Catalogue


Friends and strangers : the making of a Creole culture in colonial Pennsylvania /
John Smolenski.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.
description
viii, 401 p.
ISBN
0812242394 (hardcover : acid-free paper), 9780812242393 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.
isbn
0812242394 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
9780812242393 (hardcover : acid-free paper)
contents note
The origins of Quaker Pennsylvania -- Quakerism's English roots -- William Penn settles his colony: the problem of legitimacy in early Pennsylvania -- Words and things: contesting civic identity in early Pennsylvania -- "Bastard Quakers" in America: the Keithian schism and the creation of Creole Quakerism in early Pennsylvania -- Narratives of early Pennsylvania, Part I: life on the colonial borderlands -- Narratives of early Pennsylvania, Part II: the founding of Pennsylvania -- The parables of Pennsylvania politics: the power of Quaker mythology -- Conclusion: Caleb Pusey Miller, philosopher, man of letters.
catalogue key
7150038
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-02-01:
Smolenski (Univ. of California, Davis) examines how Pennsylvania's governing culture evolved between 1680 and 1730. He begins with the evolution of Quakerism in England before focusing on how William Penn's plan for the colony conflicted with the reality of clashing provincial politics and culture during a period of imperial upheaval. Smolenski analyzes these developments through the lens of creolization, "the creative process through which individuals and groups constructed new cultural habits and identities" as they tried to establish European "inheritances" in the Americas. This included, for Penn and for Smolenski, relations between the colony and Native Americans. Penn hoped his utopian settlement would "creolize" non-Quaker residents, but instead, as Smolenski shows, the colony's leadership and institutions were themselves creolized during the half century of internal conflicts and struggles with the Penn family and imperial authorities. After 1700, this conflict ironically shaped a common narrative--a "creole civic culture"--depicting the colony's Quaker origins as the source of their unique prosperity, civil peace, and religious liberty. Although the book focuses on the emergence of Pennsylvania's political culture, it has implications for the larger question of American identity. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and higher. D. R. Mandell Truman State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An excellent retelling of the political history of an extraordinary colonial experiment. . . . Focusing on creolization allows Smolenski to root Pennsylvania politics in Quaker culture while also providing the basis for useful comparisons with the experiences of other charter groups in the colonial Atlantic."- Journal of American History
"An excellent retelling of the political history of an extraordinary colonial experiment. . . . Focusing on creolization allows Smolenski to root Pennsylvania politics in Quaker culture while also providing the basis for useful comparisons with the experiences of other charter groups in the colonial Atlantic."-- Journal of American History
"InFriends and Strangers, John Smolenski balances the need for a fresh narrative of early Pennsylvania with a subtle analysis of the emergence of a 'creole culture.' His book both forces us to think about the parallel experiences of Anglo- and Latin America, and about white and black encounters, while also setting the stage for a reconsideration of the classic question of 'Americanization.'"-John Brooke, author ofThe Refiner's Fire: The Making of Mormon Cosmology, 1644-1844
"In Friends and Strangers , John Smolenski balances the need for a fresh narrative of early Pennsylvania with a subtle analysis of the emergence of a 'creole culture.' His book forces us to think both about the parallel experiences of Anglo- and Latin America, and about white and black encounters, while also setting the stage for a reconsideration of the classic question of 'Americanization.'"--John L. Brooke, author of The Refiner's Fire: The Making of Mormon Cosmology, 1644-1844
"In Friends and Strangers , John Smolenski balances the need for a fresh narrative of early Pennsylvania with a subtle analysis of the emergence of a 'creole culture.' His book forces us to think both about the parallel experiences of Anglo- and Latin America, and about white and black encounters, while also setting the stage for a reconsideration of the classic question of 'Americanization.'"-John L. Brooke, author of The Refiner's Fire: The Making of Mormon Cosmology, 1644-1844
"InFriends and Strangers, John Smolenski balances the need for a fresh narrative of early Pennsylvania with a subtle analysis of the emergence of a 'creole culture.' His book forces us to think both about the parallel experiences of Anglo- and Latin America, and about white and black encounters, while also setting the stage for a reconsideration of the classic question of 'Americanization.'"-John L. Brooke, author ofThe Refiner's Fire: The Making of Mormon Cosmology, 1644-1844
