Catalogue


Race, ethnicity, and disability : veterans and benefits in post-Civil War America /
Larry M. Logue, Peter Blanck ; [with a foreword by Dick Thornburgh].
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
xxii, 215 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
052151634X (Cloth), 9780521516341 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
052151634X (Cloth)
9780521516341 (Cloth)
abstract
"Using data from more than 40,000 soldiers of the Union army, this book focuses on the experience of African Americans and immigrants with disabilities, investigating their decision to seek government assistance and their resulting treatment. Pension administrators treated these ex-soldiers differently from native-born whites, but the discrimination was far from seamless - biased evaluations of worthiness intensified in response to administrators' workload and nativists' late-nineteenth-century campaigns. This book finds a remarkable interplay of social concepts, historical context, bureaucratic expediency, and individual initiative. Examining how African Americans and immigrants weighed their circumstances in deciding when to request a pension, employ a pension attorney, or if seek institutionalization, it contends that these veterans quietly asserted their right to benefits. Shedding new light on the long history of challenges faced by veterans with disabilities, the book underscores the persistence of these challenges in spite of the recent revolution in disability rights"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7139715
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-212) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Larry M. Logue is Professor of History and Political Science at Mississippi College. He won the Francis and Emily Chipman First-Book Prize for A Sermon in the Desert: Belief and Behavior in Early St. George, Utah, and is the author of To Appomattox and Beyond: The Civil War Soldier in War and Peace and co-editor of The Civil War Soldier: A Historical Reader and The Civil War Veteran: A Historical Reader. Peter Blanck is a University Professor at Syracuse University and Chairman of the Burton Blatt Institute (BBI). He is a trustee of YAI/National Institute for People with Disabilities Network and Chairman of the Global; Universal Design Commission (GUDC). Blanck's most recent book is Disability Civil Rights Law and Policy (with Hill, Siegal, and Waterstone).
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book focuses on the post-Civil War experience of African Americans and immigrants, investigating their decisions and assessing their resulting treatment. It contends that discrimination was far from seamless but instead shows that individual veterans quietly asserted their rights, while examining how African Americans and immigrants weighed their circumstances when seeking government assistance.
Main Description
Using data from more than 40,000 soldiers of the Union army, this book focuses on the experience of African Americans and immigrants with disabilities, investigating their decision to seek government assistance and their resulting treatment. Pension administrators treated these ex-soldiers differently from native-born whites, but the discrimination was far from seamless - biased evaluations of worthiness intensified in response to administrators' workload and nativists' late-nineteenth-century campaigns. This book finds a remarkable interplay of social concepts, historical context, bureaucratic expediency, and individual initiative. Examining how African Americans and immigrants weighed their circumstances in deciding when to request a pension, whether to employ a pension attorney, or if they should seek institutionalization, it contends that these veterans quietly asserted their right to benefits. Shedding new light on the long history of challenges faced by veterans with disabilities, the book underscores the persistence of these challenges in spite of the recent revolution in disability rights.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using data from more than 40,000 soldiers of the Union army, this text focuses on the experience of African Americans and immigrants with disabilities, investigating their decision to seek government assistance and their resulting treatment.
Table of Contents
Tables and Figurep. ix
Illustrationsp. xiii
Abbreviated Citations in Notesp. xv
Forewordp. xvii
Acknowledgmentsp. xxi
Introductionp. 1
The Winding Path of the Self and the Otherp. 9
The Moral Economy of Veterans' Benefitsp. 23
African-American Veterans and the Pension Systemp. 41
Pensions for Foreign-Born Veteransp. 83
"A More Infamous Gang of Cut-Throats Never Lived"p. 111
Havens of Last Resortp. 129
Epiloguep. 145
Appendixp. 155
Notesp. 161
Bibliographyp. 197
Indexp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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