies the central theme of "clown comedy": Resilience. But the dark modern world had finally come to mainstream comic cinema-many of the funny "miracle" conclusions suggest that a happy ending was now strictly a long shot.
Main Description
The twelve classic comedy films examined within these pages are distinguished by an equal number of defining comic performances. Ranging from The Great Dictator (1940) to A Southern Yankee (1948), each film focuses on the most central theme of "clown comedy": Resilience, the encouragement or hope that one can survive the most daunting of life's dilemmas--even during the war-torn 1940s. And each film can be regarded as a microcosm of the antiheroic world of its central clown (or clowns).Among the performers represented are Charlie Chaplin, W.C. Fields, Abbott and Costello, Jack Benny, Eddie Bracken, Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, the Marx Brothers, Harold Lloyd and Red Skelton. This lavishly illustrated work includes an introduction by noted film critic and historian Anthony Slide.
Main Description
The twelve classic comedy films examined within these pages are distinguished by an equal number of defining comic performances. Ranging from The Great Dictator (1940) to A Southern Yankee (1948), each film focuses on the most central theme of clown comedy: Resilience, the encouragement or hope that one can survive the most daunting of life's dilemmas--even during the war-torn 1940s. And each film can be regarded as a microcosm of the antiheroic world of its central clown (or clowns). Among the performers represented are Charlie Chaplin, W.C. Fields, Abbott and Costello, Jack Benny, Eddie Bracken, Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, the Marx Brothers, Harold Lloyd and Red Skelton. This lavishly illustrated work includes an introduction by noted film critic and historian Anthony Slide.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The twelve comedy films examined are distinguished by an equal number of defining comic performances. Each film focuses on the central theme of 'clown comedy' - resilience, the encouragement or hope that one can survive the most daunting of life's dilemmas.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. 1
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. 5
Introductionp. 9
Charlie Chaplin: The Great Dictator (1940)p. 13
W. C. Fields: The Bank Dick (1940)p. 30
Abbott & Costello: Buck Privates (1941)p. 46
Jack Benny: To Be or Not to Be (1942)p. 59
Eddie Bracken: The Miracle of Morgan's Creek (1944)p. 75
Bob Hope & Bing Crosby: The Road to Utopia (1946)p. 89
Danny Kaye: The Kid from Brooklyn (1946)p. 102
The Marx Brothers: A Night in Casablanca (1946)p. 115
Harold Lloyd: The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947) (a. k. a. Mad Wednesday)p. 133
Bob Hope: My Favorite Brunette (1947)p. 150
Charlie Chaplin: Monsieur Verdoux (1947)p. 165
Red Skelton: A Southern Yankee (1948)p. 179
Epiloguep. 192
Filmographyp. 99
Chapter Notesp. 201
Bibliographyp. 213
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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