"John Smolenski's refreshing Friends and Strangers gives us a Pennsylvania all the more vibrant for being made in America. Here, real Quakers, unsure and often disputatious, grappled with each other and with Indians to shape the unexpectedly creole colony Pennsylvania had become by 1720, usually against William Penn's wishes. Smolenski's Pennsylvania is far more interesting, notably more American, and even more compelling than Edward Hick's idealized 'Peaceable Kingdom' paintings of the 1830s ever conveyed. Friends and Strangers brings a wonderful realism to early Pennsylvania's surprisingly bumptious history."--Jon Butler, Yale University
"John Smolenski's refreshing Friends and Strangers gives us a Pennsylvania all the more vibrant for being made in America. Here, real Quakers, unsure and often disputatious, grappled with each other and with Indians to shape the unexpectedly creole colony Pennsylvania had become by 1720, usually against William Penn's wishes. Smolenski's Pennsylvania is far more interesting, notably more American, and even more compelling than Edward Hick's idealized 'Peaceable Kingdom' paintings of the 1830s ever conveyed. Friends and Strangers brings a wonderful realism to early Pennsylvania's surprisingly bumptious history."-Jon Butler, Yale University
"John Smolenski's refreshingFriends and Strangersgives us a Pennsylvania all the more vibrant for being made in America. Here, real Quakers, unsure and often disputatious, grappled with each other and with Indians to shape the unexpectedly creole colony Pennsylvania had become by 1720, usually against William Penn's wishes. Smolenski's Pennsylvania is far more interesting, notably more American, and even more compelling than Edward Hick's idealized 'Peaceable Kingdom' paintings of the 1830s ever conveyed.Friends and Strangersbrings a wonderful realism to early Pennsylvania's surprisingly bumptious history."-Jon Butler, Yale University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In its early years, William Penn's "Peaceable Kingdom" was anything but. Pennsylvania's governing institutions were faced with daunting challenges: Native Americans proved far less docile than Penn had hoped, the colony's non-English settlers were loathe to accept Quaker authority, and the Friends themselves were divided by grievous factional struggles. Yet out of this chaos emerged a colony hailed by contemporary and modern observers alike as the most liberal, tolerant, and harmonious in British America. InFriends and Strangers, John Smolenski argues that Pennsylvania's early history can best be understood through the lens of creolization-the process by which Old World habits, values, and practices were transformed in a New World setting. Unable simply to transplant English political and legal traditions across the Atlantic, Quaker leaders gradually forged a creole civic culture that secured Quaker authority in an increasingly diverse colony. By mythologizing the colony's early settlement and casting Friends as the ideal guardians of its uniquely free and peaceful society, they succeeded in establishing a shared civic culture in which Quaker dominance seemed natural and just. The first history of Pennsylvania's founding in more than forty years,Friends and Strangersoffers a provocative new look at the transfer of English culture to North America. Setting Pennsylvania in the context of the broader Atlantic phenomenon of creolization, Smolenski's account of the Quaker colony's origins reveals the vital role this process played in creating early American society.
Main Description
In its early years, William Penn's "Peaceable Kingdom" was anything but. Pennsylvania's governing institutions were faced with daunting challenges: Native Americans proved far less docile than Penn had hoped, the colony's non-English settlers were loath to accept Quaker authority, and Friends themselves were divided by grievous factional struggles. Yet out of this chaos emerged a colony hailed by contemporary and modern observers alike as the most liberal, tolerant, and harmonious in British America. In Friends and Strangers , John Smolenski argues that Pennsylvania's early history can best be understood through the lens of creolization--the process by which Old World habits, values, and practices were transformed in a New World setting. Unable simply to transplant English political and legal traditions across the Atlantic, Quaker leaders gradually forged a creole civic culture that secured Quaker authority in an increasingly diverse colony. By mythologizing the colony's early settlement and casting Friends as the ideal guardians of its uniquely free and peaceful society, they succeeded in establishing a shared civic culture in which Quaker dominance seemed natural and just. The first history of Pennsylvania's founding in more than forty years, Friends and Strangers offers a provocative new look at the transfer of English culture to North America. Setting Pennsylvania in the context of the broader Atlantic phenomenon of creolization, Smolenski's account of the Quaker colony's origins reveals the vital role this process played in creating early American society.
