Catalogue


Royalists and royalism during the interregnum /
edited by Jason McElligott and David L. Smith.
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2010.
description
viii, 267 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0719081610 (hbk.), 9780719081613 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2010.
isbn
0719081610 (hbk.)
9780719081613 (hbk.)
general note
Second collection of essays from an international conference entitled "Royalists and royalism: politics, religion, and culture, 1640-60," July, 2004.
catalogue key
7119187
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jason McElligott works for the Trinity Long Room Hub, the Arts and Humanities research institute at Trinity College Dublin David L. Smith is Fellow and Director of Studies in History at Selwyn College, Cambridge
Summaries
Main Description
What was it like to live under the English Republic and, later, Cromwell's Protectorate, if one supported the defeated Stuarts and yearned for the day when Charles II would once again set foot in England? This book tells the story of the traumatic decade of the 1650s (or, 'the Interregnum', from the Latin meaning 'between the reign of the kings') from the vantage point of those who lost the Civil Wars. It describes how these men and women negotiated the difficult choices they faced: to compromise, collaborate, or resist.It brings together essays by established and emerging historians and literary scholars in Britain, Europe, the United States and Australia. The essays sketch the difficulties, complexities, and nuances of the Royalist experience during the Commonwealth and Protectorate, looking at women, religion, print-culture, literature, the politics of exile, and the nature and extent of royalist networks in England.
Main Description
What was it like to live under the English Republic and, later, Cromwell#146;s Protectorate, if one supported the defeated Stuarts and yearned for the day when Charles II would once again set foot in England? This book tells the story of the traumatic decade of the 1650s (or, #145;the Interregnum#146;, from the Latin meaning #145;between the reign of the kings#146;) from the vantage point of those who lost the Civil Wars. It describes how these men and women negotiated the difficult choices they faced: to compromise, collaborate, or resist. It brings together essays by established and emerging historians and literary scholars in Britain, Europe, the United States and Australia. The essays sketch the difficulties, complexities, and nuances of the Royalist experience during the Commonwealth and Protectorate, looking at women, religion, print-culture, literature, the politics of exile, and the nature and extent of royalist networks in England.
Main Description
There has long been an unfortunate tendency to dismiss those who were loyal to the Stuarts as, in the immortal words of 1066 and all that, ‘wrong but romantic’, or as the products of unthinking political and religious reaction. Until we know far more about those men and women from all levels of society who supported the king, we can never hope to unlock the essential characteristics of the conflict which engulfed Britain during the 1640s and 1650s.In recent years, scholars have begun to explore the phenomenon of royalism during the 1640s. Yet, we still know next to nothing about those who were loyal to Charles II during the 1650s. This volume brings together essays by established and emerging historians and literary scholars in Britain, Europe, the United States and Australia, sketching the difficulties, complexities, and nuances of the Royalist experience during the Commonwealth and Protectorate. It examines women, religion, print culture, literature, the politics of exile, and the nature and extent of royalist networks in England.This ambitious and innovative book sheds important new light on the experience of those who were loyal to the Stuarts. It argues for the need to re-orientate, re-invigorate, and re-invent the study of those who detested Cromwell and his ‘rebels’; and it forces us to examine the decade as a whole from a new perspective. It will be essential reading for anyone interested in the culture, history or literature of the English Revolution.
Main Description
There has long been an unfortunate tendency to dismiss those who were loyal to the Stuarts as, in the immortal words of 1066 and All That, 'wrong but romantic', or as the products of unthinking political and religious reaction. In recent years, scholars have begun to explore the phenomenon of royalism during the 1640s. Yet we still know very little about those who were loyal to Charles II during the 1650s. This volume brings together essays by established and emerging historians and literary scholars in Britain, Europe, the United States and Australia, sketching the difficulties, complexities, and nuances of the Royalist experience during the Commonwealth and Protectorate. It examines women, religion, printculture, literature, the politics of exile, and the nature and extent of royalist networks in England. This ambitious and innovative book sheds important new light on the experience of those who were loyal to the Stuarts. It argues for the need to re-orientate, re-invigorate and re-invent the study of those who detested Cromwell and his 'rebels'; and it forces us to examine the decade as a whole from a new perspective. It will be essential reading for anyone interested in the culture, history or literature of the English Revolution. Book jacket.
Main Description
There has long been an unfortunate tendency to dismiss those who were loyal to the Stuarts as, in the immortal words of 1066 and all that, #145;wrong but romantic#146;, or as the products of unthinking political and religious reaction. Until we know far more about those men and women from all levels of society who supported the king, we can never hope to unlock the essential characteristics of the conflict which engulfed Britain during the 1640s and 1650s.In recent years, scholars have begun to explore the phenomenon of royalism during the 1640s. Yet, we still know next to nothing about those who were loyal to Charles II during the 1650s. This volume brings together essays by established and emerging historians and literary scholars in Britain, Europe, the United States and Australia, sketching the difficulties, complexities, and nuances of the Royalist experience during the Commonwealth and Protectorate. It examines women, religion, print culture, literature, the politics of exile, and the nature and extent of royalist networks in England.This ambitious and innovative book sheds important new light on the experience of those who were loyal to the Stuarts. It argues for the need to re-orientate, re-invigorate, and re-invent the study of those who detested Cromwell and his #145;rebels#146;; and it forces us to examine the decade as a whole from a new perspective. It will be essential reading for anyone interested in the culture, history or literature of the English Revolution.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title tells the story of the traumatic decade of the 1650s from the vantage point of those who lost the Civil Wars. It describes how these men and women negotiated the difficult choices they faced: to compromise, collaborate or resist.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Notes on Contributorsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. x
Introduction: Rethinking Royalists and royalism during the Interregnump. 1
Episcopalian conformity and nonconformity, 1646-60p. 18
Seditious speech and popular royalism, 1649-60p. 44
Artful ambivalence? Picturing Charles I during the Interregnump. 67
'Vailing his Crown': Royalist criticism of Charles I's kingship in the 1650sp. 88
Royalists in exile: the experience of Daniel O'Neillp. 106
Gender, geography and exile: Royalists and the Low Countries in the 1650sp. 128
Dramatis Personae: royalism, theatre and the political ontology of the person in post-Regicide writingp. 149
Shakespeare for Royalists: John Quarles and The Rape of Lucrece (1655)p. 171
'The honour of this Nation': William Dugdale and the History of St Paul's (1658)p. 194
Atlantic royalism? Polemic, censorship and the 'Declaration and Protestation of the Governour and Inhabitants of Virginia'p. 214
The Earl of Southampton and the lessons of Interregnum financep. 235
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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