Catalogue


Entangling alliances : foreign war brides and American soldiers in the twentieth century /
Susan Zeiger.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2010.
description
xi, 299 p.
ISBN
0814797172 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780814797174 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2010.
isbn
0814797172 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780814797174 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
"Cupid in the AEF" : U.S. soldiers and women abroad in World War I -- "The worst kind of women" : foreign war brides in 1920s America -- GIs and girls around the globe : the geopolitics of sex and marriage in World War II -- "Good mothers" : GI brides after World War II -- Interracialism, pluralism, and civil rights : war bride marriage in the 1940s and 1950s -- The demise of the war bride : Korea, Vietnam, and beyond.
catalogue key
7111771
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-01-01:
In his farewell address as the first US president, George Washington's proscriptive advice for the young republic was to avoid entangling alliances. As Zeiger demonstrates, by the 20th century, it was no longer possible for the US to remain detached from world affairs. The metaphor of this new reality was the American GI. Zeiger traces changing attitudes concerning overseas US soldiers stationed in foreign countries who have sexual and romantic liaisons that often lead to marriage. US military interventions of the 20th century provide the backdrop for the changing narrative concerning soldiers and their war brides. While progressive reformers sought to protect the virtue of doughboys in France, the postwar image of intercultural/interracial marriages of US soldiers and their German and Japanese wives was viewed as a triumphal conclusion to the war against fascism and the ongoing struggles with communism. WW II marked the high point of war brides making their way to the US. The status of war brides eroded rapidly during the Cold War, when stalemate and withdrawal replaced triumphal victory as the logical conclusion of US military engagements. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. B. Miller University of Cincinnati
Reviews
Review Quotes
( "When American military forces have fought abroad, intercultural romances have been 'a minefield of political, racial and moral sensitivities," as Susan Zeiger shows in her excellent study of the foreign wartime brides of American soldiers in the twentieth century . . . She anchors her work in the study of gender, specifically the ways that women and women's sexuality have been mobilized in the context of war and the postwar period." )-(Barbara G. Friedman),( The Journal of American History )
"Zeiger has crafted a detailed study of the experiences of U.S. soldiers who married women they met overseas throughout the twentieth century.is highly recommended for those interested in the intersection of military policy with cultural and gender studies, as well as those interested in the interplay of racial and sexual politics in the military."
"Zeiger has crafted a detailed study of the experiences of U.S. soldiers who married women they met overseas throughout the twentieth century.is highly recommended for those interested in the intersection of military policy with cultural and gender studies, as well as those interested in the interplay of racial and sexual politics in the military."-On Point:The Journal of Army History,
("Zeiger has crafted a detailed study of the experiences of U.S. soldiers who married women they met overseas throughout the twentieth century.is highly recommended for those interested in the intersection of military policy with cultural and gender studies, as well as those interested in the interplay of racial and sexual politics in the military.")-(On Point:The Journal of Army History),()
"Fascinating and far-reaching, exhaustively researched and grippingly readable, Zeiger's account of American 'war brides' shrewdly links geopolitical affairs to intimate ones, and in so doing provides a novel and revealing angle on American nationalism, racism, and expanding sense of world mission during the twentieth century." - Nancy F. Cott, author ofPublic Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation
"In broad strokes, Bush takes readers from the early challenges to the accommodationism of Booker T. Washington through the tumultuous years of the 1960s." - Choice
"This story of Black social movements in the U.S., as seen from the inside by a theoretically sophisticated and committed analyst, is mandatory reading." - Immanuel Wallerstein
"When American military forces have fought abroad, intercultural romances have been 'a minefield of political, racial and moral sensitivities," as Susan Zeiger shows in her excellent study of the foreign wartime brides of American soldiers in the twentieth century . . . She anchors her work in the study of gender, specifically the ways that women and women's sexuality have been mobilized in the context of war and the postwar period."
"Fascinating and far-reaching, exhaustively researched and grippingly readable, Zeiger's account of American 'war brides' shrewdly links geopolitical affairs to intimate ones, and in so doing provides a novel and revealing angle on American nationalism, racism, and expanding sense of world mission during the twentieth century." - Nancy F. Cott, author of Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation
"Fascinating and far-reaching, exhaustively researched and grippingly readable, Zeiger's account of American 'war brides' shrewdly links geopolitical affairs to intimate ones, and in so doing provides a novel and revealing angle on American nationalism, racism, and expanding sense of world mission during the twentieth century."
"Fascinating and far-reaching, exhaustively researched and grippingly readable, Zeiger's account of American 'war brides' shrewdly links geopolitical affairs to intimate ones, and in so doing provides a novel and revealing angle on American nationalism, racism, and expanding sense of world mission during the20th century." Nancy F. Cott, author ofPublic Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation
"A wonderful study of twentieth-century war brides and their changing meanings in American society. Zeiger shows how useful it can be to study the United States and the world through the lens of gender." - Beth Bailey, author ofAmerica's Army: Making the All-Volunteer Force
"A wonderful study of twentieth-century war brides and their changing meanings in American society. Zeiger shows how useful it can be to study the United States and the world through the lens of gender." - Beth Bailey, author of America's Army: Making the All-Volunteer Force
"A wonderful study of twentieth-century war brides and their changing meanings in American society. Zeiger shows how useful it can be to study the United States and the world through the lens of gender."
