Catalogue


Mexican women and the other side of immigration : engendering transnational ties /
by Luz María Gordillo.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2010.
description
x, 211 p.
ISBN
0292722036 (cl. : alk. paper), 9780292722033 (cl. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2010.
isbn
0292722036 (cl. : alk. paper)
9780292722033 (cl. : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- La fiesta de los ausentes -- Transnational sexualities -- The politics of movement -- Transnational identities and citizenship.
catalogue key
7167625
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Luz Mara Gordillo is Assistant Professor of Women's Studies at Washington State University Vancouver.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-12-01:
This in-depth, extensively researched monograph focuses on the gendered singularities of the transnational communities created by Mexican immigrants. One such community exists between San Ignacio Cerro Gordo, in the state of Jalisco, and Detroit. Its origins date to 1942, at the onset of the Bracero Program. Constant two-way travel by the Detroit immigrants to their Mexican hometown for economic, family, and religious reasons created the networks that secured the transnational community. The foundation of the social relationships between family and neighbors in this cross-border community is more often than previously thought the responsibility of women. Persistently, women have assumed the leadership of immigrant networks, family unity, cultural continuity, and community cohesiveness. The multiplicity of these roles is intricate and burdensome on women. They often find themselves in the middle of the apparent conflict between Mexican cultural and religious traditions versus the US mores of female autonomy and assertiveness. However, these are only seemingly opposite value systems, for the Mexican communities are still substantially patriarchal. Copious notes with transcripts of interviews, illustrations, photographs, and statistical charts. Suggested especially for immigration scholars, lawyers, and immigrant rights advocates. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. S. Arbelaez University of Nebraska at Omaha
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
Weaving narratives with gendered analysis and historiography of Mexicans in the Midwest, Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigration examines the unique transnational community created between San Ignacio Cerro Gordo, Jalisco, and Detroit, Michigan, in the last three decades of the twentieth century, asserting that both the community of origin and the receiving community are integral to an immigrant's everyday life, though the manifestations of this are rife with contradictions. Exploring the challenges faced by this population since the inception of the Bracero Program in 1942 in constantly re-creating, adapting, accommodating, shaping, and creating new meanings of their environments, Luz María Gordillo emphasizes the gender-specific aspects of these situations. While other studies of Mexican transnational identity focus on social institutions, Gordillo's work introduces the concept of transnational sexualities, particularly the social construction of working-class sexuality. Her findings indicate that many female San Ignacians shattered stereotypes, transgressing traditionally male roles while their husbands lived abroad. When the women themselves immigrated as well, these transgressions facilitated their adaptation in Detroit. Placed within the larger context of globalization, Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigration is a timely excavation of oral histories, archival documents, and the remnants of three decades of memory.
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of the transnational experiences of Mexicans who immigrated from San Ignacio Gordo, Jalisco, to Detroit, Michigan.
Main Description
Weaving narratives with gendered analysis and historiography of Mexicans in the Midwest,Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigrationexamines the unique transnational community created between San Ignacio Cerro Gordo, Jalisco, and Detroit, Michigan, in the last three decades of the twentieth century, asserting that both the community of origin and the receiving community are integral to an immigrant's everyday life, though the manifestations of this are rife with contradictions. Exploring the challenges faced by this population since the inception of the Bracero Program in 1942 in constantly re-creating, adapting, accommodating, shaping, and creating new meanings of their environments, Luz Mar a Gordillo emphasizes the gender-specific aspects of these situations. While other studies of Mexican transnational identity focus on social institutions, Gordillo's work introduces the concept of transnational sexualities, particularly the social construction of working-class sexuality. Her findings indicate that many female San Ignacians shattered stereotypes, transgressing traditionally male roles while their husbands lived abroad. When the women themselves immigrated as well, these transgressions facilitated their adaptation in Detroit. Placed within the larger context of globalization,Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigrationis a timely excavation of oral histories, archival documents, and the remnants of three decades of memory.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
La Fiesta De Los Ausentesp. 17
Transnational Sexualitiesp. 59
The Politics of Movementp. 93
Transnational Identities and Citizenshipp. 123
Conclusionsp. 150
Notesp. 161
Bibliographyp. 189
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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