Catalogue

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Riot in Alexandria : tradition and group dynamics in late antique pagan and Christian communities /
Edward J. Watts.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
description
xv, 290 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520262077 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520262072 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
isbn
0520262077 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520262072 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
The anatomy of a riot -- Personal legacy and scholastic identity -- Past, present, and future in late Neoplatonic historical discourse -- History and the shape of monastic communities -- Anti-Chalcedonian ascetics and their student associates -- Creating the legend of the Alexandrian bishop -- Theophilus and Cyril : the Alexandrian bishop triumphant -- Peter Mongus struggles with the past.
catalogue key
7146404
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 269-284) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
PSP Prose Awards, USA, 2010 : Nominated
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"An extremely important work on the shaping of historical identities in late antiquity, Riot in Alexandriasolidifies Watts' position as one of the leading commentators on late antique intellectual life."--Christopher Haas, author of Alexandria in Late Antiquity: Topography and Social Conflict
Flap Copy
"An extremely important work on the shaping of historical identities in late antiquity,Riot in Alexandriasolidifies Watts' position as one of the leading commentators on late antique intellectual life."--Christopher Haas, author ofAlexandria in Late Antiquity: Topography and Social Conflict
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A commendable account of campus life, student Christian activism, and episcopal oversight in Alexandria."-- Jrnl of Theological Studies
"A noteworthy contribution to the study of Late Antiquity."-- Bryn Mawr Classical Review (Bmcr)
"There is much here to admire."-- Church History Stds In Christiany And Culture
"Watts deftly weds a minutely detailed examination of a specific event to wider macro-history."-- Prudentia
"Watts makes the people and events vivid and relevant to the reader."-- Book News
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study uses one well-documented moment of violence as a starting point for a wide-ranging examination of the ideas and interactions of pagan philosophers, Christian ascetics, and bishops from the fourth to the early seventh century.
Main Description
This innovative study uses one well-documented moment of violence as a starting point for a wide-ranging examination of the ideas and interactions of pagan philosophers, Christian ascetics, and bishops from the fourth to the early seventh century. Edward J. Watts reconstructs a riot that erupted in Alexandria in 486 when a group of students attacked a Christian adolescent who had publicly insulted the students' teachers. Pagan students, Christians affiliated with a local monastery, and the Alexandrian ecclesiastical leaders all cast the incident in a different light, and each group tried with that interpretation to influence subsequent events. Watts, drawing on Greek, Latin, Coptic, and Syriac sources, shows how historical traditions and notions of a shared past shaped the interactions and behavior of these high-profile communities. Connecting oral and written texts to the personal relationships that gave them meaning and to the actions that gave them form, Riot in Alexandriadraws new attention to the understudied social and cultural history of the later fifth-century Roman world and at the same time opens a new window on late antique intellectual life.
Main Description
This innovative study uses one well-documented moment of violence as a starting point for a wide-ranging examination of the ideas and interactions of pagan philosophers, Christian ascetics, and bishops from the fourth to the early seventh century. Edward J. Watts reconstructs a riot that erupted in Alexandria in 486 when a group of students attacked a Christian adolescent who had publicly insulted the students' teachers. Pagan students, Christians affiliated with a local monastery, and the Alexandrian ecclesiastical leaders all cast the incident in a different light, and each group tried with that interpretation to influence subsequent events. Watts, drawing on Greek, Latin, Coptic, and Syriac sources, shows how historical traditions and notions of a shared past shaped the interactions and behavior of these high-profile communities. Connecting oral and written texts to the personal relationships that gave them meaning and to the actions that gave them form,Riot in Alexandriadraws new attention to the understudied social and cultural history of the later fifth-century Roman world and at the same time opens a new window on late antique intellectual life.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
The Anatomy of a Riotp. 1
Historical Discourse in Intellectual Communitiesp. 23
Personal Legacy and Scholastic Identityp. 29
Internal Historical Discourse and Its Transmission: The Example of Eunapiusp. 33
Defending Communal Historical Discourse: Porphyry's Life of Plotinusp. 45
Past, Present, and Future in Late Neoplatonic Historical Discoursep. 53
The Life of Isidore and its Sourcesp. 54
Eating, Drinking, and Learning Neoplatonic Historyp. 60
Oral Tradition and Scholastic Identity in the Alexandrian Schools of the 480sp. 62
Paralius's Beating within its Scholastic Contextp. 65
Fifth-Century Christian Violence in Neoplatonic Communal Memoryp. 71
Teaching Ethics after the Riotp. 78
The Past Within and Outside Late Antique Monasteriesp. 89
History and the Shape of Monastic Communitiesp. 95
The Koinoniap. 99
The Historia Monachorum and Visitors' Exposure to Ascetic Oral Traditionsp. 107
Social Relations and the Power of the Master: Barsanuphius and Johnp. 114
Anti-Chalcedonian Ascetics and their Student Associatesp. 123
The Limits of Ascetic Influencep. 124
Finding the Ascetic and Intellectual Balancep. 130
The Ascetic and Sophistic Mélange of Zacharias Scholasticusp. 138
A Student Riot and its Commemoration: The "Life of Paralius"p. 142
Defining the Alexandrian Bishopp. 155
Creating the Legend of the Alexandrian Bishopp. 163
Mechanisms of Episcopal Powerp. 165
Athanasius and the Politics of Self-Definitionp. 172
Athanasius's Restoration and Redefinitionp. 175
The Athanasian Historical Legacyp. 182
Theophilus and Cyril: The Alexandrian Bishop Triumphantp. 190
Theophilus and the Historical Character of Athanasiusp. 191
The Legacy of Theophilusp. 205
Peter Mongus Struggles with the Pastp. 216
Chalcedon and the Redefinition of the Alexandrian Bishopp. 217
Peter Mongus and Resistance in an Age of Compromisep. 229
Peter Mongus and the Beating of Paraliusp. 234
A Riot's Aftermathp. 243
Conclusionp. 254
Dating the Riotp. 263
How Much Should We Trust Zacharias Scholasticus?p. 265
Bibliographyp. 269
Indexp. 285
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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