Main Description
In its early years, William Penn's "Peaceable Kingdom" was anything but. Pennsylvania's governing institutions were faced with daunting challenges: Native Americans proved far less docile than Penn had hoped, the colony's non-English settlers were loath to accept Quaker authority, and Friends themselves were divided by grievous factional struggles. Yet out of this chaos emerged a colony hailed by contemporary and modern observers alike as the most liberal, tolerant, and harmonious in British America. In Friends and Strangers , John Smolenski argues that Pennsylvania's early history can best be understood through the lens of creolization-the process by which Old World habits, values, and practices were transformed in a New World setting. Unable simply to transplant English political and legal traditions across the Atlantic, Quaker leaders gradually forged a creole civic culture that secured Quaker authority in an increasingly diverse colony. By mythologizing the colony's early settlement and casting Friends as the ideal guardians of its uniquely free and peaceful society, they succeeded in establishing a shared civic culture in which Quaker dominance seemed natural and just. The first history of Pennsylvania's founding in more than forty years, Friends and Strangers offers a provocative new look at the transfer of English culture to North America. Setting Pennsylvania in the context of the broader Atlantic phenomenon of creolization, Smolenski's account of the Quaker colony's origins reveals the vital role this process played in creating early American society.
Main Description
In its early years, William Penn's "Peaceable Kingdom" was anything but. Pennsylvania's governing institutions were faced with daunting challenges: Native Americans proved far less docile than Penn had hoped, the colony's non-English settlers were loath to accept Quaker authority, and Friends themselves were divided by grievous factional struggles. Yet out of this chaos emerged a colony hailed by contemporary and modern observers alike as the most liberal, tolerant, and harmonious in British America. InFriends and Strangers, John Smolenski argues that Pennsylvania's early history can best be understood through the lens of creolization-the process by which Old World habits, values, and practices were transformed in a New World setting. Unable simply to transplant English political and legal traditions across the Atlantic, Quaker leaders gradually forged a creole civic culture that secured Quaker authority in an increasingly diverse colony. By mythologizing the colony's early settlement and casting Friends as the ideal guardians of its uniquely free and peaceful society, they succeeded in establishing a shared civic culture in which Quaker dominance seemed natural and just. The first history of Pennsylvania's founding in more than forty years,Friends and Strangersoffers a provocative new look at the transfer of English culture to North America. Setting Pennsylvania in the context of the broader Atlantic phenomenon of creolization, Smolenski's account of the Quaker colony's origins reveals the vital role this process played in creating early American society.
Main Description
In its early years, William Penn's "Peaceable Kingdom" was anything but. Pennsylvania's governing institutions were faced with daunting challenges: Native Americans proved far less docile than Penn had hoped, the colony's non-English settlers were loath to accept Quaker authority, and tFriends themselves were divided by grievous factional struggles. Yet out of this chaos emerged a colony hailed by contemporary and modern observers alike as the most liberal, tolerant, and harmonious in British America. InFriends and Strangers, John Smolenski argues that Pennsylvania's early history can best be understood through the lens of creolization-the process by which Old World habits, values, and practices were transformed in a New World setting. Unable simply to transplant English political and legal traditions across the Atlantic, Quaker leaders gradually forged a creole civic culture that secured Quaker authority in an increasingly diverse colony. By mythologizing the colony's early settlement and casting Friends as the ideal guardians of its uniquely free and peaceful society, they succeeded in establishing a shared civic culture in which Quaker dominance seemed natural and just. The first history of Pennsylvania's founding in more than forty years,Friends and Strangersoffers a provocative new look at the transfer of English culture to North America. Setting Pennsylvania in the context of the broader Atlantic phenomenon of creolization, Smolenski's account of the Quaker colony's origins reveals the vital role this process played in creating early American society.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The Origins of Quaker Pennsylvaniap. 1
Beginnings
Quakerism's English Rootsp. 15
Disorder
William Penn Settles His Colony: The Problem of Legitimacy in Early Pennsylvaniap. 61
Words and Things: Contesting Civic Identity in Early Pennsylvaniap. 104
“Bastard Quakers” in America: The Keithian Schism and the Creation of Creole Quakerism in Early Pennsylvaniap. 149
Narratives of Early Pennsylvania, I: Life on the Colonial Borderlandsp. 178
Triumph
Narratives of Early Pennsylvania, II: The Founding of Pennsylvaniap. 215
The Parables of Pennsylvania Politics: The Power of Quaker Mythologyp. 249
Conclusion: Caleb Pusey, Miller Philosopher and Man of Lettersp. 286
List of Abbreviationsp. 297
Notesp. 301
Indexp. 387
Acknowledgmentsp. 397
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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