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The road from authoritarianism to democratization in Indonesia /
Paul J. Carnegie.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xx, 171 p.
ISBN
0230102425 (alk. paper), 9780230102422 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230102425 (alk. paper)
9780230102422 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
7171318
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Paul J. Carnegie is Lecturer in Political Science at the British University in Egypt. His research focus is on issues in democratization, specifically, how we go about interpreting the role both political action and institutions play in post-authoritarian settings and the relationship between material and ideational factors associated with democracy. He previously spent seven years in Australia and the Asia Pacific region.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-01-01:
The last half of this book provides a useful summary of Indonesia's rather remarkable transition from the paternalistic authoritarianism of Suharto's New Order to today's flawed, but stable, democracy. Those familiar with the growing literature on Indonesia will find nothing novel in Carnegie's narrative or framework. His introductory chapters, devoted to theories of democratization, have the excitement of a doctoral dissertation's requisite survey of the literature and, rather predictably, conclude that a variety of approaches is needed. What Carnegie (British Univ., Egypt) does well is to raise the question of how Indonesia's transition to democracy took place with virtually no change in the power structure, or "how and why political elites were able to manage the transition on their own terms." The absence of a strong civic culture, in which virtually all secular groups except those controlled by the state were banned and Islamic organizations were permitted yet co-opted, left a void that still resonates. It is a story well told. What Carnegie passes over almost entirely, however, is Suharto's purging of the Left, the legacy of which is a party system devoid of substantive conflict or ideology. Summing Up: Not recommended. E. V. Schneier emeritus, City University of New York City College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Paul Carnegie explores the tension between how we frame democratisation & the conclusions we arrive at, demonstrating how & why interpreting ambiguity matters in the study of Indonesia's post-authoritarian settlement & highlights the need for dialogue with proponents of social conflict theory.
Description for Bookstore
A clear demonstration of how and why interpreting ambiguity matters in the study of Indonesia's post-authoritarian settlement
Main Description
By showing what is out there in the field of study and threading it through the eye of a local context, the following book establishes that a tension exists between how we frame democratisation and the conclusions we arrive at. It demonstrates how and why interpreting ambiguity matters in the study of Indonesia's post-authoritarian settlement and highlights the need for dialogue with proponents of social conflict theory.
Main Description
By showing what is out there in the field of study and threading it through the eye of a local context, the following book establishes that a tension exists between the way we frame democratization and the conclusions we arrive at. It demonstrates how and why interpreting ambiguity matters in the study of Indonesia's post-authoritarian settlement.
Main Description
Drawing on lessons from Indonesia, this book interprets ambiguity in post-authoritarian settlements in an insightful and coherent manner.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
List of Abbreviationsp. xv
Glossaryp. xix
Introductionp. 3
Framework for Interpreting Ambiguity in Democratization
Democratization and Ambiguityp. 11
Democratization and Contextual Narrativesp. 43
Indonesian Democratization
Democratization and Politik Aliranp. 65
Democratization and Islamic Politicsp. 81
Democratization and the Middle Classesp. 93
Democratization and the Party Systemp. 105
The Effect of Decentralization
Democratization and Decentralizationp. 119
Conclusionp. 137
Referencesp. 141
Indexp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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