Catalogue


Britain, Ireland and the Second World War /
Ian S. Wood.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
description
ix, 238 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0748623272 (hbk.), 9780748623273 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
series title
series title
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
isbn
0748623272 (hbk.)
9780748623273 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7119388
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ian S. Wood has previously been a lecturer in History at Napier University, Edinburgh and also taught part-time for the Open University. For many years he has been a regular contributor to the press on the conflict in Northern Ireland. His most recent book was Crimes of Loyalty: A History of the UDA (Edinburgh University press, 2006) and he is the author of two studies of Winston Churchill and a biography of the Scottish Socialist John Wheatley. He has also written Ireland During the Second World War (2002) and God, Guns and Ulster (2003).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-03-01:
The controversial decision of the de Valera government to keep Ireland neutral during WW II and its aftermath (the period 1939-45, officially referred to as the "Emergency") has attracted attention from scholars such as Brian Girvin (The Emergency: Neutral Ireland 1939-45, 2006), Clair Wills (That Neutral Island: A Cultural History of Ireland during the Second World War, 2007), and Eunan O'Halpin (Spying on Ireland, 2008). Wood (formerly, Napier Univ. and Open Univ., UK), who has previously published on this topic and on Churchill (e.g., Ireland during the Second World War, 2002), contributes a useful synthesis of the subject to the series "Societies at War." Drawing on secondary sources, newspapers, and archival records, he establishes the roots of the policy and the tensions it sparked with the British and US governments. He covers political, military, social, and economic developments in Eire and Northern Ireland, including the activities of the IRA and the roles of Irish workers in Britain and in the British armed forces. Wood also considers the moral ambiguities of neutrality, such as de Valera's expression of condolences to the German minister in Dublin on Hitler's death and the muted reaction of the Irish in 1945 to reports of Nazi concentration camps. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. H. Plunkett Piedmont Virginia Community College
Reviews
Review Quotes
Britain, Ireland, and the Second World War provides a valuable survey of the impact that the war had on Ireland and how it affected relations among the governments of Eire, Northern Ireland, and Great Britain.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2011
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Societies at War seriesIreland, Britain and the Second World WarIan S. WoodFor Britain the Second World War exists in popular memory as a time of heroic sacrifice, survival and ultimate victory over Fascism. In the Irish state the years 1939-1945 are still remembered simply as 'the Emergency'. Eire was one of many small states which in 1939 chose not to stay out of the war but one of the few able to maintain its non-belligerency as a policy.How much this owed to Britain's military resolve or to the political skills of Éamon de Valera is a key question which this new book will explore. It will also examine the tensions Eire's policy created in its relations with Winston Churchill and with the United States. The author also explores propaganda, censorship and Irish state security and the degree to which it involves secret co-operation with Britain. Disturbing issues are also raised like the IRA's relationship to Nazi Germany and ambivalent Irish attitudes to the Holocaust.Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems on Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.Ian S. Wood has previously been a lecturer in History at Napier University, Edinburgh and also taught part-time for the Open University. For many years he has been a regular contributor to the press on the conflict in Northern Ireland. His most recent book was Crimes of Loyalty: A History of the UDA (EUP, 2006) and he is the author of two studies of Winston Churchill and a biography of the Scottish Socialist John Wheatley. He has also authored Ireland During the Second World War (2002) and God, Guns and Ulster (2003).
Back Cover Copy
Societies at War seriesIreland, Britain and the Second World WarIan S. WoodFor Britain the Second World War exists in popular memory as a time of heroic sacrifice, survival and ultimate victory over Fascism. In the Irish state the years 1939-45 are still remembered simply as 'the Emergency'. Eire was one of many small states which in 1939 chose not to stay out of the war but one of the few able to maintain its non-belligerency as a policy.How much this owed to Britain's military resolve or to the political skills of Éamon de Valera is a key question which this new book will explore. It will also examine the tensions Eire's policy created in its relations with Winston Churchill and with the United States. The author also explores propaganda, censorship and Irish state security and the degree to which it involves secret co-operation with Britain. Disturbing issues are also raised like the IRA's relationship to Nazi Germany and ambivalent Irish attitudes to the Holocaust.Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems on Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.Ian S. Wood has previously been a lecturer in History at Napier University, Edinburgh and also taught part-time for the Open University. For many years he has been a regular contributor to the press on the conflict in Northern Ireland. His most recent book was Crimes of Loyalty: A History of the UDA (EUP, 2006) and he is the author of two studies of Winston Churchill and a biography of the Scottish Socialist John Wheatley. He has also authored Ireland During the Second World War (2002) and God, Guns and Ulster (2003).
