Catalogue


Seminole voices : reflections on their changing society, 1970-2000 /
Julian M. Pleasants and Harry A. Kersey, Jr.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2010.
description
xxi, 234 p.
ISBN
0803229860 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780803229860 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2010.
isbn
0803229860 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780803229860 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Economic change -- Seminole education -- Transformations in religion and medicine -- Housing and family transitions in social context -- Dilemmas of language and culture.
catalogue key
7123332
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-11-01:
Emeritus professors Pleasants (Univ. of Florida) and Kersey (Florida Atlantic Univ.) offer an ethnohistorical look at the Seminole Nation after the introduction of gaming. The authors clearly tell their story through excerpted interviews from the Native Americans Oral History Collections, part of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Project at the University of Florida. The book reads like a traditional academic and conservative rendering of an evolving Seminole Nation that appears, according to the authors, to struggle with issues of identity and political, social, cultural, and language changes, seemingly attributed to the influx of gaming revenue and government aid. In some ways, the book resembles an ethnohistorical-anthropological study of the early 20th century rather than a discussion about people at the opening of the 21st century. Chapters are approximately 38 pages long; brief introduction and conclusion chapters highlight a culture in the midst of change. This reviewer had hoped to hear more of the current and last generations' articulation of the struggles of being Indian in the 21st century. Instead, readers are party to a conversation between two previous generations about a Native group struggling with the effects of Western society's desire to convert and save the Indian. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. K. J. White SUNY Oswego
Reviews
Review Quotes
" Seminole Voices shows that Florida''s Seminoles experiences dramatic changes between 1970 and 2000. . . . The authors deserve special commendation for making these voices available to tribal members and general readers."Jane F. Lancaster, Journal of Southern History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In a series of interviews conducted from 1969 to 1971 and again from 1998 to 1999, more than two hundred members of the Florida Seminole community described their lives for the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. Some of those interviews, now showcased in this volume, shed light on how the Seminoles' society, culture, religion, government, health care, and economy had changed during a tumultuous period in Florida's history. In 1970 the Seminoles lived in relative poverty, dependent on the Bureau of Indian Affairs, tourist trade, cattle breeding, handicrafts, and truck farming. By 2006 they were operating six casinos, and in 2007 they purchased Hard Rock International for $965 million. Within one generation, the tribe moved from poverty and relative obscurity to entrepreneurial success and wealth. S eminole Voices relates how economic changes have affected everyday life and values. The Seminoles' frank opinions and fascinating stories offer a window into the world of a modern Native community as well as a useful barometer of changes affecting its members at the beginning of the twenty-first century.
Main Description
In a series of interviews conducted from 1969 to 1971 and again from 1998 to 1999, more than two hundred members of the Florida Seminole community described their lives for the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. Some of those interviews, now showcased in this volume, shed light on how the Seminoles' society, culture, religion, government, health care, and economy had changed during a tumultuous period in Florida's history. In 1970 the Seminoles lived in relative poverty, dependent on the Bureau of Indian Affairs, tourist trade, cattle breeding, handicrafts, and truck farming. By 2006 they were operating six casinos, and in 2007 they purchased Hard Rock International for $965 million. Within one generation, the tribe moved from poverty and relative obscurity to entrepreneurial success and wealth. Seminole Voices relates how economic changes have affected everyday life and values. The Seminoles' frank opinions and fascinating stories offer a window into the world of a modern Native community as well as a useful barometer of changes affecting its members at the beginning of the twenty-first century.
Main Description
In a series of interviews conducted from 1969 to 1971 and again from 1998 to 1999, more than two hundred members of the Florida Seminole community described their lives for the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. Some of those interviews, now showcased in this volume, shed light on how the Seminoles' society, culture, religion, government, health care, and economy had changed during a tumultuous period in Florida's history. In 1970 the Seminoles lived in relative poverty, dependent on the Bureau of Indian Affairs, tourist trade, cattle breeding, handicrafts, and truck farming. By 2006 they were operating six casinos, and in 2007 they purchased Hard Rock International for $965 million. Within one generation, the tribe moved from poverty and relative obscurity to entrepreneurial success and wealth. Seminole Voicesrelates how economic changes have affected everyday life and values. The Seminoles' frank opinions and fascinating stories offer a window into the world of a modern Native community as well as a useful barometer of changes affecting its members at the beginning of the twenty-first century.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Series Prefacep. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Economic Changep. 15
Seminole Educationp. 66
Transformations in Religion and Medicinep. 101
Housing and Family Transitions in Social Contextp. 141
Dilemmas of Language and Culturep. 166
Conclusionp. 201
Notesp. 211
Bibliographyp. 223
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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