Catalogue

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Parents of poor children in England, 1580-1800 /
Patricia Crawford.
imprint
oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2010.
description
xi, 361 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199204802 (hbk.), 9780199204809 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2010.
isbn
0199204802 (hbk.)
9780199204809 (hbk.)
contents note
Mothers of 'the bastard child' -- 'Fathers' of illegitimate children -- Bringing up a child -- Severe poverty -- Civic fathers of the poor -- Concluding reflections.
catalogue key
7129386
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-11-01:
Crawford's investigation into the lives of poor people is a meticulous analysis and evaluation of paternalism in early modern England. Her work is the accumulation of years of teaching, studying, and pondering the policies that crucially affected poor people's lives. The book's strength is the author's ability to navigate the vast body of work done in recent decades on family, sex, children, poor laws, etc. Because of her own work in the archives and her ability to access other archival work, Crawford (d. 2009) is able to bring various ideas and arguments into a coherent vision. She traces, both chronologically and regionally, the development of changing guidelines and procedures in dealing with conjugal and domestic practices of poor women and men in early modern England. The author's ability to show the wide-ranging repercussions of English patriarchy is remarkable. This is an important, useful book for those conducting social history research, especially upper-level undergraduate and graduate students dealing with social issues in the 17th and 18th centuries. Lower-level undergraduates might find the book daunting because the author assumes readers have a certain level of historical understanding. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. Herlihy University of Central Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
As a gender historian and an early modernist, Patricia Crawford has formed part of the backdrop to a generation of undergraduates' learning, pioneering aspects of debate about women's past lives, and acting as a great supporter and mentor of female colleagues globally; this last book of hers might just change the way in which social historians approach their research, which is not a bad place to stop.
"Crawford's book affords an exceptional account of a type of parenting largely unexplored in previous scholarship. Her account of poor parents' efforts to keep their families together despite overwhelming obstacles is a story that challenges many previous assumptions about early modern family life. Additionally, her analysis of civic patriarchy should influence how future scholars view the operations of gender, family, and the nation-state." --Journal of British Studies
Review from other book by this author "an excellent book and highly recommended." --(Parergon 18.2)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of the mothers and fathers of poor children in early modern England, drawing upon a wide range of archival material, including quarter session records, petitions for assistance, applications for places in the London Foundling Hospital, and evidence from criminal trials in London's Old Bailey.
Long Description
Parents of Poor Children is the first sustained study of the mothers and fathers of poor children in the England of the early modern and early industrial period. Although we know a good deal about the family life of monarchs in this period, much less is known about what life was like for poor single mothers, or for ordinary people who were trying to bring up their children. What were poor mothers and fathers trying to achieve, and what support did they have from theirsociety, especially from the welfare system? Patricia Crawford attempts to answer these important questions, in order to illuminate the experience of parenting at this time from the perspective of the poor, a group who have naturally left little in the way of literary testimony. In doing this, she draws upon a wide range of archival material, including quarter session records, petitions for assistance, applications for places in the London Foundling Hospital, and evidence from criminal trials in London's Old Bailey. England in this period had a developing system of welfare, unique in Europe, by which parish rates were collected and administered to those deemed worthy of relief. The 'civic fathers' who administered this welfare drew upon a code of fatherhood framed in the Elizabethan period, by which a patriarch took responsibility for maintaining and exercising authority over wives and children. But, as Patricia Crawford shows, this code of family conduct was the product of a material world completelyalien to that which the poor inhabited. Parents of the poor were different from those of middling and elite status. Poverty, not property, dictated their relationships with their children. Poor families were frequently broken by death. Fathers were frequently absent, and mothers had to rear theirchildren with whatever forms of relief they could find.
Main Description
Parents of Poor Children is the first sustained study of the mothers and fathers of poor children in the England of the early modern and early industrial period. Although we know a good deal about the family life of monarchs in this period, much less is known about what life was like for poorsingle mothers, or for ordinary people who were trying to bring up their children. What were poor mothers and fathers trying to achieve, and what support did they have from their society, especially from the welfare system? Patricia Crawford attempts to answer these important questions, in order to illuminate the experience of parenting at this time from the perspective of the poor, a group who have naturally left little in the way of literary testimony. In doing this, she draws upon a wide range of archival material,including quarter session records, petitions for assistance, applications for places in the London Foundling Hospital, and evidence from criminal trials in London's Old Bailey. England in this period had a developing system of welfare, unique in Europe, by which parish rates were collected and administered to those deemed worthy of relief. The 'civic fathers' who administered this welfare drew upon a code of fatherhood framed in the Elizabethan period, by which a patriarchtook responsibility for maintaining and exercising authority over wives and children. But, as Patricia Crawford shows, this code of family conduct was the product of a material world completely alien to that which the poor inhabited. Parents of the poor were different from those of middling andelite status. Poverty, not property, dictated their relationships with their children. Poor families were frequently broken by death. Fathers were frequently absent, and mothers had to rear their children with whatever forms of relief they could find.
Main Description
Parents of Poor Childrenis the first sustained study of the mothers and fathers of poor children in the England of the early modern and early industrial period. Although we know a good deal about the family life of monarchs in this period, much less is known about what life was like for poor single mothers, or for ordinary people who were trying to bring up their children. What were poor mothers and fathers trying to achieve, and what support did they have from their society, especially from the welfare system? Patricia Crawford attempts to answer these important questions, in order to illuminate the experience of parenting at this time from the perspective of the poor, a group who have naturally left little in the way of literary testimony. In doing this, she draws upon a wide range of archival material, including quarter session records, petitions for assistance, applications for places in the London Foundling Hospital, and evidence from criminal trials in London's Old Bailey. England in this period had a developing system of welfare, unique in Europe, by which parish rates were collected and administered to those deemed worthy of relief. The "civic fathers" who administered this welfare drew upon a code of fatherhood framed in the Elizabethan period, by which a patriarch took responsibility for maintaining and exercising authority over wives and children. But, as Patricia Crawford shows, this code of family conduct was the product of a material world completely alien to that which the poor inhabited. Parents of the poor were different from those of middling and elite status. Poverty, not property, dictated their relationships with their children. Poor families were frequently broken by death. Fathers were frequently absent, and mothers had to rear their children with whatever forms of relief they could find.
Main Description
The first sustained study of the mothers and fathers of poor children in the England of the early modern and early industrial period. Drawing upon a wide range of archival material, including quarter session records, petitions for assistance, applications for places in the London Foundling Hospital, and evidence from criminal trials in London's Old Bailey, the book illuminates the challenges of parenting at this time from the perspective of poor mothers andfathers themselves - a task until now not fully addressed by social historians.
Main Description
This is the first sustained study of the mothers and fathers of poor children in the England of the early modern and early industrial period. Drawing upon a wide range of archival material and a lifetime of research, Professor Crawford illuminates the experience of parenting at this time from the perspective of a group who have left little in the way of literary testimony. The result is a study that reveals just how different the parents of the poor were from those of middling and élite status. Poor families were often broken by death, fathers were frequently absent, and mothers were forced to rear their children with whatever forms of relief they could find. Poverty, not property, dictated their relationships with their children. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. x
Abbreviationsp. xii
Note concerning dates and spellingp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Mothers of 'The Bastard Child'p. 30
'Fathers' of Illegitimate Childrenp. 74
Bringing Up a Childp. 112
Severe Povertyp. 150
Civic Fathers of the Poorp. 193
Concluding Reflectionsp. 240
Notesp. 255
Select Bibliographyp. 319
Indexp. 345
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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