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A town in-between : Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and the early Mid-Atlantic interior /
Judith Ridner.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.
description
vi, 287 p.
ISBN
081224236X (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780812242362 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
series title
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.
isbn
081224236X (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780812242362 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Creating a town in-between -- Negotiating the boundaries -- New lines drawn -- War and revolution -- Still in-between -- Adapting to the next century.
catalogue key
7163936
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-02-01:
From its founding in the 1760s until the early 19th century, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, was "in-between." Ridner (Muhlenberg College) argues that the village's location slightly west of the Susquehanna River made it the link between Thomas Penn's desires and the desires of the Indians, then between the frontier and the East, and, finally, as a place for trade, going south to Baltimore, east to Philadelphia, and west to Ohio. Carlisle's economy, resting initially on the fur trade, became a staging area for the British in the French and Indian War; evolved after 1776 as a place to produce war supplies; and ended as an artisan center relying on the grain trade. Scots-Irish dominated the town, with controversies over Native Americans, local authority opposing outsiders, and rich against poor. The people supported the American Revolution, but divided over the Pennsylvania 1776 and federal constitutions. Ridner's thoroughly researched book is most useful for economic history but contains information on many topics: town planning, architecture, roads, Dickinson College, the Whiskey Rebellion. There is little discussion of religion, the family, or culture. Carlisle emerges as a contentious frontier town in which the aspirations of a few to gentility took second place to making money. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. W. Frost emeritus, Swarthmore College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Ridner creates a compelling portrait of the physical space of Carlisle, the economic and political activities of its residents, and the conflicting schemes and hopes of the people outside as well as inside the community. A Town In-Between conveys a rich sense of the texture of life in early America."--Daniel K. Richter, University of Pennsylvania
"Ridner creates a compelling portrait of the physical space of Carlisle, the economic and political activities of its residents, and the conflicting schemes and hopes of the people outside as well as inside the community. A Town In-Between conveys a rich sense of the texture of life in early America."-Daniel K. Richter, University of Pennsylvania
"Ridner creates a compelling portrait of the physical space of Carlisle, the economic and political activities of its residents, and the conflicting schemes and hopes of the people outside as well as inside the community.A Town In-Betweenconveys a rich sense of the texture of life in early America."-Daniel K. Richter, University of Pennsylvania
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In A Town In-Between , Judith Ridner reveals the influential, turbulent past of a modest, quiet American community. Today Carlisle, Pennsylvania, nestled in the Susquehanna Valley, is far from the nation's political and financial centers. In the eighteenth century, however, Carlisle and its residents stood not only at a geographical crossroads but also at the fulcrum of early American controversies. Located between East Coast settlement and the western frontier, Carlisle quickly became a mid-Atlantic hub, serving as a migration gateway to the southern and western interiors, a commercial way station in the colonial fur trade, a military staging and supply ground during the Seven Years' War, American Revolution, and Whiskey Rebellion, and home to one of the first colleges in the United States, Dickinson. A Town In-Between reconsiders the role early American towns and townspeople played in the development of the country's interior. Focusing on the lives of the ambitious group of Scots-Irish colonists who built Carlisle, Judith Ridner reasserts that the early American west was won by traders, merchants, artisans, and laborers--many of them Irish immigrants--and not just farmers. Founded by proprietor Thomas Penn, the rapidly growing town was the site of repeated uprisings, jailbreaks, and one of the most publicized Anti-Federalist riots during constitutional ratification. These conflicts had dramatic consequences for many Scots-Irish Presbyterian residents who found themselves a people in-between, mediating among the competing ethnoreligious, cultural, class, and political interests that separated them from their fellow Quaker and Anglican colonists of the Delaware Valley and their myriad Native American trading partners of the Ohio country. In this thoroughly researched and highly readable study, Ridner argues that interior towns were not so much spearheads of a progressive and westward-moving Euro-American civilization, but volatile places situated in the middle of a culturally diverse, economically dynamic, and politically evolving early America.
Main Description
In A Town In-Between , Judith Ridner reveals the influential, turbulent past of a modest, quiet American community. Today Carlisle, Pennsylvania, nestled in the Susquehanna Valley, is far from the nation's political and financial centers. In the eighteenth century, however, Carlisle and its residents stood not only at a geographical crossroads but also at the fulcrum of early American controversies. Located between East Coast settlement and the western frontier, Carlisle quickly became a mid-Atlantic hub, serving as a migration gateway to the southern and western interiors, a commercial way station in the colonial fur trade, a military staging and supply ground during the Seven Years' War, American Revolution, and Whiskey Rebellion, and home to one of the first colleges in the United States, Dickinson. A Town In-Between reconsiders the role early American towns and townspeople played in the development of the country's interior. Focusing on the lives of the ambitious group of Scots-Irish colonists who built Carlisle, Judith Ridner reasserts that the early American west was won by traders, merchants, artisans, and laborers-many of them Irish immigrants-and not just farmers. Founded by proprietor Thomas Penn, the rapidly growing town was the site of repeated uprisings, jailbreaks, and one of the most publicized Anti-Federalist riots during constitutional ratification. These conflicts had dramatic consequences for many Scots-Irish Presbyterian residents who found themselves a people in-between, mediating among the competing ethnoreligious, cultural, class, and political interests that separated them from their fellow Quaker and Anglican colonists of the Delaware Valley and their myriad Native American trading partners of the Ohio country. In this thoroughly researched and highly readable study, Ridner argues that interior towns were not so much spearheads of a progressive and westward-moving Euro-American civilization, but volatile places situated in the middle of a culturally diverse, economically dynamic, and politically evolving early America.
Main Description
InA Town In-Between, Judith Ridner reveals the influential, turbulent past of a modest, quiet American community. Today Carlisle, Pennsylvania, nestled in the Susquehanna Valley, is far from the nation's political and financial centers. In the eighteenth century, however, Carlisle and its residents stood not only at a geographical crossroads but also at the fulcrum of early American controversies. Located between East Coast settlement and the western frontier, Carlisle quickly became a mid-Atlantic hub, serving as a migration gateway to the southern and western interiors, a commercial way station in the colonial fur trade, a military staging and supply ground during the Seven Years' War, American Revolution, and Whiskey Rebellion, and home to one of the first colleges in the United States, Dickinson. A Town In-Betweenreconsiders the role early American towns and townspeople played in the development of the country's interior. Focusing on the lives of the ambitious group of Scots-Irish colonists who built Carlisle, Judith Ridner reasserts that the early American west was won by traders, merchants, artisans, and laborers-many of them Irish immigrants-and not just farmers. Founded by proprietor Thomas Penn, the rapidly growing town was the site of repeated uprisings, jailbreaks, and one of the most publicized Anti-Federalist riots during constitutional ratification. These conflicts had dramatic consequences for many Scots-Irish Presbyterian residents who found themselves a people in-between, mediating among the competing ethnoreligious, cultural, class, and political interests that separated them from their fellow Quaker and Anglican colonists of the Delaware Valley and their myriad Native American trading partners of the Ohio country. In this thoroughly researched and highly readable study, Ridner argues that interior towns were not so much spearheads of a progressive and westward-moving Euro-American civilization, but volatile places situated in the middle of a culturally diverse, economically dynamic, and politically evolving early America.
Table of Contents
List of Maps and Illustrationsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Creating a Town In-Betweenp. 12
Negotiating the Boundariesp. 44
New Lines Drawnp. 75
War and Revolutionp. 112
Still In-Betweenp. 150
Adapting to the Next Centuryp. 177
List of Abbreviationsp. 209
Notesp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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