Catalogue

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The British cotton trade, 1660-1815 /
editor, Beverly Lemire.
imprint
London : Pickering & Chatto, 2010.
description
4 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1851969799 (hbk.), 9781851969791 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
London : Pickering & Chatto, 2010.
isbn
1851969799 (hbk.)
9781851969791 (hbk.)
contents note
v. 1. Part I: Early years of trade and British response to Indian cottons, to the late 1600s -- v. 2. Part II: International trade and the politics of consumption, 1690s-1730 -- v. 3. Part III: Establishing a British cotton trade, c. 1730-1815 -- v. 4. Part III: Establishing a British cotton trade, c. 1730-1815, continued.
catalogue key
7169587
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'outstanding ... this source collection and its commentary will not only inform those new to the field but will also prove invaluable for much more specialized researchers.'
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Cotton was the first industrialized global trade. This four-volume edition charts the rise of British trade in cotton from the days of small-scale trading between the Middle East and India to the domination of British-led industrialized manufacture.
Description for Reader
Social and Economic History, Industrial Revolution and Women's Studies
Main Description
Cotton was the first industrialized global trade. This four-volume reset edition charts the rise of British trade in cotton from the days of small-scale trading between the Middle East and India to the domination of British-led industrialized manufacture. Cotton came to dominate fashion, politics and consumer behaviour. Split into three parts, the first charts the early days of the cotton trade and Europe's - later, Britain's - steps to get involved. Part II explores the process of large-scale trade between Britain and India and the public reaction to this, while Part III covers the period of industrialization, when cotton became a global commodity. With trade comes exchange; the concurrent development and dissemination of technology was an important by-product of the trade in cotton. Documentary sources from letters, pamphlets, broadsides, newspaper extracts and advertisements attest to this, as well as throwing light on some of the more unsettling aspects of an industrialized economy. Child labour was widespread, as was a general exploitation of the poor, who could be made to work in factories in appalling circumstances. Such practices caused a change in the political landscape, as workers' conditions fuelled calls for reform. Ultimately, it is the driving force of consumerism that comes through in this collection. The scale of the effect which the trade and manufacture of cotton goods had on British material culture is hard to over-emphasize. The appetite for Indian cottons affected all social strata, and led to a near instantaneous call for a ban from makers of other cloths, whilst the shift in global trading dynamics after the expansion of domestic manufacture of cotton was an important factor in British dominance during the Industrial Revolution and the success of the British Empire. In this sense, it can truly be said that the cotton trade reshaped British society and the wider world.

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