"Americans' ambivalence about their (our) place in the world becomes so crystal clear when, guided here by Zeiger, we take seriously the experiences of women who have married U.S. soldiers.Entangling Alliancesreveals the perpetual anxieties of both civilians and officials about the innocence of 'our boys,' seduction, romance, and 'their women.' I learned so much from every page of this important book." - Cynthia Enloe, author ofThe Curious Feminist
"Americans' ambivalence about their (our) place in the world becomes so crystal clear when, guided here by Zeiger, we take seriously the experiences of women who have married U.S. soldiers. Entangling Alliances reveals the perpetual anxieties of both civilians and officials about the innocence of 'our boys,' seduction, romance, and 'their women.' I learned so much from every page of this important book." - Cynthia Enloe, author of The Curious Feminist
"A crucially important and incisive work on the Black Power movement, its aftermath and its antecedents. By not treating race and class an an 'either/or' proposition, Rod Bush offers a new perspective on the class basis of antiracist and Black nationalist movements. Bush has given us one of the most comprehensive analyses of the current crisis of Black leadership that I've read in a very long time." - Robin D. G. Kelley
"Americans' ambivalence about their (our) place in the world becomes so crystal clear when, guided here by Zeiger, we take seriously the experiences of women who have married U.S. soldiers. Entangling Alliances reveals the perpetual anxieties of both civilians and officials about the innocence of 'our boys,' seduction, romance, and 'their women.' I learned so much from every page of this important book."
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Throughout the twentieth century, American male soldiers returned home from wars with foreign-born wives in tow, often from allied but at times from enemy nations, resulting in a new, official category of immigrant: the "allied" war bride. These brides began to appear en masse after World War I, peaked after World War II, and persisted through the Korean and Vietnam Wars. GIs also met and married former "enemy" women under conditions of postwar occupation, although at times the US government banned such unions.In this comprehensive, complex history of war brides in 20th-century American history, Susan Zeiger uses relationships between American male soldiers and foreign women as a lens to view larger issues of sexuality, race, and gender in United States foreign relations.Entangling Alliancesdraws on a rich array of sources to trace how war and postwar anxieties about power and national identity have long been projected onto war brides, and how these anxieties translate into public policies, particularly immigration.
Main Description
Throughout the twentieth century, American male soldiers returned home from wars with foreign-born wives in tow, often from allied but at times from enemy nations, resulting in a new, official category of immigrant: the "allied" war bride. These brides began to appear en masse after World War I, peaked after World War II, and persisted through the Korean and Vietnam Wars. GIs also met and married former "enemy" women under conditions of postwar occupation, although at times the US government banned such unions. In this comprehensive, complex history of war brides in 20th-century American history, Susan Zeiger uses relationships between American male soldiers and foreign women as a lens to view larger issues of sexuality, race, and gender in United States foreign relations. Entangling Alliances draws on a rich array of sources to trace how war and postwar anxieties about power and national identity have long been projected onto war brides, and how these anxieties translate into public policies, particularly immigration.
Main Description
An "Indispensable" Book of The Black World Today website Much has been written about the Black Power movement in the United States. Most of this work, however, tends to focus on the personalities of the movement. In We Are Not What We Seem , Roderick D. Bush takes a fresh look at Black Power and other African American social movements with a specific emphasis on the role of the urban poor in the struggle for Black rights. Bush traces the trajectory of African American social movements from the time Booker T. Washington to the present, providing an integrated discussion of class. He addresses questions crucial to any understanding of Black politics: Is the Black Power movement simply another version of the traditional American ethnic politics, or does it have wider social import? What role has the federal government played in implicitly grooming social conservatives like Louis Farrakhan to assume leadership positions as opposed to leftist, grassroots, class-oriented leaders? Bush avoids the traditional liberal and social democratic approaches in favor of a more universalistic perspective that offers new insights into the history of Black movements in the U.S.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work draws on a rich array of sources to trace how war and post-war anxieties about power and national identity have long been projected onto war brides, and how these anxieties translate into public policies, particularly immigration.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
"Cupid in the AEF"p. 11
U.S. Soldiers and Women abroad in World War I
"The Worst Kind of Women"p. 39
Foreign War Brides in 1920s America
GIs and Girls around the Globep. 71
The Geopolitics of Sex and Marriage in World War II
"Good Mothers"p. 127
GI Brides after World War II
Interracialism, Pluralism, and Civil Rightsp. 163
War Bride Marriage in the 1940s and 1950s
The Demise of the War Bridep. 203
Korea, Vietnam, and Beyond
Notesp. 237
Indexp. 283
About the Authorp. 299
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem