Catalogue


Reconstructing the Roman republic : an ancient political culture and modern research /
Karl-J. Hölkeskamp ; translated by Henry Heitmann-Gordon, revised, updated, and augmented by the author.
imprint
Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, c2010.
description
xiv, 189 p. : ill.
ISBN
0691140383 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780691140384 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, c2010.
isbn
0691140383 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780691140384 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
From 'provocation' to 'discussion' : a plea for continuation -- 'Reality' versus 'system' : conventional conceptualizations of a 'constitution' -- From 'system' to 'structure' : new questions about the social framework of politics -- From 'structures' to 'concepts' : problems of (self-)conceptualization of an alien society -- From 'concepts' to 'political culture' : the benefits of theory -- Between 'aristocracy' and 'democracy' : beyond a dated dichotomy -- Consensus and consent : necessary requirements of a competitive culture -- Symbolic capital as social credit: locating the core of the consensus -- An end of the beginning : a new ancient history and its topicality.
catalogue key
7123817
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Isles Foundation. 2010/12/03.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [141]-179) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This volume is written in an engaging and dynamic style, and makes an original contribution to ongoing debates within the field. There can be no doubt that Hlkeskamp is one of the top scholars working on the Roman Republic. His book represents a summary of the main scholarly questions aired over the last generation or so, as well as a plea for new directions and more dialogue. No equivalent book exists in any language."-- Harriet I. Flower, author of Roman Republics
Flap Copy
"This volume is written in an engaging and dynamic style, and makes an original contribution to ongoing debates within the field. There can be no doubt that Hölkeskamp is one of the top scholars working on the Roman Republic. His book represents a summary of the main scholarly questions aired over the last generation or so, as well as a plea for new directions and more dialogue. No equivalent book exists in any language."--Harriet I. Flower, author ofRoman Republics
Flap Copy
"This volume is written in an engaging and dynamic style, and makes an original contribution to ongoing debates within the field. There can be no doubt that Hölkeskamp is one of the top scholars working on the Roman Republic. His book represents a summary of the main scholarly questions aired over the last generation or so, as well as a plea for new directions and more dialogue. No equivalent book exists in any language."--Harriet I. Flower, author of Roman Republics
Flap Copy
"This volume is written in an engaging and dynamic style, and makes an original contribution to ongoing debates within the field. There can be no doubt that H lkeskamp is one of the top scholars working on the Roman Republic. His book represents a summary of the main scholarly questions aired over the last generation or so, as well as a plea for new directions and more dialogue. No equivalent book exists in any language."--Harriet I. Flower, author of Roman Republics
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-11-01:
In 1984, Fergus Millar of Oxford published an article arguing that the Roman Republic was essentially democratic. That challenged the prevailing orthodoxy, most notably supported by his teacher, the eminent Sir Ronald Syme, who stressed the role of the aristocracy. A spirited international scholarly debate followed. Now, Holkeskamp (Univ. of Cologne, Germany) has summed up an alternative approach, which begins by asserting that the opposition of democracy and aristocracy is "a dated dichotomy." Instead, he offers an analysis of Rome's political culture, showing the relationship between politics and social structure; the use of ceremonies, topography, and traditions to create a collective consensus; and the role of key concepts. The latter follows a distinctively German specialty enshrined in a massive eight-volume lexicon, Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe (1972-1997). Holkeskamp concludes that there was indeed a governing class but that it maintained its dominance through its "social capital," which all classes accepted. The splendid bibliography deserves special note; it meticulously records in 42 pages the important monographs, articles, and primary sources published in the last 100 years. Students at every level will find this brilliant, lucid, carefully organized synthesis of innovative work on the Late Republic to be an invaluable resource. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. I. Frank emeritus, University of California, Irvine
Reviews
Review Quotes
Students at every level will find this brilliant, lucid, carefully organized synthesis of innovative work on the Late Republic to be an invaluable resource. -- Choice
[T]here is a good deal in this book that is useful, sophisticated, and creative.
"[T]here is a good deal in this book that is useful, sophisticated, and creative."-- Benjamin Kelly, Phoenix
This volume is written in an engaging and dynamic style, and makes an original contribution to ongoing debates within the field. There can be no doubt that Hölkeskamp is one of the top scholars working on the Roman Republic. His book represents a summary of the main scholarly questions aired over the last generation or so, as well as a plea for new directions and more dialogue. No equivalent book exists in any language.
"Students at every level will find this brilliant, lucid, carefully organized synthesis of innovative work on the Late Republic to be an invaluable resource."-- Choice
One of Choice s Outstanding Academic Titles for 2010
Students at every level will find this brilliant, lucid, carefully organized synthesis of innovative work on the Late Republic to be an invaluable resource.
