Catalogue


From Douglass to Duvalier : U.S. African Americans, Haiti and Pan Americanism, 1870-1964 /
Millery Polyné.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2010.
description
xvi, 292 p.
ISBN
0813034728 (alk. paper), 9780813034720 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2010.
isbn
0813034728 (alk. paper)
9780813034720 (alk. paper)
contents note
"The spirit of the age . . . establish[es] a sentiment of universal brotherhood": Haiti, "Santo Domingo" and Frederick Douglass at the intersection of the United States and black Pan Americanism -- "To combine the training of the head and the hands": the 1930 Robert R. Moton Education Commission in Haiti -- "We cast in our lot with the policy of good neighborliness": Claude Barnett, Haiti and the business of race -- "What happens in Haiti has repercussions which far transcend Haiti itself": Walter White, Haiti and the public relations campaign, 1947-1955 -- "To carry the dance of the people beyond": Jean-lon Destin, Lavinia Williams and Danse Folklorique Haitienne -- "The moody republic and the men in her life": Francois Duvalier, U.S. African Americans and Haitian exiles, 1957-1964.
catalogue key
7150059
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-12-01:
Pan Americanism is normally considered a tool of imperialism, an ideology espoused by North Americans to wean Latin Americans from European powers. As such, many Latinos remained wary and skeptical of it. This imaginative work examines a series of episodes in the first century of US-Haitian relations in which US African Americans and Haitians attempted to use these idealized tenets of Pan Americanism to promote racial equality and strengthen Haiti's social, economic, and political growth and stability. Using Pan Americanism rather than Pan Africanism or black nationalism enabled US African Americans to affirm their loyalty to Washington while also tapping into US financial and technical assistance critical to Haitian development. Haitians and African Americans were able to challenge a US-centered inter-American system in order to empower themselves and insulate their culture. Most works on Haiti tend to focus either on the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) or the more recent era of Jean Bertrand Aristide (1991-2004), and specifically the US-supported coup in 2004. In excluding these two seismic eras, Polyne (NYU) tells a more important story of the forging and gradual weakening of ties between US African Americans and Haitians. Impressive temporally and thematically, well researched, and destined to be an important work. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through researchers/faculty. W. M. Weis Illinois Wesleyan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2010
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"A remarkable new analysis of how African Americans and Haitians interacted over the long term. It asserts bold new methods and conclusions on inter-American relations, Pan Americanism, and U.S.-Haitian relations."--David Sheinin, Trent University "Adds an important and much-needed layer to our understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of diasporic relations."--Carol Anderson, Emory University Haiti has long been both a source of immense pride--because of the Haitian Revolution--and of profound disappointment--because of the unshakable realities of poverty, political instability, and violence--to the black diasporic imagination. Charting the long history of these multiple meanings is the focus of Millery Polyne's rich and critical transnational history of U.S. African Americans and Haitians. Stretching from the thoughts and words of American intellectuals such as Frederick Douglass, Robert Moton, and Claude Barnett to the Civil Rights era, Polyne's temporal scope is breathtaking. But just as impressive is the thematic range of the work, which carefully examines the political, economic, and cultural relations between U.S. African Americans and Haitians. From Douglass to Duvalierexamines the creative and critical ways U.S. African Americans and Haitians engaged the idealized tenets of Pan Americanism--mutual cooperation, egalitarianism, and nonintervention between nation-states--in order to strengthen Haiti's social, economic, and political growth and stability. The depth of Polyne's research allows him to speak confidently about the convoluted ways that these groups have viewed modernization, "uplift," and racial unity, as well as the shifting meanings and importance of the concepts over time. A volume in the series New World Diasporas, edited by Kevin A. Yelvington
Description for Bookstore
"Polyneacute; has provided a clearly written, nuanced, deeply researched study about the multiple efforts among the Haitian and African American elite to advance both their national agendas and larger global commitments to the diaspora. No one has focused on Haiti the way he has." --Carol Anderson, Emory University "A remarkable new analysis of how African Americans and Haitians interacted over the long term. It asserts bold new methods and conclusions on inter-American relations, Pan Americanism, and U.S.-Haitian relations."--David Sheinin, Trent University "Adds an important and much-needed layer to our understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of diasporic relations."--Carol Anderson, Emory University Haiti has long been both a source of immense pride--because of the Haitian Revolution--and of profound disappointment--because of the unshakable realities of poverty, political instability, and violence--to the black diasporic imagination. Charting the long history of these multiple meanings is the focus of Millery Polyne's rich and critical transnational history of U.S. African Americans and Haitians. Stretching from the thoughts and words of American intellectuals such as Frederick Douglass, Robert Moton, and Claude Barnett to the Civil Rights era, Polyne's temporal scope is breathtaking. But just as impressive is the thematic range of the work, which carefully examines the political, economic, and cultural relations between U.S. African Americans and Haitians. From Douglass to Duvalierexamines the creative and critical ways U.S. African Americans and Haitians engaged the idealized tenets of Pan Americanism--mutual cooperation, egalitarianism, and nonintervention between nation-states--in order to strengthen Haiti's social, economic, and political growth and stability. The depth of Polyne's research allows him to speak confidently about the convoluted ways that these groups have viewed modernization, "uplift," and racial unity, as well as the shifting meanings and importance of the concepts over time. A volume in the series New World Diasporas, edited by Kevin A. Yelvington
