Catalogue


Girls' secondary education in the Western World : from the 18th to the 20th century /
edited by James C. Albisetti, Joyce Goodman, and Rebecca Rogers.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xii, 223 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0230619460 (hbk.), 9780230619463 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230619460 (hbk.)
9780230619463 (hbk.)
abstract
This collection's focus is on girls' secondary education. The gendered cultural expectations of the middle classes & upper classes will provide the dominant narrative, given the relatively recent democratization of European educational systems.
catalogue key
7158926
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James C. Albisetti is Professor of History at the University of Kentucky. Author of Secondary School Reform in Imperial Germany (1983), Schooling German Girls and Women (1989), and over thirty articles and chapters on German and comparative educational history, he has served as president of the History of Education Society (US) and two terms on the executive committee of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education. He is nearing completion of a new book, Eminent Immigrant Victorians: The Nineteenth Century of Salis and Julie Schwabe. Joyce Goodman is Professor of History of Education and Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Winchester, UK. She is a former editor of History of Education, president of the History of Education Society (UK), and former secretary of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education. She has published widely on women and education and contributed methodological essays on gender history. Her current research focuses on gender, imperialism, internationalism, and education. Goodman is currently editing a multi-volume work with Jane Martin entitled Women and Education. Rebecca Rogers is Professor of the History of Education at Universit Paris Descartes (Paris V) and member of the research laboratory: PUMR 8070 Centre de recherches sur le lien social. A specialist in the history of girls' education in France, she has published widely in both English and French on the subject. She is currently preparing a biography on the woman who founded the first school for Muslim girls in Algiers in 1845.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'...the book indicates a new direction for wedding the history of girlhood and the history of education by continuing inquiry into girls' own learning experiences and perspectives -scholarship that will be supported by the strong foundation provided in this collection.' - Emily Bruce, University of Minnesota, The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth
"Girls are in the news, historically speaking! This excellent anthology on girls' secondary education across Europe brings together a transatlantic cast of contributors. The authors, all pioneering scholars in their fields, address historical developments over 300 years in areas that include most of Europe. Their essays are carefully synchronized, both with respect to earlier historiography and with an eye to the contextual settings religion, nationalism, and colonial expansion in which educators could establish schooling opportunities for girls beyond the primary level. The editors' introductory and concluding essays draw the book together nicely. This collection greatly extends our knowledge and provides a platform for further comparative analysis." --Karen Offen, Historian & Senior Scholar, The Michelle Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford University "Written by leading scholars in their fields, this impressive study of girls' secondary education in Europe has filled a significant gap in the history of education and in women's and gender history. Readers will welcome enthusiastically the up-to-date historiography in each chapter, the succinct but searching analyses of developments, the thematic coherence, the inclusion of colonial developments and transnational networks, and the thoughtful probing of the gender and class, religious and political factors which have helped or impeded progress in the diverse countries of Europe."Ruth Watts, Emeritus Professor of History of Education, University of Birmingham, U.K.
"Girls are in the news, historically speaking! This excellent anthology on girls' secondary education across Europe brings together a transatlantic cast of contributors. The authors, all pioneering scholars in their fields, address historical developments over 300 years in areas that include most of Europe. Their essays are carefully synchronized, both with respect to earlier historiography and with an eye to the contextual settings religion, nationalism, and colonial expansion in which educators could establish schooling opportunities for girls beyond the primary level. The editors' introductory and concluding essays draw the book together nicely. This collection greatly extends our knowledge and provides a platform for further comparative analysis."--Karen Offen, Historian & Senior Scholar, The Michelle Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford University"Written by leading scholars in their fields, this impressive study of girls' secondary education in Europe has filled a significant gap in the history of education and in women's and gender history. Readers will welcome enthusiastically the up-to-date historiography in each chapter, the succinct but searching analyses of developments, the thematic coherence, the inclusion of colonial developments and transnational networks, and the thoughtful probing of the gender and class, religious and political factors which have helped or impeded progress in the diverse countries of Europe."Ruth Watts, Emeritus Professor of History of Education, University of Birmingham, U.K.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In this book, Barry Franklin uses the concept of community as a lens for interpreting urban school reform since 1960. Focusing on the curriculum, he explores the notion of community and then in a series of case studies, applies that concept to reform initiatives in a number of city school systems. Included are such reforms as compensatory education, community control, mayoral takeovers, educational partnerships, and smaller learning communities. This comprehensive work concludes with an epilogue that considers how we can employ the concept of cosmopolitanism to change the idea of community for a 21st century, globalized world and its schools.
Description for Bookstore
The collection's focus on girls' secondary education, and hence the gendered cultural expectations of the middle classes and upper classes, will provide the dominant narrative, given the relatively recent democratization of European educational systems. The wealth of sources concerning secondary education, compared with primary education, in addition to the dearth of comparative analysis, justifies renewed focus on this level of education.
Long Description
This long-awaited synthesis approaches the past three centuries with an eye to highlighting the importance of significant schools, as well as important women educators in the emergence of secondary education for girls. At the same time, each contributor pays careful attention to the specific political, cultural, and socio-economic factors that shaped the emergence of a secondary system open to women. A chronological framework highlights the most important moments of change and attention to how countries exported girls' education to the colonies, as well as the transnational discussion on the subject, makes this volume an exciting addition to scholarship on women's history and the history of education.
Description for Bookstore
This book approaches the past three centuries with an eye to highlighting the importance of significant schools, as well as important women educators in the emergence of secondary education for girls.
Description for Bookstore
The collection's focus on girls' secondary education, and hence the gendered cultural expectations of the middle classes and upper classes, will provide the dominant narrative, given the relatively recent democratisation of European educational systems. The wealth of sources concerning secondary education, compared with primary education, in addition to the dearth of comparative analysis, justifies the focus on this level of education.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This collection's focus is on girls' secondary education. The gendered cultural expectations of the middle classes & upper classes will provide the dominant narrative, given the relatively recent democratization of European educational systems.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Note on Coverp. ix
Series Editors' Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Previous Publicationsp. xv
Girls' Secondary Education in the Western World: A Historical Introductionp. 1
Class and Religion: Great Britain and Irelandp. 9
Culture and Catholicism: Francep. 25
The Influence of Confession and State: Germany and Austriap. 41
Chequered Routes to Secondary Education: Italyp. 59
Between Modernization and Conservatism: Spainp. 77
Toward the Recognition of Their Educational Rights: Portugalp. 93
Champion in Coeducation: The Netherlandsp. 111
Politics and Anticlericalism: Belgiump. 121
Lutheranism and Democracy: Scandinaviap. 133
Nation-Building, Patriotism, and Women's Citizenship: Bulgaria in Southeastern Europep. 149
From an Exclusive Privilege to a Right and an Obligation: Modern Russiap. 165
Europeans and the American Model of Girls' Secondary Educationp. 181
Crossing Borders in Girls' Secondary Educationp. 191
Contributorsp. 203
English-language Bibliographyp. 207
Indexp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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