"For specialists, much of the ground covered will be familiar, although the author's judgments are often shrewd and his power to summarize wide-ranging and often complex issues is nothing short of magisterial. For nonspecialists, Hlkeskamp's tour d'horizon delivers an accessible and comprehensive introduction to the current state of play in the study of Republican political culture. . . . [A] brief summation cannot do justice to Hlkeskamp's nuanced and wide-ranging survey. The notes and bibliography alone are worth the price of the volume."-- Nathan Rosenstein, Classical World
For specialists, much of the ground covered will be familiar, although the author's judgments are often shrewd and his power to summarize wide-ranging and often complex issues is nothing short of magisterial. For nonspecialists, Hölkeskamp's tour d'horizon delivers an accessible and comprehensive introduction to the current state of play in the study of Republican political culture. . . . [A] brief summation cannot do justice to Hölkeskamp's nuanced and wide-ranging survey. The notes and bibliography alone are worth the price of the volume.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
In recent decades, scholars have argued that the Roman Republic's political culture was essentially democratic in nature, stressing the central role of the 'sovereign' people and their assemblies. Karl-J. Hölkeskamp challenges this view in Reconstructing the Roman Republic, warning that this scholarly trend threatens to become the new orthodoxy, and defending the position that the republic was in fact a uniquely Roman, dominantly oligarchic and aristocratic political form. Hölkeskamp offers a comprehensive, in-depth survey of the modern debate surrounding the Roman Republic. He looks at the ongoing controversy first triggered in the 1980s when the 'oligarchic orthodoxy' was called into question by the idea that the republic's political culture was a form of Greek-style democracy, and he considers the important theoretical and methodological advances of the 1960s and 1970s that prepared the ground for this debate. Hölkeskamp renews and refines the 'elitist' view, showing how the republic was a unique kind of premodern city-state political culture shaped by a specific variant of a political class. He covers a host of fascinating topics, including the Roman value system; the senatorial aristocracy; competition in war and politics within this aristocracy; and the symbolic language of public rituals and ceremonies, monuments, architecture, and urban topography. Certain to inspire continued debate, Reconstructing the Roman Republic offers fresh approaches to the study of the republic while attesting to the field's enduring vitality.
Main Description
In recent decades, scholars have argued that the Roman Republic's political culture was essentially democratic in nature, stressing the central role of the 'sovereign' people and their assemblies. Karl-J. Hölkeskamp challenges this view in Reconstructing the Roman Republic , warning that this scholarly trend threatens to become the new orthodoxy, and defending the position that the republic was in fact a uniquely Roman, dominantly oligarchic and aristocratic political form. Hölkeskamp offers a comprehensive, in-depth survey of the modern debate surrounding the Roman Republic. He looks at the ongoing controversy first triggered in the 1980s when the 'oligarchic orthodoxy' was called into question by the idea that the republic's political culture was a form of Greek-style democracy, and he considers the important theoretical and methodological advances of the 1960s and 1970s that prepared the ground for this debate. Hölkeskamp renews and refines the 'elitist' view, showing how the republic was a unique kind of premodern city-state political culture shaped by a specific variant of a political class. He covers a host of fascinating topics, including the Roman value system; the senatorial aristocracy; competition in war and politics within this aristocracy; and the symbolic language of public rituals and ceremonies, monuments, architecture, and urban topography. Certain to inspire continued debate, Reconstructing the Roman Republic offers fresh approaches to the study of the republic while attesting to the field's enduring vitality.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work combines a survey of modern research on the Roman Republic from the 1960s onwards with a modern integrative introduction into theories and models, concepts and categories that serve to describe, analyse and explain the Roman Republic as a specific sort of a pre-modern city state-based 'political culture'.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
Preface to the English Editionp. ix
Preface to the German Editionp. xiii
From 'Provocation' to 'Discussion': A Plea for Continuationp. 1
'Reality' versus 'System': Conventional Conceptualizations of a 'Constitution'p. 12
From 'System' to 'Structure': New Questions about the Social Framework of Politicsp. 23
From 'Structures' to 'Concepts': Problems of (Self-) Conceptualization of an Alien Societyp. 44
From 'Concepts' to 'Political Culture': The Benefits of Theoryp. 53
Between 'Aristocracy' and 'Democracy': Beyond a Dated Dichotomyp. 76
Consensus and Consent: Necessary Requirements of a Competitive Culturep. 98
Symbolic Capital as Social Credit: Locating the Core of the Consensusp. 107
An End of the Beginning: A New Ancient History and Its Topicalityp. 125
Abbreviationsp. 137
Bibliographyp. 141
Index of Namesp. 181
Index of Subjectsp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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