Description for Bookstore
"Polyné has provided a clearly written, nuanced, deeply researched study about the multiple efforts among the Haitian and African American elite to advance both their national agendas and larger global commitments to the diaspora. No one has focused on Haiti the way he has." --Carol Anderson, Emory University "A remarkable new analysis of how African Americans and Haitians interacted over the long term. It asserts bold new methods and conclusions on inter-American relations, Pan Americanism, and U.S.-Haitian relations."--David Sheinin, Trent University "Adds an important and much-needed layer to our understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of diasporic relations."--Carol Anderson, Emory University Haiti has long been both a source of immense pride--because of the Haitian Revolution--and of profound disappointment--because of the unshakable realities of poverty, political instability, and violence--to the black diasporic imagination. Charting the long history of these multiple meanings is the focus of Millery Polyne's rich and critical transnational history of U.S. African Americans and Haitians. Stretching from the thoughts and words of American intellectuals such as Frederick Douglass, Robert Moton, and Claude Barnett to the Civil Rights era, Polyne's temporal scope is breathtaking. But just as impressive is the thematic range of the work, which carefully examines the political, economic, and cultural relations between U.S. African Americans and Haitians. From Douglass to Duvalierexamines the creative and critical ways U.S. African Americans and Haitians engaged the idealized tenets of Pan Americanism--mutual cooperation, egalitarianism, and nonintervention between nation-states--in order to strengthen Haiti's social, economic, and political growth and stability. The depth of Polyne's research allows him to speak confidently about the convoluted ways that these groups have viewed modernization, "uplift," and racial unity, as well as the shifting meanings and importance of the concepts over time. A volume in the series New World Diasporas, edited by Kevin A. Yelvington
Description for Bookstore
“Polyn has provided a clearly written, nuanced, deeply researched study about the multiple efforts among the Haitian and African American elite to advance both their national agendas and larger global commitments to the diaspora. No one has focused on Haiti the way he has.” --Carol Anderson, Emory University "A remarkable new analysis of how African Americans and Haitians interacted over the long term. It asserts bold new methods and conclusions on inter-American relations, Pan Americanism, and U.S.-Haitian relations."--David Sheinin, Trent University "Adds an important and much-needed layer to our understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of diasporic relations."--Carol Anderson, Emory University Haiti has long been both a source of immense pride--because of the Haitian Revolution--and of profound disappointment--because of the unshakable realities of poverty, political instability, and violence--to the black diasporic imagination. Charting the long history of these multiple meanings is the focus of Millery Polyne's rich and critical transnational history of U.S. African Americans and Haitians. Stretching from the thoughts and words of American intellectuals such as Frederick Douglass, Robert Moton, and Claude Barnett to the Civil Rights era, Polyne's temporal scope is breathtaking. But just as impressive is the thematic range of the work, which carefully examines the political, economic, and cultural relations between U.S. African Americans and Haitians. From Douglass to Duvalierexamines the creative and critical ways U.S. African Americans and Haitians engaged the idealized tenets of Pan Americanism--mutual cooperation, egalitarianism, and nonintervention between nation-states--in order to strengthen Haiti's social, economic, and political growth and stability. The depth of Polyne's research allows him to speak confidently about the convoluted ways that these groups have viewed modernization, "uplift," and racial unity, as well as the shifting meanings and importance of the concepts over time. A volume in the series New World Diasporas, edited by Kevin A. Yelvington
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Note on Usage and Terminologyp. xv
Introductionp. 1
"The Spirit of the Age ... Establish[es] a Sentiment of Universal Brotherhood": Haiti, "Santo Domingo" and Frederick Douglass at the Intersection of the United States and Black Pan Americanismp. 25
"To Combine the Training of the Head and the Hands": The 1930 Robert R. Moton Education Commission in Haitip. 56
"We Cast in Our Lot with the Policy of Good Neighborliness": Claude Barnett, Haiti and the Business of Racep. 89
"What Happens in Haiti Has Repercussions Which Far Transcend Haiti Itself": Walter White, Haiti and the Public Relations Campaign, 1947-1955p. 131
"To Carry the Dance of the People Beyond"p. 154
"The Moody Republic and the Men in Her Life": François Duvalier, U.S. African Americans and Haitian Exiles, 1957-1964p. 180
Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 245
Indexp. 269
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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