Catalogue


Pride in modesty : modernist architecture and the vernacular tradition in Italy /
Michelangelo Sabatino.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2010.
description
xxvi, 341 p. : ill.
ISBN
9780802097057 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2010.
isbn
9780802097057 :
local note
Signed by the author.
catalogue key
7123704
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Pride in Modestybrings a valuable new perspective to the scholarship on Italian modernism. Sabatino unquestionably establishes the vernacular as a major feature of Italian modernism and invites scholars to reconsider the topography of inter-war and post-war Italian architecture, which has far too long been defined by a narrow cannon of exemplars.'
'Pride in Modestyis admirably deft in its handling of the genealogy and appropriation of the vernacular in Italian modernist architecture. Michelangelo Sabatino's study holds an important place in the scholarship of Italian modernism (and modernism in general) because it shifts the focus away from international modernist influences and explores in depth the search for autochthonous roots in the creation of new architectural forms.'
'Sabatino's richly detailed and contextualized history of the vernacular documents a whole other legacy of architectural practice and nationalist ideology in twentieth-century Italy. This revelatory book challenges the dominant assumptions that building under fascism was restricted to competing styles of rhetorical romanità, modernist classicism, and rationalism. It also demonstrates that the vernacular was not homogeneous, but as diverse as the regions of Italy. Through a close reading of literature, ethnography, and architecture, Sabatino shows that these varying interpretations of indigenous dwellings and craft traditions worked toward and against the nation's drive to modernity.'
'Michelangelo Sabatino follows the deep engagement of Italian architects with the vernacular buildings of their country from the 1910s to the 1970s, through both fascism and the boom of the fifties. He shows how the vernacular helped Italian modernist architects to battle academicism, to both engage and resist fascism, to negotiate the transition to postwar democracy, and more generally to address the profound transformations of Italy at that time. In short, Sabatino has identified a key mediating structure between architecture and society for Italy in those years.'
'Pride in Modesty brings a valuable new perspective to the scholarship on Italian modernism. Sabatino unquestionably establishes the vernacular as a major feature of Italian modernism and invites scholars to reconsider the topography of inter-war and post-war Italian architecture, which has far too long been defined by a narrow cannon of exemplars.'
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Summaries
Main Description
Following Italy's unification in 1861, architects, artists, politicians, and literati engaged in volatile debates over the pursuit of national and regional identity. Growing industrialization and urbanization across the country contrasted with the rediscovery of traditionally built forms and objects created by the agrarian peasantry. Pride in Modesty argues that these ordinary, often anonymous, everyday things inspired and transformed Italian art and architecture from the 1920s through the 1970s.Through in-depth examinations of texts, drawings, and buildings, Michelangelo Sabatino finds that the folk traditions of the pre-industrial countryside have provided formal, practical, and poetic inspiration directly affecting both design and construction practices over a period of sixty years and a number of different political regimes. This surprising continuity allows Sabatino to reject the division of Italian history into sharply delimited periods such as Fascist Interwar and Democratic Postwar and to instead emphasize the long, continuous process that transformed pastoral and urban ideals into a new, modernist Italy.
Main Description
Following Italy's unification in 1861, architects, artists, politicians, and literati engaged in volatile debates over the pursuit of national and regional identity. Growing industrialization and urbanization across the country contrasted with the rediscovery of traditionally built forms and objects created by the agrarian peasantry. Pride in Modestyargues that these ordinary, often anonymous, everyday things inspired and transformed Italian art and architecture from the 1920s through the 1970s. Through in-depth examinations of texts, drawings, and buildings, Michelangelo Sabatino finds that the folk traditions of the pre-industrial countryside have provided formal, practical, and poetic inspiration directly affecting both design and construction practices over a period of sixty years and a number of different political regimes. This surprising continuity allows Sabatino to reject the division of Italian history into sharply delimited periods such as Fascist Interwar and Democratic Postwar and to instead emphasize the long, continuous process that transformed pastoral and urban ideals into a new, modernist Italy.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
Foreword: The Extraordinary Role of Ordinary Thingsp. xiii
Ringraziamenti/Acknowledgmentsp. xxiii
Introductionp. 3
In Search of Italianità: Ethnography and National Identityp. 25
The Picturesque Revival: Rusticity and Contextualismp. 57
Tabula rasa and Tradition: Futurism and Rationalism between Primitivism and Mediterraneitàp. 92
Engineering versus Architecture: The Vernacular between New Objectivity and Lyricismp. 128
Continuity and Reality: The Vernacular Resumed in Postwar Architecture and Urbanismp. 165
Epiloguep. 196
Notesp. 211
Selected Bibliographyp. 281
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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