Catalogue


Imagining an English reading public, 1150-1400 /
Katharine Breen.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
x, 287 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780521199223
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
9780521199223
contents note
The fourteenth-century crisis of habit -- Medieval theories of habitus -- The grammatical paradigm -- A crusading habitus -- Piers Plowman and the formation of an English literary habitus.
abstract
"I call "vernacular language" that which infants become accustomed to from those around them when they first begin to distinguish sounds; or, to put it more briefly, I declare that vernacular language is what we take in without learning any rules, by imitating our nurses. There is also another kind of language"--Provided by publisher.
"This original study explores the importance of the concept of habitus - that is, the set of acquired patterns of thought, behaviour and taste that result from internalising culture or objective social structures - in the medieval imagination. Beginning by examining medieval theories of habitus in a general sense, Katharine Breen goes on to investigate the relationships between habitus, language, and Christian virtue. While most medieval pedagogical theorists regarded the habitus of Latin grammar as the gateway to a generalized habitus of virtue, reformers increasingly experimented with vernacular languages that could fulfill the same function. These new vernacular habits, Breen argues, laid the conceptual foundations for an English reading public. Ranging across texts in Latin and several vernaculars, and including a case study of Piers Plowman, this interdisciplinary study will appeal to readers interested in medieval literature, religion and art history, in addition to those interested in the sociological concept of habitus"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7116993
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A thoughtful interdisciplinary study, Breen's work constitutes a valuable addition to the field of vernacular studies in the Middle Ages.' Mary C. Flannery, Times Literary Supplement
"The pieces of her puzzle, when assembled, produce an innovative and compelling literary history that will surely influence any scholar working on medieval vernacular writers." -Denise L. Despres,The University of Puget Sound
'Katherine Breen's book presents a bold and provocative re-envisioning of what it meant to write in the vernacular in late medieval England. This study thus encourages us to re-imagine what lay behind the great flourishing of vernacular literary culture in the late fourteenth century. …[The book] presents complex ideas clearly, and I found it to be well argued. I am confident that it will offer a significant contribution to our understanding of late medieval English literary culture and the place of the vernacular therein. Breen's book raises more questions than it answers - the sign of a provocative study, for sure. … It is a testament to this stimulating study that, by exploring the issue of vernacularity within the discourse of habitus, Breen has framed a question that can be explored in many new and potentially invigorating directions.' Medium Aevum
"...an excellent book. Deeply considered and extensively researched, it illuminates Piers Plowman and Chaucer's Treatise in new ways by locating them within a complex understanding of the use of the vernacular in late fourteenth-century England." >-Stephanie Hollis, Parergon - Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Examining the concept of habitus - acquired patterns of thought, behaviour and taste that result from internalizing culture or objective social structures - Katharine Breen argues that the adaptation of elite, clerical forms of habitus for lay audiences established the conceptual foundations for a reading public in medieval England.
Main Description
This original study explores the importance of the concept of habitus - that is, the set of acquired patterns of thought, behavior and taste that result from internalizing culture or objective social structures - in the medieval imagination. Beginning by examining medieval theories of habitus in a general sense, Katharine Breen goes on to investigate the relationships between habitus, language, and Christian virtue. While most medieval pedagogical theorists regarded the habitus of Latin grammar as the gateway to a generalized habitus of virtue, reformers increasingly experimented with vernacular languages that could fulfill the same function. These new vernacular habits, Breen argues, laid the conceptual foundations for an English reading public. Ranging across texts in Latin and several vernaculars, and including a case study of Piers Plowman, this interdisciplinary study will appeal to readers interested in medieval literature, religion and art history, in addition to those interested in the sociological concept of habitus.
Main Description
This original study explores the importance of the concept of habitus - that is, the set of acquired patterns of thought, behaviour and taste that result from internalizing culture or objective social structures - in the medieval imagination. Beginning by examining medieval theories of habitus in a general sense, Katharine Breen goes on to investigate the relationships between habitus, language and Christian virtue. While most medieval pedagogical theorists regarded the habitus of Latin grammar as the gateway to a generalized habitus of virtue, reformers increasingly experimented with vernacular languages that could fulfill the same function. These new vernacular habits, Breen argues, laid the conceptual foundations for an English reading public. Ranging across texts in Latin and several vernaculars, and including a case study of Piers Plowman, this interdisciplinary study will appeal to readers interested in medieval literature, religion and art history, in addition to those interested in the sociological concept of habitus.
Main Description
This original study explores the importance of the concept of habitus - that is, the set of acquired patterns of thought, behaviour and taste that result from internalising culture or objective social structures - in the medieval imagination. Beginning by examining medieval theories of habitus in a general sense, Katharine Breen goes on to investigate the relationships between habitus, language, and Christian virtue. While most medieval pedagogical theorists regarded the habitus of Latin grammar as the gateway to a generalized habitus of virtue, reformers increasingly experimented with vernacular languages that could fulfill the same function. These new vernacular habits, Breen argues, laid the conceptual foundations for an English reading public. Ranging across texts in Latin and several vernaculars, and including a case study of Piers Plowman, this interdisciplinary study will appeal to readers interested in medieval literature, religion and art history, in addition to those interested in the sociological concept of habitus.
Description for Bookstore
Examining the concept of habitus - acquired patterns of thought, behaviour and taste that result from internalising culture or objective social structures - Katharine Breen argues that the adaptation of elite, clerical forms of habitus for lay audiences established the conceptual foundations for a reading public in medieval England.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The fourteenth-century crisis of habitp. 16
Medieval theories of habitusp. 43
The grammatical paradigmp. 80
A Crusading habitusp. 122
Piers Plowman and the formation of an English literary habitusp. 172
Epilogue: the King's Englishp. 222
Notesp. 229
Bibliographyp. 261
Indexp. 282
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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