Catalogue


Guilt and defense : on the legacies of national socialism in postwar Germany /
Theodor W. Adorno , translated, edited, and with an introduction by Jeffrey K. Olick and Andrew J. Perrin.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2010.
description
xii, 233 p.
ISBN
0674036034 (alk. paper), 9780674036031 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2010.
isbn
0674036034 (alk. paper)
9780674036031 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
7161326
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
I am thrilled that Theodor Adorno's Guilt and Defense: On the Legacies of National Socialism in Postwar Germany has eventually been translated and published in a fine American edition. This book documents Adorno's qualitative interpretations of group discussions that were conducted by the Institute of Social Research in Frankfurt and entailed different strata of German society short after WWII and the Holocaust. Here you can read and learn about what average Germans thought in the late 1940s, and how Adorno reconstructed their ideas. This is the best insight into immediate post-War Germany you will ever get. Anyone interested in post-War German politics and culture needs to take a close look at this. Maybe nothing for the beach, either. But for any intellectual interested in 20th century Germany: Indispensable.
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Summaries
Main Description
Beginning in 1949, Theodor W. Adorno and other members of the reconstituted Frankfurt Institute for Social Research undertook a massive empirical study of German opinions about the legacies of the Nazis, applying and modifying techniques they had learned during their U.S. exile. They published their results in 1955 as a research monograph edited by Friedrich Pollock. The study's qualitative results are published here for the first time in English as Guilt and Defense, a psychoanalytically informed analysis of the rhetorical and conceptual mechanisms with which postwar Germans most often denied responsibility for the Nazi past. In their editorial introduction, Jeffrey K. Olick and Andrew J. Perrin show how Adorno’s famous 1959 essay “The Meaning of Working through the Past,” is comprehensible only as a conclusion to his long-standing research and as a reaction to the debate it stirred; this volume also includes a critique by psychologist Peter R. Hoffstater as well as Adorno’s rejoinder. This previously little-known debate provides important new perspectives on postwar German political culture, on the dynamics of collective memory, and on Adorno’s intellectual legacies, which have contributed more to empirical social research than has been acknowledged. A companion volume, Group Experiment and Other Writings, will present the first book-length English translation of the Frankfurt Group's conceptual, methodological, and theoretical innovations in public opinion research.
Main Description
It remains a pressing question to this day: How did the German people come to terms with the legacies of Nazism? Shortly after World War II, Theodor Adorno and his Frankfurt School colleagues addressed this question in a massive empirical study employing focus groups. The substantive results, originally published as Gruppenexperiment, appear here in its first book-length translation, along with Adorno's accompanying essay on "Guilt and Defense," a psychologically informed analysis of the rhetorical and conceptual mechanisms with which postwar Germans most often denied responsibility for the Nazi past. The volume includes a 1957 critique by the psychologist Peter R. Hoffstater as well as Adorno's rejoinder.The editors' introduction shows how one of Adorno's best-known works, "The Meaning of Working through the Past," becomes comprehensible only as a conclusion to Adorno's long-standing research and the debate it stirred. Understood thus, this hitherto ­little-known debate provides important new perspectives on postwar German political culture, the dynamics of collective memory, and the intellectual legacy of one of the twentieth century's great thinkers.
Main Description
Beginning in 1949, Theodor W. Adorno and other members of the reconstituted Frankfurt Institute for Social Research undertook a massive empirical study of German opinions about the legacies of the Nazis, applying and modifying techniques they had learned during their U.S. exile. They published their results in 1955 as a research monograph edited by Friedrich Pollock. The study's qualitative results are published here for the first time in English as Guilt and Defense , a psychoanalytically informed analysis of the rhetorical and conceptual mechanisms with which postwar Germans most often denied responsibility for the Nazi past. In their editorial introduction, Jeffrey K. Olick and Andrew J. Perrin show how Adorno's famous 1959 essay "The Meaning of Working through the Past," is comprehensible only as a conclusion to his long-standing research and as a reaction to the debate it stirred; this volume also includes a critique by psychologist Peter R. Hoffstater as well as Adorno's rejoinder. This previously little-known debate provides important new perspectives on postwar German political culture, on the dynamics of collective memory, and on Adorno's intellectual legacies, which have contributed more to empirical social research than has been acknowledged. A companion volume, Group Experiment and Other Writings , will present the first book-length English translation of the Frankfurt Group's conceptual, methodological, and theoretical innovations in public opinion research.
Bowker Data Service Summary
It remains a pressing question to this day: How did the German people come to terms with the legacies of Nazism? Shortly after World War II, Theodor Adorno and his Frankfurt School colleagues addressed this question in a massive empirical study employing focus groups. The results appear in this book.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Note on Translationp. xi
The Original Publicationsp. xiii
Introduction
Guilt and Defense: Theodor Adorno and the Legacies of National Socialism in German Societyp. 3
Guilt and Defense
Final Version of the Basic Stimulus (Colburn Letter)p. 45
Prefacep. 48
Guilt and Defensep. 51
Knowledge of the Eventsp. 56
Guiltp. 70
The Self-Image of the Participantsp. 87
The Reality behind Defensiveness: Truth and Ideologyp. 97
Defensep. 114
Elements of National Socialist Ideologyp. 138
The Ambivalent Onesp. 158
Open-minded Participantsp. 169
The Debate with Hofstätter
"On Group Experiment by F. Pollock: A Critical Appraisal"p. 189
"Reply to Peter R. Hofstätter's Critique of Group Experiment"p. 197
Working Through the Past
"The Meaning of Working Through the Past"p. 213
Indexp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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