Catalogue


Personal effects : reading the journal of Marie Bashkirtseff /
Sonia Wilson.
imprint
London : Legenda, 2010.
description
159 p. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
1906540136, 9781906540135
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Legenda, 2010.
isbn
1906540136
9781906540135
catalogue key
7133594
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [149]-154) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Sonia Wilson is Lecturer in French at the University of Sydney.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Wilson's account is fascinating and throws light upon feminist controversy in late nineteenth-century England and the European continent.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Five months before her death of tuberculosis in 1884, Marie Bashkirtseff, an aspiring artist and a would-be mondaine, composed a preface to her personal diary. In it, she brazenly declared that in the event of her early death her diary was to be published. Three years later, a truncated version of the diary appeared. Translated into English, championed by Barres and Gladstone, taken up by young diarists from France to the US, the diary created a major sensation, remaining standard reading for young women in both the anglophone and francophone worlds until the 1930s.The first full-length study to explore the questions that reading Bashkirtseff's journal raises with respect to both genre and gender construction, Personal Effects examines the genre and gender issues at stake in Bashkirtseff's bid to go public with the personal, and explores the discursive strategies by which Bashkirtseff writes her journal from the private context of its keeping to a public context of reading. Wilson reads the diary as a performance of writing, one in which a display of the personal mediates between the subjective and the social, the private and the public.
Main Description
Five months before her death of tuberculosis in 1884, Marie Bashkirtseff, an aspiring artist and a would-be mondaine, composed a preface to her personal diary. In it, she brazenly declared that in the event of her early death her diary was to be published. Three years later, a truncated version of the diary appeared. Translated into English, championed by Barrs and Gladstone, taken up by young diarists from France to the US, the diary created a major sensation, remaining standard reading for young women in both the anglophone and francophone worlds until the 1930s.The first full-length study to explore the questions that reading Bashkirtseff's journal raises with respect to both genre and gender construction, Personal Effects examines the genre and gender issues at stake in Bashkirtseff's bid to go public with the personal, and explores the discursive strategies by which Bashkirtseff writes her journal from the private context of its keeping to a public context of reading. Wilson reads the diary as a performance of writing, one in which a display of the personal mediates between the subjective and the social, the private and the public.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Note on Editions, Translations and Termsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Making an Exhibition of Oneself: The Prefacep. 25
Show and Tell: The Reader within the Diaryp. 47
On Display: The Details of Dressp. 83
Living On: Forms of Cultural Afterlifep. 105
Conclusionp. 141
Bibliographyp. 149
Indexp. 155
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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