Back Cover Copy
Societies at War seriesIreland, Britain and the Second World WarIan S. WoodFor Britain the Second World War exists in popular memory as a time of heroic sacrifice, survival and ultimate victory over Fascism. In the Irish state the years 1939-45 are still remembered simply as 'the Emergency'. Eire was one of many small states which in 1939 chose not to stay out of the war but one of the few able to maintain its non-belligerency as a policy.How much this owed to Britain's military resolve or to the political skills of iamon de Valera is a key question which this new book will explore. It will also examine the tensions Eire's policy created in its relations with Winston Churchill and with the United States. The author also explores propaganda, censorship and Irish state security and the degree to which it involves secret co-operation with Britain. Disturbing issues are also raised like the IRA's relationship to Nazi Germany and ambivalent Irish attitudes to the Holocaust.Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems on Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.Ian S. Wood has previously been a lecturer in History at Napier University, Edinburgh and also taught part-time for the Open University. For many years he has been a regular contributor to the press on the conflict in Northern Ireland. His most recent book was Crimes of Loyalty: A History of the UDA (EUP, 2006) and he is the author of two studies of Winston Churchill and a biography of the Scottish Socialist John Wheatley. He has also authored Ireland During the Second World War (2002) and God, Guns and Ulster (2003).
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the Irish border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems in Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.
Description for Reader
For Britain the Second World War exists in popular memory as a time of heroic sacrifice, survival and ultimate victory over Fascism. In the Irish state the years 1939-1945 are still remembered simply as 'the Emergency'. Eire was one of many small states which in 1939 chose not to stay out of the war but one of the few able to maintain its non-belligerency as a policy. How much this owed to Britain's military resolve or to the political skills of Éamon de Valera is a key question which this new book will explore. It will also examine the tensions Eire's policy created in its relations with Winston Churchill and with the United States. The author also explores propaganda, censorship and Irish state security and the degree to which it involves secret co-operation with Britain. Disturbing issues are also raised like the IRA's relationship to Nazi Germany and ambivalent Irish attitudes to the Holocaust. Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems in Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.
Description for Teachers/Educators
Modern British, Irish and European history and war studies courses.
Main Description
For Britain the Second World War exists in popular memory as a time of heroic sacrifice, survival and ultimate victory over Fascism. In the Irish state the years 1939-1945 are still remembered simply as 'the Emergency'. Eire was one of many small states which in 1939 chose not to stay out of the war but one of the few able to maintain its non-belligerency as a policy. How much this owed to Britain's military resolve or to the political skills of amon de Valera is a key question which this new book will explore. It will also examine the tensions Eire's policy created in its relations with Winston Churchill and with the United States. The author also explores propaganda, censorship and Irish state security and the degree to which it involves secret co-operation with Britain. Disturbing issues are also raised like the IRA's relationship to Nazi Germany and ambivalent Irish attitudes to the Holocaust. Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems in Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.
Main Description
For Britain the Second World War exists in popular memory as a time of heroic sacrifice, survival and ultimate victory over Fascism. In the Irish state the years 1939-1945 are still remembered simply as 'the Emergency'. Eire was one of many small states which in 1939 chose not to stay out of the war but one of the few able to maintain its non-belligerency as a policy.How much this owed to Britain's military resolve or to the political skills of Éamon de Valera is a key question which this new book will explore. It will also examine the tensions Eire's policy created in its relations with Winston Churchill and with the United States. The author also explores propaganda, censorship and Irish state security and the degree to which it involves secret co-operation with Britain. Disturbing issues are also raised like the IRA's relationship to Nazi Germany and ambivalent Irish attitudes to the Holocaust.Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems on Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.
Main Description
For Britain the Second World War exists in popular memory as a time of heroic sacrifice, survival and ultimate victory over Fascism. In the Irish state the years 1939-1945 are still remembered simply as 'the Emergency'. Eire was one of many small states which in 1939 chose not to stay out of the war but one of the few able to maintain its non-belligerency as a policy.How much this owed to Britain's military resolve or to the political skills of iamon de Valera is a key question which this new book will explore. It will also examine the tensions Eire's policy created in its relations with Winston Churchill and with the United States. The author also explores propaganda, censorship and Irish state security and the degree to which it involves secret co-operation with Britain. Disturbing issues are also raised like the IRA's relationship to Nazi Germany and ambivalent Irish attitudes to the Holocaust.Drawing upon both published and unpublished sources, this book illustrates the war's impact on people on both sides of the border and shows how it failed to resolve sectarian problems on Northern Ireland while raising higher the barriers of misunderstanding between it and the Irish state across its border.
Main Description
Written by an renowned expert on World War II, Britain, Ireland, and the Second World War synthesizes published research and information from newly recovered primary sources. The book follow a thematic rather than a chronological approach, illustrating particular areas of Britain's wartime relationship with the Irish state, as well as closely related issues such as the role of Northern Ireland and the IRA.
Main Description
Written by an renowned expert on World War II, Britain, Ireland, and the Second World Warsynthesizes published research and information from newly recovered primary sources. The book follow a thematic rather than a chronological approach, illustrating particular areas of Britain's wartime relationship with the Irish state, as well as closely related issues such as the role of Northern Ireland and the IRA.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
The Origins of Éire's Neutralityp. 1
Éire's Emergency, Britain's Warp. 22
Éire: Crisis and Survivalp. 48
Security, Censorship and Propagandap. 67
Fanatic Hearts: the IRA, 1939-45p. 101
Éire in the Emergency and the Irish in Britainp. 141
Northern Ireland at Warp. 171
Emergency, War and their Aftermathp. 196
Bibliographyp. 219
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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