Catalogue


Maimonides, Spinoza and us : toward an intellectually vibrant Judaism /
Marc D. Angel.
imprint
Woodstock, VT : Jewish Lights Pub., c2009.
description
xiv, 197 p.
ISBN
1580234119 (hardcover), 9781580234115 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Woodstock, VT : Jewish Lights Pub., c2009.
isbn
1580234119 (hardcover)
9781580234115 (hardcover)
contents note
Faith in reason, reason in faith -- The nature of God, the God of nature -- Torah from heaven -- Divine providence -- The oral Torah and rabbinic tradition -- Religion and superstition -- Israel and humanity -- Conversion to Judaism -- Eternal Torah, changing times -- Faith and reason.
catalogue key
7116081
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Rabbi Marc D. Angel discusses major themes in the writings of Maimonides and Spinoza to show us how modern people can deal with religion in an intellectually honest and meaningful way. From Maimonides, we gain insight on how to harmonize traditional religious belief with the dictates of reason. From Spinoza, we gain insight into the intellectual challenges which must be met by modern believers.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
National Jewish Book Awards, USA, 2009 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2009-11-09:
Many books and articles are devoted to the biographies and ideas of the two great Jewish philosophers, Maimonides (1138-1204) and Spinoza (1632-1677). Angel comes up with the laudable notion of comparing and contrasting their views in a single volume. This is a bold venture, since he is an Orthodox rabbi and his predecessors in the Amsterdam Jewish community excommunicated Spinoza as a heretic in 1656, just two years after the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue was founded in New Amsterdam (now New York). Angel, born into Seattle's Sephardic community, became the New York synagogue's rabbi in 1969 and now serves as rabbi emeritus. Although he is respectful of many notions advocated by Spinoza, Angel makes clear his preference for the thinking of Maimonides. He explores what each of them had to say about faith, reason, God, Torah, superstition, and the relationship between Jews and non-Jews, invariably advocating the positions espoused by Maimonides. This thoughtful presentation will appeal to everyone interested in religion, Judaism, theology, and philosophy. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, November 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Moses Maimonides (1138¿1204) is Jewish history¿s greatest exponent of a rational, philosophically sound Judaism. He strove to reconcile the teachings of the Bible and rabbinic tradition with the principles of Aristotelian philosophy, arguing that religion and philosophy ultimately must arrive at the same truth. Baruch Spinoza (1632¿1677) is Jewish history¿s most illustrious ¿heretic.¿ He believed that truth could be attained through reason alone, and that philosophy and religion were separate domains that could not be reconciled. His critique of the Bible and its teachings caused an intellectual and spiritual upheaval whose effects are still felt today. In this book, Rabbi Marc D. Angel discusses major themes in the writings of Maimonides and Spinoza as a means of exploring how modern people can deal with religion in an intellectually honest and meaningful way. From Maimonides, we gain insight on how to harmonize traditional religious belief with the dictates of reason. From Spinoza, we gain insight into the intellectual challenges which must be met by modern believers.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Prefacep. XI
Faith in Reason, Reason in Faithp. 1
The Nature of God, the God of Naturep. 23
Torah from Heavenp. 41
Divine Providencep. 53
The Oral Torah and Rabbinic Traditionp. 71
Religion and Superstitionp. 95
Israel and Humanityp. 113
Conversion to Judaismp. 131
Eternal Torah, Changing Timesp. 149
Faith and Reasonp. 177
Notesp. 185
Suggestions for Further Readingp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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