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Teachers and human rights education /
Audrey Osler and Hugh Starkey.
imprint
Stoke-on-Trent, UK : Trentham Books, 2010.
description
xiii, 166 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1858563844 (Paper), 9781858563848 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Stoke-on-Trent, UK : Trentham Books, 2010.
isbn
1858563844 (Paper)
9781858563848 (Paper)
catalogue key
7135866
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 147-157) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dr Audrey Osler is Visiting Professor at Birkbeck College, University of London and the University of Leeds, where she was founding director of the Centre for Citizenship and Human Rights Education. Dr Hugh Starkey is Reader at the Institute of Education, University of London and Co-director of the International Centre for Education for Democratic Citizenship.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The phrase 'human rights' appears to have become a slogan in need of a definition. Human rights education seems more urgent than ever. This book helps teachers with this vital task and clarifies the relevance of human rights to their everyday work.
Main Description
Campaigners, politicians, and the media regularly cite human rights to justify or challenge actions that range from peaceful protest to military action. The phrase "human rights" appears to have become a slogan in need of a definition. Human rights education seems more urgent than ever. Teachers and Human Rights Educationhelps teachers with this vital task and clarifies the relevance of human rights to their everyday work. The authors draw on a range of international examples to illustrate how schools can enable young people to work towards the ideals of justice and peace in both the school community and the wider world. The application of human rights principles is applied as the basis for living together in diverse societies. The book is a key text for the UN World Program on Human Rights Education 2004-2014 and for distance learning courses on human rights.
Main Description
* How can schools promote democracy? * Whose values should take precedence in multicultural societies? * Can schools safeguard both children's rights and those of teachers? Campaigners, politicians, and the media regularly cite human rights to justify or challenge actions that range from peaceful protest to military action. The phrase "human rights" appears to have become a slogan in need of a definition. Human rights education seems more urgent than ever. "Teachers and Human Rights Education" helps teachers with this vital task and clarifies the relevance of human rights to their everyday work. The authors draw on a range of international examples to illustrate how schools can enable young people to work towards the ideals of justice and peace in both the school community and the wider world. The application of human rights principles is applied as the basis for living together in diverse societies. The book is a key text for the UN World Program on Human Rights Education 2004-2014 and for distance learning courses on human rights.
Main Description
Why do teachers need to be familiar with human rights? In Multicultural societies, whose values take precedence? How do schools resolve tensions between children's rights and teachers' rights?
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Acronyms and abbreviationsp. ix
Forewordp. xi
Human rights: an agenda for action
Three Narrativesp. 1
Contextualising human rightsp. 15
Human rights frameworksp. 27
Human rights, justice and peacep. 43
Politics, cultures and inequalities
Women's human rightsp. 59
Human rights and global changep. 71
Values, cultures and human rightsp. 85
Human rights and democracy in schools
Children's human rightsp. 101
Citizenship education and human rightsp. 113
Human rights, politics and schoolingp. 129
Epiloguep. 143
Referencesp. 147
Indexp. 159
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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