Catalogue

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When peace fails : lessons from Belfast for the Middle East /
Thomas G. Mitchell.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2010.
description
vi, 254 p.
ISBN
0786448520 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786448524 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2010.
isbn
0786448520 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786448524 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Natives and settlers making peace -- The Oslo process -- The Oslo process -- The peace process stalls -- Barak tries to make peace -- The Northern Ireland peace process -- The Belfast Agreement -- The peace process collapses -- The agreement saved.
abstract
"Beginning with a review of the literature and theory relevant to peace and conflict studies, offers clear explanations of the Northern Ireland process, how it was saved, and the Oslo peace process of the Middle East. Lessons are drawn from both situations, offering guidance for mediators, activists, and leaders dealing with ongoing ethnic or national conflicts"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7150205
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Thomas G. Mitchell is the author of numerous books on such topics as Israel, Northern Ireland, and antebellum American history. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-01-01:
Mitchell, a self-styled historian who has authored several books on ethnopolitical conflicts ranging from the US Civil War era to settler societies abroad, presents a close comparative study of peacemaking pitfalls in two such societies--Northern Ireland and Israel-Palestine. He covers the dynamics of conflict and negotiation, including the role of third parties and spoilers, and the circumstances leading to breakdown or backsliding before and after agreements. Several recent studies, such as those by Barbara F. Walter, have sought statistical correlates of peacemaking success/failure. Mitchell's narrative case approach fills in many details and circumstances. However, he relies on the limited available memoirs and journalistic accounts and stretches some points, for example, inferring Yassir Arafat's motives based on others' suppositions, or asserting that US leaders' religious support for Israel mattered significantly. Some points lack references altogether, while others take off from politically biased commentators. Though not completely systematic and comprehensive in treatment of the two cases, and despite a few typos, the book is nevertheless thought provoking, especially in "lessons learned" regarding the unfolding patterns of talks. It is stimulating for general and undergraduate readers as well as more advanced students. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. F. S. Pearson Wayne State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2010
Choice, January 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"Beginning with a review of the literature and theory relevant to peace and conflict studies, offers clear explanations of the Northern Ireland process, how it was saved, and the Oslo peace process of the Middle East. Lessons are drawn from both situations, offering guidance for mediators, activists, and leaders dealing with ongoing ethnic or national conflicts"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
In a world torn by political strife, mediation and conflict resolution offer hope for global stability. This timely book examines the peace processes in Northern Ireland, where a peace negotiation has been enacted, and the Middle East, a region still in need of peace. Beginning with a review of the literature and theory relevant to peace and conflict studies, the text offers clear, nuanced explanations of the Northern Ireland process, including how it was saved, and the Oslo peace process of the Middle East. Lessons are drawn from both situations, offering guidance for mediators, activists, and leaders dealing with ongoing ethnic or national conflicts.
Table of Contents
Acronymsp. vi
Prefacep. 1
Natives and Settlers Making Peacep. 5
The Oslo Process
A Dialogue in Oslop. 27
The Peace Process Stallsp. 48
Camp David 2000p. 64
The Northern Ireland Peace Process
The Belfast Agreementp. 93
The Peace Process Collapsesp. 131
The Agreement Savedp. 171
Conclusionp. 205
Epiloguep. 225
Chapter Notesp. 229
Bibliographyp. 247
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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