Catalogue


Framing the nation : documentary film in interwar France /
Alison J. Murray Levine.
imprint
New York : Continuum, c2010.
description
xiii, 223 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0826431879 (hbk.), 9780826431875 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Continuum, c2010.
isbn
0826431879 (hbk.)
9780826431875 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7135604
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Alison J. Murray Levine is Assistant Professor of French at the University of Virginia.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...A sound and carefully-craftedaddition to French and film history of the entre-deux-guerres,and one that will certainly be of use to scholars and students in these fields." --H-France
Framing the Nation is a most welcome publication. Interwar documentary has previously been overwhelmingly and undeservedly neglected by scholars of French film. This book makes up for that neglect in no uncertain terms. It is lucid, thoroughly researched and insightful. The productive way it is able to bring together text and context, ideology and political economy is quietly impressive and the kind of prehistory it provides for later and better known French documentary makes it required reading. --Martin O'Shaughnessy, Professor in Film Studies, Nottingham Trent University
"In her thoughtful and well-researched new study Framing the Nation, Alison Murray Levine argues convincingly that the French government used documentary film to help craft national identity in response to domestic and international crises during the interwar period. In doing so, the author demonstrates that state-sponsored French documentary cinema from the 1920s and 1930s serves as a repository for prevailing official discourses around modernization, urbanization, and colonialism. The author examines those discourses -- and the policy decisions to which they led -- in light of the international growth of documentary film as a flourishing new medium. Indeed, Murray Levine does a great service by situating the French contribution to documentary cinema in its proper place in the history of the medium." Andrew Sobanet, Associate Professor of French, Georgetown University
"Murray Levine traces the rise of nonfiction educational film in France during the 1920s, and the impact of the new genre on society. Film historians assert that the overall contribution of France to the development of documentary film was negligible before World War II, but she argues that the interwar examples were in fact of great importance then and remain of great interest now. Her topics include truth peddling, educational film in rural France, educational film in the French colonies, filming the French regions, filming colonial France, and the Vichy propaganda machine." -Eithne O'Leyne, BOOK NEWS, Inc.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title argues that, between World Wars I and II, documentary film made a substantial contribution to the rewriting of the French national narrative to include rural France and the colonies.
Long Description
Framing the Nation: Documentary Film in Interwar France argues that, between World Wars I and II, documentary film made a substantial contribution to the rewriting of the French national narrative to include rural France and the colonies. The book mines a significant body of virtually unknown films and manuscripts for their insight into revisions of French national identity in the aftermath of the Great War. From 1918 onwards, government institutions sought to advance social programs they believed were crucial to national regeneration. They turned to documentary film, a new form of mass communication, to do so. Many scholars of French film state that the French made no significant contribution to documentary film prior to the Vichy period. Using until now overlooked films, Framing the Nation refutes this misconception and shows that the French were early and active believers in the uses of documentary film for social change - and these films reached audiences far beyond the confines of commercial cinema circuits in urban areas. >
Main Description
Argues that interwar documentary film made a substantial contribution to the rewriting of the French national narrative
Main Description
Framing the Nation: Documentary Film in Interwar Franceargues that, between World Wars I and II, documentary film made a substantial contribution to the rewriting of the French national narrative to include rural France and the colonies. The book mines a significant body of virtually unknown films and manuscripts for their insight into revisions of French national identity in the aftermath of the Great War. From 1918 onwards, government institutions sought to advance social programs they believed were crucial to national regeneration. They turned to documentary film, a new form of mass communication, to do so. Many scholars of French film state that the French made no significant contribution to documentary film prior to the Vichy period. Using until now overlooked films,Framing the Nationrefutes this misconception and shows that the French were early and active believers in the uses of documentary film for social change - and these films reached audiences far beyond the confines of commercial cinema circuits in urban areas.
Main Description
Framing the Nation: Documentary Film in Interwar France argues that, between World Wars I and II, documentary film made a substantial contribution to the rewriting of the French national narrative to include rural France and the colonies. This book mines a significant body of virtually unknown films and manuscripts for their insight into revisions of French national identity in the aftermath of the Great War. From 1918 onwards, government institutions sought to advance social programs they believed were crucial to national regeneration. They turned to documentary film, a new form of mass communication, to do so.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Truth Peddling: Documentary Film in Interwar Francep. 12
The Revolt of the Beets: Educational Film in Rural Francep. 36
"Making the Fiction of the Empire a Reality": Educational Film in the French Coloniesp. 56
"Mysterious and Subtle Cheesemaking": Filming the French Regionsp. 89
"Carcasses of Manioc-Eaters": Filming Colonial Francep. 115
Recycling Rural Images: The Vichy Propaganda Machinep. 150
Notesp. 165
Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 215
Film Indexp. 221
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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