Catalogue


Reflections of empire : archaeological and ethnographic studies on the pottery of the Ottoman Levant /
edited by Bethany J. Walker.
imprint
Boston, MA : American Schools of Oriental Research, c2009.
description
xii, 163 p.
ISBN
0897570812 (alk. paper), 9780897570817 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Boston, MA : American Schools of Oriental Research, c2009.
isbn
0897570812 (alk. paper)
9780897570817 (alk. paper)
contents note
Defining the Levant / Bethany J. Walker -- Ottoman pottery assemblages from excavations in Israel / Miriam Avissar -- The Ottoman pottery of Palestine / Marwan Abu Khalaf -- An ethno-archaeological approach to Ottoman pottery : the case of "Gaza gray ware" / Hamed Salem -- Identifying the late Islamic period ceramically : preliminary observations on Ottoman wares from central and northern Jordan / Bethany J. Walker -- Stability and change in Ottoman coarse wares in Cyprus / Ruth Smadar Gabrieli.
catalogue key
7120390
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
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Summaries
Long Description
Ottoman archaeology has progressed significantly in the last ten years from a study of the "Dark Ages" to a multi-faceted investigation into the history and societies of the longest-lived Muslim empire of the Early Modern era. What have been missing from the scholarship of the period, however, are the nuts and bolts of Ottoman ceramics from a regional perspective: technical studies that identify and define assemblages and produce typologies and chronologies of specific wares that go beyond the site-specific studies dominant in current scholarship. This monograph addresses this gap in the literature by pulling together technical studies on pottery from the eastern frontiers of the Ottoman Empire: Cyprus, Israel, the Palestinian territories, and Jordan. The geographical focus of the book recognizes the cultural, historical, and economic interconnections that made this region a distinctive orbit in the Ottoman sphere and that represent both the commonalities and diversities among the provinces that constituted the "Middle East" of the Ottoman world. The monograph presents previously unpublished Ottoman pottery from largely archaeological (and specifically stratified) contexts and assesses their potential for understanding the larger cultural history of the Ottoman's eastern frontier. The individual authors are leading ceramics specialists in the region and have each worked on multiple projects in different countries. Rather than merely a collection of individual studies, the monograph is comparative and synthesizes our current knowledge of Ottoman ceramics in a way that is useful technically to field archaeologists and on a theoretical level to scholars of Ottoman social history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This monograph presents previously unpublished Ottoman pottery from largely archaeological (and specifically stratified) contexts and assesses their potential for understanding the larger cultural history of the Ottoman's eastern frontier.
Long Description
Ottoman archaeology in the last decade has progressed from the study of a "Dark Age" to the multi-faceted investigation of the history and societies of the longest-lived Muslim empire of the early modern era. Missing from this investigation, however, have been technical studies of Ottoman-period ceramics-studies that identify assemblages, define typologies, and posit chronologies for specific wares across entire regions. This volume assembles such technical studies for the region of the Ottoman Levant: Cyprus, Israel, Palestine, and Jordan. This geographical focus recognizes the cultural, historical, and economic interconnections that made the Levant a distinctive part of the Ottoman empire. These studies present previously unpublished corpora of Ottoman pottery from largely archaeological, and specifically stratified, contexts. The individual authors are leading ceramics specialists in their respective areas. Rather than merely a collection of unrelated studies, however, this volume attempts to synthesize current knowledge of Ottoman ceramics in a manner that is both technically useful to field archaeologists and theoretically suggestive to scholars of Ottoman social history.

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